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TheCountOfNowhere

They Wont 'aggle

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Just had a thought about the governments inflation report every month.

The government's people that compile the report each month must go round shops looking at the standard price of everything.

Much like the idiotic house buyer they are more than happy to accept the ticket price of goods.

This is a British trait I think, we just wont 'aggle.

Maybe we need to get the UK people to 'aggle and a good starting point would be for the government inflation price tag report and the government inflation 'aggle price report.

That might get inflation down.

:rolleyes:

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Just had a thought about the governments inflation report every month.

The government's people that compile the report each month must go round shops looking at the standard price of everything.

Much like the idiotic house buyer they are more than happy to accept the ticket price of goods.

This is a British trait I think, we just wont 'aggle.

Maybe we need to get the UK people to 'aggle and a good starting point would be for the government inflation price tag report and the government inflation 'aggle price report.

That might get inflation down.

:rolleyes:

No im CRAP at it total CRAP .

Have dealt selling to other people who will do it the Asians are great at it , but the British no it is just not in our nature.

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Just nearly got overcarged, again - only a single item purchase. I don't think even the stores can keep up with their own computerised stock control / pricing systems. Even beore haggling best check those receipts!

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I think there is two types of haggling.

The first whereby a trader is selling a product for, let's say, £500 but you only have £480 in your pocket. You offer it and they have to think for a while to make a decision as they're already working on a pretty tight margin as it is.

The second, which tends to be rife in the antiques trade and house sales, is whereby you disregard logic, previous sold price, cost of sales, market competition, etc. and just pluck a hugely inflated figure from thin air, add a little, then double it and use it as 'a starting point'! You might as well just price all of your items for sale at one squazillion dollars and start from there.

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good point, recently ordered a £2k computer and got £400 off the asking price just by phoning them up and having a little chat... Normally I pay whatever the price says, but I think I will continue haggling for big purchases in future!

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The British don't really haggle and rather just pay the sticker price to avoid embarrassment, a good reason why house prices are where they are. So no point adjusting the inflation figures for haggling since hardly anybody does it. I find you can haggle in most shops except supermarkets. I now have an ongoing game with my local kwik-e-mart to haggle on wine every week or two - can get a decent deal (better than at local Tescos) even on only two bottles with snacks thrown in. Certain cultures enjoy the haggle so haggling with Indians for example usually actually gains you respect. Anyway, must post this of course:

Edited by mikthe20

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good point, recently ordered a £2k computer and got £400 off the asking price just by phoning them up and having a little chat... Normally I pay whatever the price says, but I think I will continue haggling for big purchases in future!

£2k. Was it NASAs?

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I often haggle, it's hard in the supermarkets, so I just scout them for bargains, but in most other shops, your best off showing interest, waving the cash (a short amount of cash - 10%-20% lower than the asking price), then enquire if they will do it for cheaper, if they can make a profit, they'll nearly take your hand off and give it you for the cheaper price.

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good point, recently ordered a £2k computer and got £400 off the asking price just by phoning them up and having a little chat... Normally I pay whatever the price says, but I think I will continue haggling for big purchases in future!

What is it, a Cray? :lol:

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is 2k a lot then? my associate just purchased one for over £5k..

You seem to have a lot of money to waste... I bet 50% of that price tag is pure profit for the seller.

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depends on what you need your computer for, doesn't it? You could easily spend 2k on a high end PC, which would perform a lot better at certain applications than a standard 250 quid PC.

Fast graphics cards and storage systems are expensive, but if you need high end power it might be cheaper to pay the ticket price rather than wait around 4-5 times as long for the cheaper option to finish calculating (if it could even do it in the first place). I used to work for a company that paid 7.5k + VAT for their high-end PCs, and they used to consider it a great investment with regards to what they could earn from the work it made possible.

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depends on what you need your computer for, doesn't it? You could easily spend 2k on a high end PC, which would perform a lot better at certain applications than a standard 250 quid PC.

Fast graphics cards and storage systems are expensive, but if you need high end power it might be cheaper to pay the ticket price rather than wait around 4-5 times as long for the cheaper option to finish calculating (if it could even do it in the first place). I used to work for a company that paid 7.5k + VAT for their high-end PCs, and they used to consider it a great investment with regards to what they could earn from the work it made possible.

Spot on - but a lot of the posters here are only interested in who can live off a pot of beans per day, and predicting the end of the world (unfortunately)

The one I am sat in front of right now would have cost around £10k a couple years back from Dell, but I built this to my spec anyway as Dell couldnt deliver everything I wanted.

The one i ordered was actually from dell - after "haggling", ordering from them was approx £200 more expensive than building it myself, so i went with them as i wanted the warranty, and everything prebuilt to save my time. Which is back to the original point of the thread - simply by speaking to someone and doing some basic haggling, it is possible to get big companies to discount their prices.... Certainly opened my eyes and i will be following a similar strategy in future

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If there's something soon to go out of date at a supermarket, I take it to the till and haggle. Works well if there is more than one of the items and you can get a bulk discount. Forget finding a store assistant - they'll just shrug their shoulders and say "dunno". Get to the cash desk, where there are people in line behind you, and the person at the checkout will quickly buzz for a supervisor and nine times out of ten I get the discount I suggest.

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I think there is two types of haggling.

The first whereby a trader is selling a product for, let's say, £500 but you only have £480 in your pocket. You offer it and they have to think for a while to make a decision as they're already working on a pretty tight margin as it is.

The second, which tends to be rife in the antiques trade and house sales, is whereby you disregard logic, previous sold price, cost of sales, market competition, etc. and just pluck a hugely inflated figure from thin air, add a little, then double it and use it as 'a starting point'! You might as well just price all of your items for sale at one squazillion dollars and start from there.

Yes, the first type you eventually consume, break, get tired of, goes out of fashion, throw away so ceases to exist....the second is a gamble as to whether it will increase in value after it is sold...a heavier penalty to pay, unless the proceeds from the sale and what is bought with it be it education/training, business, alternative investment grow faster, increase in value greater than the growing loss left behind. ;)

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  • 335 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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