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Tourist Complains About Sight Of Fish In Harbour

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http://www.telegraph...in-harbour.html

Most holiday makers taking a stroll around a working harbour might expect to see the odd fish.

But when David Copp came across a fishing trawler moored in Ilfracombe Harbour he took great offence and complained about the "disgusting" smell.

The 46-year-old was outraged that his children, aged seven and nine, had been forced to endure the sight of 12 crates of dead fish and crabs, piled up on the quayside.

He said the ordeal had left them "quite distressed" and demanded to know why the harbourmaster was not more considerate to tourists.

"There were flies flying around and the smell was awful," he said. "The ship was just sat there not doing anything, and there were 12 crates of dead crabs and fish just lying there covered in flies.

"It's not the sort of thing you want to see on holiday, there was a real stench.

"My children were quite distressed by it. These people should be a bit more considerate to the holidaymakers."

Mr Copp called Ilfracombe harbourmaster Rob Lawson to complain about the smell that had emanated from The Lady of Lundy trawler before calling the North Devon Journal to air his woes.

Mr Lawson tried to explain that fishermen depended on the daily catch for their livelihoods and that it was a common site on a working quayside.

"He was very upset that he had come across the boxes of fish and thought it was entirely inappropriate and not a good sight or smell," he said.

"I explained the workings of the harbour and that it was a working quay and that while it was not ideal, sometimes this happened.

"But he didn't calm down, he went to the local newspaper and then when they printed his complaints, he came back to me to see what I had to say."

Mr Lawson admitted that it was quite unusual to have a working harbour with public access.

But he added: "This is generally considered an asset because visitors can get a really good feel for how the industry works, they can enjoy the whole experience.

"I told this chap that you shouldn't take your children to a harbour if that is how they react to dead fish."

Mr Copp is understood to have been on a two-week family holiday in the popular north Devon tourist resort when he lodged his complaint, which attracted disbelief from locals.

One said: "Ridiculous. Does he think all his food comes in packets? What did he expect to see at a working harbour?"

Tony Rutherford, the managing director of Bideford Fisheries said "Seeing us in action is often considered a tourist attraction in these parts."

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http://www.telegraph...in-harbour.html

Most holiday makers taking a stroll around a working harbour might expect to see the odd fish.

But when David Copp came across a fishing trawler moored in Ilfracombe Harbour he took great offence and complained about the "disgusting" smell.

The 46-year-old was outraged that his children, aged seven and nine, had been forced to endure the sight of 12 crates of dead fish and crabs, piled up on the quayside.

He said the ordeal had left them "quite distressed" and demanded to know why the harbourmaster was not more considerate to tourists.

(snip)

One said: "Ridiculous. Does he think all his food comes in packets? What did he expect to see at a working harbour?"

Tony Rutherford, the managing director of Bideford Fisheries said "Seeing us in action is often considered a tourist attraction in these parts."

What next? Day trippers complaining that the smell of cowpats put them off their picnic?

If he went to many parts of the world the beach would be spoilt by the sight of locals cr$pping on it!

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They should print a picture of this chump & his story and ensure it makes his local press. His community should see what a complete dip stick he is. That will be the best lesson his children could learn.

Plus the price of his house of course ;)

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And I always thought that places getting messed up for tourists was just what happened, when they naturally started providing facilities to accommodate them. I don't like that - it turns decent places into some sort of theme park and changes the place you go to see, which IMO isn't a good thing. It's probably unavoidable. I didn't realise that anyone actually wanted that.

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http://www.telegraph...in-harbour.html

Most holiday makers taking a stroll around a working harbour might expect to see the odd fish.

But when David Copp came across a fishing trawler moored in Ilfracombe Harbour he took great offence and complained about the "disgusting" smell.

The 46-year-old was outraged that his children, aged seven and nine, had been forced to endure the sight of 12 crates of dead fish and crabs, piled up on the quayside.

He said the ordeal had left them "quite distressed" and demanded to know why the harbourmaster was not more considerate to tourists.

"There were flies flying around and the smell was awful," he said. "The ship was just sat there not doing anything, and there were 12 crates of dead crabs and fish just lying there covered in flies.

"It's not the sort of thing you want to see on holiday, there was a real stench.

"My children were quite distressed by it. These people should be a bit more considerate to the holidaymakers."

Mr Copp called Ilfracombe harbourmaster Rob Lawson to complain about the smell that had emanated from The Lady of Lundy trawler before calling the North Devon Journal to air his woes.

Mr Lawson tried to explain that fishermen depended on the daily catch for their livelihoods and that it was a common site on a working quayside.

"He was very upset that he had come across the boxes of fish and thought it was entirely inappropriate and not a good sight or smell," he said.

"I explained the workings of the harbour and that it was a working quay and that while it was not ideal, sometimes this happened.

"But he didn't calm down, he went to the local newspaper and then when they printed his complaints, he came back to me to see what I had to say."

Mr Lawson admitted that it was quite unusual to have a working harbour with public access.

But he added: "This is generally considered an asset because visitors can get a really good feel for how the industry works, they can enjoy the whole experience.

"I told this chap that you shouldn't take your children to a harbour if that is how they react to dead fish."

Mr Copp is understood to have been on a two-week family holiday in the popular north Devon tourist resort when he lodged his complaint, which attracted disbelief from locals.

One said: "Ridiculous. Does he think all his food comes in packets? What did he expect to see at a working harbour?"

Tony Rutherford, the managing director of Bideford Fisheries said "Seeing us in action is often considered a tourist attraction in these parts."

And now his own local paper will probably pounce on it with glee - so often short of a good story - and he'll be made to look a t*t at home, too.

Reminds me of an even worse t*tness a few yrs ago - a couple who'd moved to N Devon wrote to the local paper complaining about the noise of the air-sea rescue practice flights at night.

Local reaction was so furious they were forced to sell up and leave.

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My recollection of Ilfracombe: nice place, bit of a whiff to the harbour but the chippies were worse than the working boats.

Worst maritime experience was the ferry to Lundy: hopelessly overcrowded (and that was October).

And in the best English tradition, an overpriced hotel room with serious defects: in this case a non-working shower. Grrrr ...

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Reminds me of a letter that got sent to me when I worked in Local Govt in Norfolk. It was from a recently retired to the area londoner. Their letter of complaint was about the tractors driving past their house early in the morning. But the best was this;

and if the tractors are not bad enough we have to endure being woken early in the morning by the birds

-facepalm-

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My recollection of Ilfracombe: nice place, bit of a whiff to the harbour but the chippies were worse than the working boats.

Worst maritime experience was the ferry to Lundy: hopelessly overcrowded (and that was October).

And in the best English tradition, an overpriced hotel room with serious defects: in this case a non-working shower. Grrrr ...

Look on the bright side. In view of the likely intermittant use this fault probably saved you from a dose of Legionella. <_<

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What a prize twa*

Having spent last week in Ilfracombe with the wife and little one, I can safely say the place was very clean and tidy for a working harbour and certainly compared to some British seaside resorts.

There was a crate of fish odds and ends on the quay when we where there but they were gone after a couple of hours.

The fishing 'fleet' of Our Lady trawlers were in excellent shape as were the tourist boats.

The only time they were sat there not doing anything was when the tide had gone out leaving them beached.

Spring tides last week - 10m range. Incredible to see. Our 5 year old had a whale of a time.

I can recommend it as being a friendly little place for a week of not doing too much.

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Reminds me of the time a new neighbour came to my parents village. She was paralysed by a Royal Mail workers van received a huge compensation settlement and bought the house next door. She complained about the churchbells chiming practice and in Sunday mornings.

Didn't get much better when I shot a crow flying over our garden that swiftly plummeted to earth. Her partner then piped up over the hedge, asking what I was doing... looking at my shotgun I said it was pretty bloody obvious, he then sternly told me that he was a firearms officer - told him to **** off as I wasn't doing anything wrong and that if he had any concerns about the legality of what I was doing then he should have called for a police officer who knew his job.

He stopped my father lighting bonfires in his two acres of land as well, he obliged as he couldn't be bothered with the grief.

They were townies originally.

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So can motorists. I don't shoot them.

Motorists don't blind sheep by pecking at their eyes, fairly common but goes unreported as foxes usually get to them before the farmers and decimate the evidence. Crows are extremely predatory/territorial often flying between trees over a field squawking obscenities.

Motorists don't scavenge the fields for food lowering crop yields.

Granted my reasons were less focused on the above and more on cleaning my gun, testing the firing mechanism and not wasting cartridges firing at nothing.

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Motorists don't blind sheep by pecking at their eyes, fairly common but goes unreported as foxes usually get to them before the farmers and decimate the evidence. Crows are extremely predatory/territorial often flying between trees over a field squawking obscenities.

Motorists don't scavenge the fields for food lowering crop yields.

Granted my reasons were less focused on the above and more on cleaning my gun, testing the firing mechanism and not wasting cartridges firing at nothing.

You're not supposed to shoot crows unless they're actually causing a nuisance en mass (such as eating crops). They are very intelligent birds and will soon learn to avoid areas where crows have been shot.

Taking random pot-shots at passing crows is not only illegal, but also counter-productive, since it has no deterrent effect. Actually, it's exactly the sort of thing you'd expect a townie to do. Most country folk only kill when they have good reason to do so.

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You're not supposed to shoot crows unless they're actually causing a nuisance en mass (such as eating crops). They are very intelligent birds and will soon learn to avoid areas where crows have been shot.

Taking random pot-shots at passing crows is not only illegal, but also counter-productive, since it has no deterrent effect. Actually, it's exactly the sort of thing you'd expect a townie to do. Most country folk only kill when they have good reason to do so.

It happened over 8 years ago - I know most country folk being one myself and know 'most' would not weigh up the options before shooting at one and just do it. They are intelligent, vanish at the sight of a metal tube under your arm - they ain't daft. The classification for vermin changes all the time, it was not illegal to do so then as I was more than 50 metres from a road... if the rules have changed please enlighten me although I only shoot clays very occasionally and haven't done so for quite some time.

Edit: last time I fired a shotgun was at my stag do four years ago and I dusted 49 out of 50 clays, winged 1 at an orgainsed shoot. I was hungover and taking the michael, shouting 'pull' before breaking the gun, loading and throwing the gun onto the target without thought for correct posture - the guys running the shoot were taken aback, laughed and told me i was doing it all wrong, instead concentrated on getting the 10 others through the mornings clays, next highest score was sub 30, with an average of under twenty. I don't offer second chances, again proved on live fire exercises at Lydd :D

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. Crows are extremely predatory/territorial often flying between trees over a field squawking obscenities.

This is very interesting - I have 2 questions: Precisely what obscenities does a crow squawk, and how and where did you learn to speak Crowish ?

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You're not supposed to shoot crows unless they're actually causing a nuisance en mass (such as eating crops). They are very intelligent birds and will soon learn to avoid areas where crows have been shot.

Taking random pot-shots at passing crows is not only illegal, but also counter-productive, since it has no deterrent effect. Actually, it's exactly the sort of thing you'd expect a townie to do. Most country folk only kill when they have good reason to do so.

Errrr :rolleyes:

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I'm from the countryside .... but seem to remember being the prey not the hunter. Chased by herds of cows, horses, shetland ponies, adders, and even had a kamikaze sheep leap off a cliff into my garden.

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This is very interesting - I have 2 questions: Precisely what obscenities does a crow squawk, and how and where did you learn to speak Crowish ?

It was part of my BASC proficiency course, much like when Joe Foreigner swears... you just know it's abuse.

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  • 338 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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