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Inflation Figures Out Today ?

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An "inline with expectation" 5% RPI..

5.5 % RPI or if the real figure we are all suffering was to be calculated by honest people with no VI around 8%

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Looking at the RPI table I think the annual % change in RPI may well come down a bit this month.... although it doesn't feel like it. There was a small ride in the index between July and August last year that will fall out of the figures and the index has been broadly flat for the last 3 months.

My wild guess, RPI down 0.2% to 4.8%, CPI down 0.1% to 4.3%

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They will be whatever Merv needs them to be and it is temporary anyway as the target is 2% and that target will be achieved soon ....

so 0.1 down from what they were last time.

they're out

CPI 4.5% (up 0.1%) RPI 5.2% (up 0.2%)

so slightly up

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they're out

CPI 4.5% (up 0.1%) RPI 5.2% (up 0.2%)

so slightly up

September RPI/CPI (often capped at 5%) is used for a lot of pension increases - 5% is not a bad rise for pensioners!

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September RPI/CPI (often capped at 5%) is used for a lot of pension increases - 5% is not a bad rise for pensioners!

Except of course that this is the August RPI. Oops! :rolleyes:

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Next April`s pension change will be based on the inflation figures announced in September 2011. Sorry.

Any bets on a highly convenient drop next month?

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September RPI/CPI (often capped at 5%) is used for a lot of pension increases - 5% is not a bad rise for pensioners!

Cue the BBC showing hard up pensioners being most effected by this inflation when they are the only f**kers being sheltered from it.

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In months gone by, the £ would spike on the release of higher inflation, as an IR hike seemed more likely. No such response today - says a lot really.

because as the BOE has consistently highlighted inflation is not the fundamental economic force at work, the fundamental economic force remains deflation despite what the hyperwyperinflationashionistas say

the only time interest rates looked like they ould rise was earlier this year because there was a perception of a locked in recovery, without economic recovery there wont be a rise unless there is a currency run and i imagine that wouldnt happen until it fell below dollar parity

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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Sweet as a nut for Merv. Debts being inflated away for the feckless and reckless whilst the prudent enjoy a dry shafting. Is it time to redefine prudent?

Funnily enough as I lay awake worrying how to pay my escalating bills I heard a fascinating 'baleout story' on the BBC World Service.

Many Hungarians obtained swiss franc mortgages some time ago to benefit from low swiss interest rates. They thought they had lost their gamble when the swiss franc appreciated alarmingly against the forint. The Hungarian government will now facilitate redemption of the swiss franc mortgages at an artificial forint/CHF rate so that they can remortgage in their own currency. This must be a very expensive process for the Hungarian government. I hope we are sending some aid to assist with this baleout.

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Sweet as a nut for Merv. Debts being inflated away for the feckless and reckless whilst the prudent enjoy a dry shafting. Is it time to redefine prudent?

Funnily enough as I lay awake worrying how to pay my escalating bills I heard a fascinating 'baleout story' on the BBC World Service.

Many Hungarians obtained swiss franc mortgages some time ago to benefit from low swiss interest rates. They thought they had lost their gamble when the swiss franc appreciated alarmingly against the forint. The Hungarian government will now facilitate redemption of the swiss franc mortgages at an artificial forint/CHF rate so that they can remortgage in their own currency. This must be a very expensive process for the Hungarian government. I hope we are sending some aid to assist with this baleout.

it certainly needs redefining on here, id say its pretty feckless to give money to a bank to run with 99 times leverage but i suppose it didnt matter whilst the savers had the govt to backstop their recklessness and were receiving a good return in interest and debts clearly arent being inflated away, inflation has the same effect as real interest rates without income increasing similarly. Thats the harsh reality, everyone guilty as charged for accepting the koolaid savers and borrowers alike, theyve had over 30 years to think about the inevitable result of financing ever expanding govt and its debt by ever expanding mortgage debt at the expense of ever decreasing interest rates

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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Cue the BBC showing hard up pensioners being most effected by this inflation when they are the only f**kers being sheltered from it.

That depends on the type of pension!

When I reach state pension age I think it may cover the monthly food bills..... perhaps. In the meantime I live off my savings interest and a modest, non index linked, private pension, so not exactly sheltered.

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it certainly needs redefining on here, id say its pretty feckless to give money to a bank to run with 99 times leverage but i suppose it didnt matter whilst the savers had the govt to backstop their recklessness and were receiving a good return in interest and debts clearly arent being inflated away, inflation has the same effect as real interest rates without income increasing similarly. Thats the harsh reality, everyone guilty as charged for accepting the koolaid savers and borrowers alike, theyve had over 30 years to think about the inevitable result of financing ever expanding govt and its debt by ever expanding mortgage debt at the expense of ever decreasing interest rates

Don't waste your breath. The number of people on here who don't seem to understand that there is no such thing as saving, that you either a borrower or lender be, is pretty staggering. It is amazing that we have people on here for years, thousands of posts and they appear to believe it is all Gordon Brown's fault for fiddling the RPI figures or whatever. Large numbers on here think they are some sort of economic guru because they managed to spot houses are a tad overpriced. Sadly their insights don't seem to have progressed much from there.

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Don't waste your breath. The number of people on here who don't seem to understand that there is no such thing as saving, that you either a borrower or lender be, is pretty staggering. It is amazing that we have people on here for years, thousands of posts and they appear to believe it is all Gordon Brown's fault for fiddling the RPI figures or whatever. Large numbers on here think they are some sort of economic guru because they managed to spot houses are a tad overpriced. Sadly their insights don't seem to have progressed much from there.

Many people also don't seem to realise that 99% of work in the UK requires you to be paid into an acknoweldged bank account.

Hence - anyone who is working is - by defintion - a saver - whether they like it or not. ;)

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In months gone by, the £ would spike on the release of higher inflation, as an IR hike seemed more likely. No such response today - says a lot really.

Yes I noticed that, if anything its fallen. Says everything, you're quite right.

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Many people also don't seem to realise that 99% of work in the UK requires you to be paid into an acknoweldged bank account.

Hence - anyone who is working is - by defintion - a saver - whether they like it or not. ;)

there used to be like proper building societys, working like credit unions, people were too busy claiming their free shares to give a sht about what it meant and successive govts have been voted in to allow this with not a peep out of savers because they were too busy taking stellar leveraged stock market returns for 20 years, stellar property returns and possibly excessive salaries from the leveraged economy and thats not just the ones at the top i bet 50% of the posters on here work for highly leveraged companies through expansion right up to the ftse 100 who would be just as up the swanny as mortgagees if interest rates rose to the level wanted on here, how much debt is your company servicing?, as well as govt employees, whilst moaning about it.

I understand the tunnel vision but its the whole economy that has participated in this debt expansion from govt to mortgagee to company, theres no escape unless you live off the land under a rock

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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there used to be like proper building societys, working like credit unions, people were too busy claiming their free shares to give a sht about what it meant and successive govts have been voted in to allow this with not a peep out of savers because they were too busy taking stellar leveraged stock market returns for 20 years, stellar property returns and possibly excessive salaries from the leveraged economy and thats not just the ones at the top i bet 50% of the posters on here work for highly leveraged companies through expansion right up to the ftse 100 who would be just as up the swanny as mortgagees if interest rates rose to the level wanted on here, how much debt is your company servicing?, as well as govt employees, whilst moaning about it

All true, but the physical and human capital already in place today would not disappear overnight if people with huge mortgages, highly leveraged businesses, and even governments started to default on their debts. There would probably be significant turbulence while the capital was moving from weak (highly indebted) hands to stronger ones, but those jobs need not disappear and real economic output need not drop too far for too long. It would just be distributed differently.

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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