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One In Three Uk Households 'never Worked' In Liverpool

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/8749282/One-in-three-UK-households-never-worked-in-Liverpool.html

In Liverpool, 31.9pc of houses last year were without anyone who has ever had a paid job. The figure fell from 32.1pc the previous year, but it is still the worst in the country. Glasgow had 31.1pc of workless households, down form 30.7pc the year before. But Nottingham’s “never-worked” rate increased slightly to 31.6pc.

It is the second year in a row the three cities had the worst concentration of workless households, with Liverpool having had the highest number in five of the past seven years, the Office for National Statistics revealed.

Being sick or disabled was the main reason people could not get a job in Liverpool or Glasgow, with around a third of those not working saying this was holding them back – the same as the national figure.

However, in Nottingham, 43pc of workless households gave study as their main reason, compared with 12pc nationally.

The areas with the lowest number of workless households were Oxfordshire, Surrey, Aberdeen, and North East Moray, all around 11pc.

An incredible figure for so many cities.

The structural unemployed has never been tackled, although I would like to see historical perspective on this figure.

I wonder how many people local govt and central govt employ in these areas, I'm betting there is total state dependency in these regions.

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To give some perspective, I believe the total number of households in the N.West where no-one currently has a job is around 21%, presumably this includes elderly households.

The figures the OP quoted are for 'Have never had a job' ... not merely 'don't currently have a job'.

It's absolutely shocking to see how many are utterly dependent on a welfare state at a time when the country is sinking deeper and deeper into debt. Many of these people are likely to be essentially unemployable, hence will never be productive to the economy, only ever a drain.

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The figures the OP quoted are for 'Have never had a job' ... not merely 'don't currently have a job'.

It's absolutely shocking to see how many are utterly dependent on a welfare state at a time when the country is sinking deeper and deeper into debt. Many of these people are likely to be essentially unemployable, hence will never be productive to the economy, only ever a drain.

So what is the answer how do we as a nation sort this out ?

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From The Bangles - Going Down To Liverpool (and do nothing) 1985:

Hey now

Where you going with that load of nothing in your hand

I said, hey now

All through this green and pleasant land.

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

All the days of my life

All the days of my life

Hey there

Where you going with that UB40 in your hand

I said, hey there.

All through this green and pleasant land

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

All the days of my life

All the days of my life.

Hey now

Where you going with that UB40 in your hand

I said hey now

All through this green and pleasant land

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

I'm going down to Liverpool to do nothing

All the days of my life

All the days of my life

...almost seems prophetic 25 years on.

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I have never worked in Liverpool although I used to in nearby Chester. A quick straw poll of my office colleagues reveals that none of them have worked in Liverpool. Impressive that 2/3 of UK population apparently have though...

On the article itself. I wonder what an updating of Boys from the Black stuff would look like.

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/8749282/One-in-three-UK-households-never-worked-in-Liverpool.html

An incredible figure for so many cities.

The structural unemployed has never been tackled, although I would like to see historical perspective on this figure.

I wonder how many people local govt and central govt employ in these areas, I'm betting there is total state dependency in these regions.

Beware definitions. May be less incredible than you think.

Bear in mind that, unless living with parents, most single students are a "household" and have never worked. big cities tend to have more students, thats where the universities are.

Bear in mind that an elderly widow is a household and may well never have worked. Women live longer than men so amongst the elderly there is a weighting towards the widow.

(My mother- in law is an example. Owns her home outright, adequate pension based on deceased father-in-law's pension from his life-time employment. Never worked - in those days the man earned the woman stayed at home looking after the kids, cleaning the house and making sure there was a meal on the table the instant man walks through the door. She's presumably not an instance of the state dependancy you're talking about?)

Its easy to jump on a politically correct bandwaggon with exagerated figures. Of course these places are highly likely to have the highest proportions of households containing people of working age, not in education, who have never had a job, and who are in receipt of benefits. But better to calculate the true number that relates to the point being made.

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Beware definitions. May be less incredible than you think.

Bear in mind that, unless living with parents, most single students are a "household" and have never worked. big cities tend to have more students, thats where the universities are.

Bear in mind that an elderly widow is a household and may well never have worked. Women live longer than men so amongst the elderly there is a weighting towards the widow.

(My mother- in law is an example. Owns her home outright, adequate pension based on deceased father-in-law's pension from his life-time employment. Never worked - in those days the man earned the woman stayed at home looking after the kids, cleaning the house and making sure there was a meal on the table the instant man walks through the door. She's presumably not an instance of the state dependancy you're talking about?)

Its easy to jump on a politically correct bandwaggon with exagerated figures. Of course these places are highly likely to have the highest proportions of households containing people of working age, not in education, who have never had a job, and who are in receipt of benefits. But better to calculate the true number that relates to the point being made.

You really don't know any Scousers do you?

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You really don't know any Scousers do you?

:) If you say so. Odds are I'm wrong, probably irrelevant that for decades private sector companies have paid me to know the definitions and analyse this sort of data.

Simply leading the horse to water for my own amusement. It goes like this....

People say - we'd never have expected this number could possibly be so high.

Somebody says - there's a good reason, the reported number is not quite what it seems, the true figure for your calculation is not quite so high.

People say - no, no, we couldn't believe it then - but now we've said the number ourselves and found it convenient it must be correct after all.

Dehydrated corpse of horse is found beside pool of water.

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...thought this was being trimmed country wide...?.... :unsure:

Being sick or disabled was the main reason people could not get a job in Liverpool or Glasgow, with around a third of those not working saying this was holding them back – the same as the national figure.

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I have never worked in Liverpool although I used to in nearby Chester. A quick straw poll of my office colleagues reveals that none of them have worked in Liverpool. Impressive that 2/3 of UK population apparently have though...

On the article itself. I wonder what an updating of Boys from the Black stuff would look like.

The Eu and Gov with be throwing £1000's at innovative new training schemes to get immigrants in Liverpool back to work.

Such as the scheme to teach Thai minority groups 'hidden' taxidermy techniques. This is to carry on the ancient art of embalming dead male relatives.

Locals are calling it 'Lady boys from the back stuffed'

:P:unsure:

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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The figures the OP quoted are for 'Have never had a job' ... not merely 'don't currently have a job'.

It's absolutely shocking to see how many are utterly dependent on a welfare state at a time when the country is sinking deeper and deeper into debt. Many of these people are likely to be essentially unemployable, hence will never be productive to the economy, only ever a drain.

Not good, but has it ever been good? there will always be unemployed the percentage differs depending on what figures you use....long term several generations that have never worked is a national disgrace being we live in one of the richest countries in the world...very little has been done to break the habit, governments have paid the benefits to keep the peace, the easy life...the benefits are after all invested back into the economy indirectly....

...investment in industry and apprenticeship training to go with it could help, at least the school leavers would then get half a chance to do something worthwhile in their lives...but first of all they need to sort the schooling out, give the kids an achievable vision and purpose to learn. ;)

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I find it interesting that the most horrific unemployment figures tend to be in cities that once supported hundreds of thousands of jobs in heavy industries which have since declined, and would speculate that a big part of the problem is the unwillingness of people to move to find work, and of government to realise that cities and regions go through peaks and troughs of economic activity.

In Detroit, for example, they've realised that the city contracting, because the industry that supported it at the peak of its size is also contracting. Many of the people who live there have left to find work elsewhere, and the suburbs they've left are being pulled down and turned back into countryside. Whereas here, people tend to resist that. Middlesbrough was built on iron ore extraction and steelmaking. The iron ore was mined out by the 1970s, the steelworks shut and the jobs were gone. But rather than a big part of the population moving on to wherever jobs were being created, they stayed there on benefits in decaying inner-city estates, while politicians tried desparately to conjure up new sources of employment with taxpayers' money. They couldn't, because we'd moved on to being a service sector economy (essentially), and the local workforce didn't have the skills that were needed and the companies that were creating jobs didn't want to set up shop there. But any suggestion that someone looking for work should be prepared to relocate to find is howled down as being evil, Norman Tebbit, Tory callousness, with the Guardian-reading tendency holding dear the belief that we should be entitled to spend our entire lives in the town we grew up in, with the taxpayer paying our way if we can't find a job. Frankly we shouldn't put up with this. Apart from a few exceptions where long-distance relocation would cause more economic problems than it solved (e.g. the spouse of an unemployed person would have to give up a well-paid job to relocate with the family), we should not be paying benefits to anyone for whom a job is available elsewhere in the UK and they refuse to take it.

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Nottingham is the only place ive ever lived where the shopping malls are busier during the week than at weekends, and its not just the students...

Ive some scouse family too, well, i say scouse, the first thing they did was leave the place once their education was over. Such a miserable, entitled, cant do outlook on life was their general feeling about their townsfolk.

Pretty much what Boris said and was forced to apologise for, i guess.

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In Detroit, for example, they've realised that the city contracting, because the industry that supported it at the peak of its size is also contracting. Many of the people who live there have left to find work elsewhere, and the suburbs they've left are being pulled down and turned back into countryside. Whereas here, people tend to resist that. Middlesbrough was built on iron ore extraction and steelmaking. The iron ore was mined out by the 1970s, the steelworks shut and the jobs were gone. But rather than a big part of the population moving on to wherever jobs were being created, they stayed there on benefits in decaying inner-city estates, while politicians tried desparately to conjure up new sources of employment with taxpayers' money. They couldn't, because we'd moved on to being a service sector economy (essentially), and the local workforce didn't have the skills that were needed and the companies that were creating jobs didn't want to set up shop there. But any suggestion that someone looking for work should be prepared to relocate to find is howled down as being evil, Norman Tebbit, Tory callousness, with the Guardian-reading tendency holding dear the belief that we should be entitled to spend our entire lives in the town we grew up in, with the taxpayer paying our way if we can't find a job. Frankly we shouldn't put up with this. Apart from a few exceptions where long-distance relocation would cause more economic problems than it solved (e.g. the spouse of an unemployed person would have to give up a well-paid job to relocate with the family), we should not be paying benefits to anyone for whom a job is available elsewhere in the UK and they refuse to take it.

I think you will find in many cases moving to find work is alot easier said than done. Sounds simple follow the jobs but lets look at it in a bit more detail.

You state in your post that industries such as steel works were closed and the jobs gone . You then go on to say the people in those places did not have the skills for the new service sector jobs so companies did not want to set up in those places. Well the people cannot move on to do jobs they once did eslewhere as those types of jobs have gone accross the country not just in places like Liverpool or Middlesbrough . If they have not got the skills for the service sector economy then moving to where the services sector has created jobs they will find that they will not be employed there either.

Beleive me I have been there I came out of the Chemical insustry as much of that moved abroad, I retrained at my own expense and in my own time but being 43 years old I was looked at as if I had two heads when I tried to find employment in the service sector economy. It has taken a long time to shake the YOUR IN THE WRONG HOLE metality of those In H.R. . Today I work via an agency and temp , I meet full time permenante staff , without blowing my own trupmet i can run rings around them I feel much more able to do the roles however when it comes to the agency putting my C.V. forward for permenante work it is often rejected and interviews are few and far between.

Then there are the logistics of moving . If you own a house in an area that is declining and want to sell it and buy one in an area with jobs there will be 1. A price differential and 2. It will be hard to find a buyer, even if you do there will be many costs invloved. If you are a council tennent you will have to find someone to swop with . Who is going to swop with you as you are offering a home in a deprived area which is on a downward slope ?

To give up a council tenancy and move somewhere else and rent privatley is also more expensive and gives little security. If you have children there will be the need to uproot them during their schooling. This is all on top of having to move away from family and friends to a new area when their support in a very stressful time will be needed more than ever.

There are many people who do move for work and living in London and the south east all my life I have seen many people from all the cities in this country who work away from home and live in B&B's or sleep in trucks and caravans during the week returing home at the weekends . This shows they are willing but also shows that the towns and citys they come form are not able to support them in work and stay depressed.

You give the example of Detroit and how people moved out . Yes they did but they did not do it over night , and I think you will also find that renting property in the states when moving form one city to the next is far easier and cheaper than it is over here.

Liverpool has been given as an example of how few people work in that city , but at present there is also high unemployment in all areas of the U.K. there is not any place in this country where the jobs are plentifull ,only tonight on the BBC London news they stated that 25 people were fighting for each and every vacancie.

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Beware definitions. May be less incredible than you think.

Bear in mind that, unless living with parents, most single students are a "household" and have never worked. big cities tend to have more students, thats where the universities are.

Bear in mind that an elderly widow is a household and may well never have worked. Women live longer than men so amongst the elderly there is a weighting towards the widow.

(My mother- in law is an example. Owns her home outright, adequate pension based on deceased father-in-law's pension from his life-time employment. Never worked - in those days the man earned the woman stayed at home looking after the kids, cleaning the house and making sure there was a meal on the table the instant man walks through the door. She's presumably not an instance of the state dependancy you're talking about?)

Its easy to jump on a politically correct bandwaggon with exagerated figures. Of course these places are highly likely to have the highest proportions of households containing people of working age, not in education, who have never had a job, and who are in receipt of benefits. But better to calculate the true number that relates to the point being made.

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Beware definitions. May be less incredible than you think.

Bear in mind that, unless living with parents, most single students are a "household" and have never worked. big cities tend to have more students, thats where the universities are.

Bear in mind that an elderly widow is a household and may well never have worked. Women live longer than men so amongst the elderly there is a weighting towards the widow.

(My mother- in law is an example. Owns her home outright, adequate pension based on deceased father-in-law's pension from his life-time employment. Never worked - in those days the man earned the woman stayed at home looking after the kids, cleaning the house and making sure there was a meal on the table the instant man walks through the door. She's presumably not an instance of the state dependancy you're talking about?)

Its easy to jump on a politically correct bandwaggon with exagerated figures. Of course these places are highly likely to have the highest proportions of households containing people of working age, not in education, who have never had a job, and who are in receipt of benefits. But better to calculate the true number that relates to the point being made.

How does this tally with being sick or disabled being the main reason Liverpudlians can't work?

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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