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Shotoflight

Mr & Mrs Average In Ni

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Cash-strapped households turn to leftovers

The number of Britons cooking with leftovers to feed their families has risen dramatically in recent months as cash-strapped shoppers try to make their household budgets stretch further.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/consumertips/household-bills/8818586/Cash-strapped-households-turn-to-leftovers.html

Going forward, four in ten shoppers say that they intend to make better use of leftovers to feed their families in the months ahead.

The austere measures come in the face of rising prices on the high street and declining disposable incomes.

The IGD’s findings come days after official figures showed that the amount that families spent on groceries, petrol and other day-to-day essentials fell to the lowest level in almost a decade over the second quarter of 2011.

80,000 can't afford to pay for care

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/insurance/8819445/80000-cant-afford-to-pay-for-care.html

How long would your money last if you needed nursing care? For 80,000 elderly people each year the answer is ''not long enough'', as their wealth is rapidly depleted, forcing them to fall back on often inferior local authority care. In many cases this will mean a forced move to a cheaper residential home, or, if care is received at home, scaling back the level of service.

Given the high cost of nursing care, it is not hard to see why so many run out of funds each year. The average care home now costs more than £30,000 a year – more than the cost of a year's education at Eton.

But, thanks to complex means tests, many people don't get any help at all towards these costs. If you have assets of more than £23,250 – and in most cases this will include the value of any property owned – you will be deemed a "self-funder", and left to arrange your own care.

Edited by Shotoflight

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What are leftovers? Not a crumb of food gets thrown out in our house (apart from food for the birds in winter) Anyone who throws out food deserves to be hard up.

I agree. I really do throw lots out but I'm trying to change.

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The 'squeezed middle' speak of falling incomes

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15253761

Sean Ryan, 48, from Manchester, says he used to consider himself part of a middle-income family.

Earning about £40,000 a year until he lost his job in corporate compliance in 2010, Mr Ryan says the change in fortunes in that time has seen his family now living below the poverty line.

His wife is a teacher, but has taken time out from work to look after their young children.

The couple have used up all their savings, and he says it is their children - aged three and five - who have taken "the biggest hit".

He says he and his wife have tried to "ring-fence" their children as much as possible, but have gone without food and are in arrears with their mortgage.

Mr Ryan says the problems they have faced are not just "middle-class worries", with the threat of repossession ever-present.

Ulrike Clarke, 54, believes the only answer for her family is to sell up and trade their life in Suffolk for her home country of Germany.

Mr Pearson's response to the reduction in income is to consider selling their home and going to live on a narrow boat.

But what might appear to be a romantic solution actually angers him:

"Income is being eroded all the time," he says.

"The system seems to be set up to charge you money.

"And the poorer you get, the more you get charged for borrowing money. It's a bit like a whirlpool - when you're caught in it, you get sucked in deeper and deeper.

"We used to be a middle income family, but we're not anymore."

Edited by Shotoflight

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Families are facing the biggest fall in income since 1970s

Warning recovery is weakest since World War I

Unemployment figures due out today expected to be worst for 17 years

Institute of Fiscal Studies forecasts 600,000 more children will be pushed into poverty by 2013, taking the total living in ‘absolute’ poverty to 3.1m

On the eve of the release of the worst unemployment figures for 17 years, the Institute for Fiscal Studies found families are about to endure their biggest income drop since the 1970s.

This means a typical couple with two children is likely to be £2,080 worse off in 2013 terms than they were last year as their real income falls from £30,056 to £27,976.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2048032/Families-facing-biggest-fall-income-1970s.html#ixzz1aZBBJqRw

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Families are facing the biggest fall in income since 1970s

Warning recovery is weakest since World War I

Unemployment figures due out today expected to be worst for 17 years

Institute of Fiscal Studies forecasts 600,000 more children will be pushed into poverty by 2013, taking the total living in ‘absolute’ poverty to 3.1m

On the eve of the release of the worst unemployment figures for 17 years, the Institute for Fiscal Studies found families are about to endure their biggest income drop since the 1970s.

This means a typical couple with two children is likely to be £2,080 worse off in 2013 terms than they were last year as their real income falls from £30,056 to £27,976.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2048032/Families-facing-biggest-fall-income-1970s.html#ixzz1aZBBJqRw

Ah the 70s. A little bit of history repeating.

Fox on the Run by the sweet. 1975. Perhaps someone can embed the youtube video.

http://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/dazedandconfused/foxontherun.htm

I don't wanna know your name

Cause you don't look the same

The way you did before

OK you think you got a pretty face

But the rest of you is out of place

You looked all right before

Fox on the run

You screamed and everybody comes a-running

Take a run and hide yourself away

Fox on the run

F-foxy, foxy on the run and hideaway

Spacehoppers for Christmas - forget about the Ipad.

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A very comprehensive report: The Northern Ireland Economy - Women on the Edge. July 2011

Seems to have slipped under the radar. (Jim Fitzpatrick, I'm talking about you on your big BBC Nolanesque pay cheque))

The few excerpts below do not do the well researched report justice. Please give it a few minutes of your time if it interests you, at the very least the housing section. Many real world examples which dig below the stats and numbers. I found it shocking. And, having hung about here for a year or two, I'm not easily shocked.

Full Report

http://wrda.net/Documents/The%20NI%20Economy%20-%20Women%20on%20the%20Edge%20Report.pdf

Executive Summary

http://www.wrda.net/Documents/The%20NI%20Economy%20-%20Women%20on%20the%20Edge%20Exec%20Summary.pdf

Significantly, 56% of CAB clients were owner occupiers, an increase on 45% in 2008-2009 but continuing the upward trend

CAB has five years of debt statistics which reveal significant trends: mortgage debt, for example,that was £475,000 in 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 is now £4.5million.

Credit card debt was the most common problem accounting for 30% of overall debt and almost 40% of the number of debts. The three largest sources of debt – credit cards, personal loans and mortgage debt – all increased over the year. The sums are considerable: almost £10m in credit card debt, £5.7m in personal loans and almost £5.5m in mortgage debt. Among other debts there is £2.4m in business debt.

This confirms Your Money Garden findings in late 2010 on women’s relationship with credit and debt. Your Money Garden found that credit and store cards were the most common form of debt among the women interviewed who reported debts ranging from several hundred to many thousands of pounds. A significant number had loans from other lenders such as banks, building societies and private loan companies. There were repayments for items bought by hire purchase and from catalogues. A large proportion had

problems with utility payments while a smaller number had rent and mortgage arrears. Half of the women reported debts in excess of £10,000, exclusive of mortgage debt.

Housing and Energy Debt - P140

The Housing Rights Service saw an increase of 300% in clients for debt advice during 2008-2009. In the first quarter of 2011 their client group increased again, by 30%. Overall in 2010-11 the Service dealt with 28,400 housing enquiries in comparison to 15,000 in 2009-10. Those coming for advice have rent arrears or mortgage debt and are struggling with paying for utility bills and household and family expenses generally. They may have already had high levels of borrowing, particularly where mortgages are concerned.

Post-conflict housing boom

Because of low house prices and the conflict, sub-prime mortgage lenders stayed out of the housing market in Northern Ireland for many years. Then, with a peace process underway and the credit boom this changed. There was an explosion in the number of mortgage products available and with high-risk loans accounting for a significant share of the market. Many people were sold these through intermediaries working in the sub prime sector.

There are myriads of issues which lead women and men into housing debt: unemployment (21% of all cases), reduced remuneration (17%), ill health (13%) and relationship breakdown (11%). Most people coming to the Housing Rights Service for advice are already in debt, but the type of client in debt and the type of circumstances have changed due to the credit boom and the recession. Before the boom, illness was a major concern for those seeking advice. After the boom, more struggling double income

families have turned to the Service because they are over-stretched. Circumstances such as having a new baby and suffering a loss of income are factors.

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The Shecession (UK article)

We are in a she-cession as women suffer most in downturn, writes Professor Harriet Bradley

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2011/10/14/we-are-in-a-she-cession-as-women-suffer-most-in-downturn-writes-professor-harriet-bradley-115875-23487381/

Depressing unemployment figures announced this week highlight the distressing ­situation facing Britain’s working women.

More than a million are ­unemployed – the highest level for 23 years – and joblessness among women rose by 44,000 in the last three months alone.

Many have been cast aside in the attack on the public sector but there has also been a dip in the number of part-time jobs, often taken up by working mums.

Both qualified and unqualified women face struggles to find ­suitable work.

Those with excellent skills as administrators, carers and teachers are seeing their experience go to waste. A local government employee speaking on Radio 4’s Today programme had applied for 120 jobs but failed to get one.

The problem is leading to what is now being referred to as a “shecession” in which women are finding ­themselves on the front line in the fight for jobs. This battle is being made worse by the rapid increase in childcare costs for working mums who cannot rely on help from friends and family.

Some 32,000 women have already given up their jobs because of the soaring cost of care, ­Government figures showed.

Insurance giant Aviva estimates the average cost of full-time ­childcare is £385 a month, rising to £729 for children under two.

Added to this are expenses linked to work, such as transport costs that are also rapidly rising.

Aviva calculated that a partnered woman on the average part-time salary of £8,557, after tax and national insurance, and with children aged one and seven, would lose £98 a month. Working makes no economic sense.

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Uk Daily Telegraph.

Energy prices: 70pc of consumers will use credit to pay their gas and electric bills

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/consumertips/household-bills/8831245/Energy-prices-70pc-of-consumers-will-use-credit-to-pay-their-gas-and-electric-bills.html

Gas prices will continue to rise, industry bosses warn

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/consumertips/household-bills/8831627/Gas-prices-will-continue-to-rise-industry-bosses-warn.html

Gas and electricity prices will continue to rise for UK households regardless of Government intervention, industry bosses have warned.

The companies are not the Salvation Army. We expect them to earn respectable returns for their shareholders,”

Research released yesterday estimated that nearly a third of UK households face fuel poverty if the weather this winter is as harsh as predicted. According to Energyhelpline.com, households will have to pay an average of £564 to heat their houses from December to February if the period is as cold as expected. Fuel poverty is defined as when people have to spend more than 10 per cent of their income on their domestic fuel bills.

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Inflation hits 19-year high of 5.2pc on higher energy costs

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/8833346/Inflation-hits-19-year-high-of-5.2pc-on-higher-energy-costs.html

The retail price inflation (RPI), which includes more housing costs and is the benchmark for many wage deals, rose 5.6pc year-on-year, reaching its highest level since June 1991.

Bills for gas, electricity and other fuels rose 18.3pc on the year in September, while transport costs were up 12.8pc. Food prices were 6pc higher than last year.

High inflation has led to the biggest real terms fall in average incomes in 35 years and the longest slump in family finances on record as wages fail to keep pace with rising prices, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-15344297

But the rise in the cost of living highlights the risk of the Bank's latest move to revive the economy through further quantitative easing, which could help to stoke inflation.

Volcker is right: a little inflation is a dangerous thing

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jeremywarner/100012711/volcker-is-right-a-little-inflation-is-a-dangerous-thing/

No, inflation is never an economic panacea. Nor does it even help with the debt burden. If wages aren't matching inflation, then it is of no help in eroding the nominal value of household debt, and if taxes aren't keeping pace with inflation, then the same goes for government debt. Worse, many forms of government spending, most notably the bulk of benefit entitlements, are linked to inflation, so that we now have the absurdity of benefit claimants being better protected against price increases than wage earners.

These figures are not just uncomfortable for the Bank of England and the Government. They are a disaster. It took twenty years finally to exorcise the ghost of Britain's post war inflationary past, and to win credibility as a stable, low inflation economy. All that work is in danger of being thrown away

Edited by Shotoflight

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Buy a house. Go on - I dare you! :P

I will need an 8.9% pay rise just to stay still. :( I think I'm happy renting. Those that bought in the last 10 years maybe benefiting from low interest rates but they'll be getting hammered with this inflation.

On the plus side rent has dropped in the last 2 years. :rolleyes:

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I will need an 8.9% pay rise just to stay still. :( I think I'm happy renting. Those that bought in the last 10 years maybe benefiting from low interest rates but they'll be getting hammered with this inflation.

On the plus side rent has dropped in the last 2 years. :rolleyes:

And that's the point - inflation gets everyone. The uncertainty of employment the absence of wage inflation for those employed and the certainty of high prices all mitigate against the biggest purchase most people ever make, especially as even the mainstream media now recognise the earlier boom, current bust and prices continuing to fall at 15% pa - with another 36% to come if you heed Our Jim's analysis.

It must be really difficult, stressful and frustrating, for anyone with a young family trying to plan ahead or even make limited forward progress. And the prospects for the younger generation leaving school and pensioners living off savings is dire.

Wonder how many that are getting off light with mortgage interest payments (by pure chance) are overpaying rather than splurging it as a windfall, or simply using it to survive? How much better off will they be after another 2 or 3 yrs of this - and what will be the value of the biggest purchase they ever made or, as some like to call it, their pension?

How well insulated is our economy from a potentially large external 'setback' say Euro diffs?

Hard to believe this all started with hillbilly (sub prime) mortgages in the States, of which we have many examples here also.

Edited by Shotoflight

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Our Jim speaks.

Inflation bites as prices rise faster than incomes

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-15353056

The Retail Prices Index - which includes housing costs - rose from 5.2% to 5.6%, its highest level in more than 20 years.

Since 2007, when the current economic woes began, inflation has risen a whopping 15.5%. But wages have only increased at about half that rate.

Specific key items have seen prices shoot up since then. Food is up by 28%. Household energy bills are up by a quarter.

There is some comfort in the knowledge that this latest rise in inflation is unlikely to prompt a rise in interest rates.

The UK economy is currently so weak and the Bank of England expects inflation to fall next year.

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Heaven knows I'm miserable now

Inflation pushes UK Misery Index to highest since Black Wednesday

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/economics-blog/2011/oct/18/inflation-misery-index-black-wednesday?newsfeed=true

If you want to know why the British economy is so depressed, you need to look no further than the so-called Misery Index. This is what you get when you add together the unemployment rate and the inflation rate, and after today's announcement of a big rise in the cost of living in September the Misery Index is at its highest level since the immediate aftermath of Black Wednesday in 1992.

The gap between prices and earnings – almost 4 percentage points if the RPI is used as the measure of inflation – shows that real incomes have shrunk over the past year at the fastest rate since the early 1980s.

The high level of the Misery Index heralds a dire winter ahead. Unless consumers sit and shiver without the central heating on, which some of them will, they have no choice but to fork out more for domestic energy. That leaves less to spend on other items, which is why today's inflation figures saw a fall in the cost of clothes and shoes. The special factors that depressed growth in the second quarter of 2011 may unwind in the third quarter, leading to slightly higher growth but the final three months of this year and the first quarter of 2012 will be tough.

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Hard to believe this all started with hillbilly (sub prime) mortgages in the States, of which we have many examples here also.

Have you heard the theory that it's all due to $100 oil?

It seems the 2008 crash was due to the spike in oil price, since the world economy simply can't cope with that price. Recession then caused a drop in oil price, followed by recovery.

Now it's back up again... double dip.

We'll have to see if the pattern repeats. And repeats.

Edited by yadayada

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Heaven knows I'm miserable now

Inflation pushes UK Misery Index to highest since Black Wednesday

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/economics-blog/2011/oct/18/inflation-misery-index-black-wednesday?newsfeed=true

If you want to know why the British economy is so depressed, you need to look no further than the so-called Misery Index. This is what you get when you add together the unemployment rate and the inflation rate, and after today's announcement of a big rise in the cost of living in September the Misery Index is at its highest level since the immediate aftermath of Black Wednesday in 1992.

The gap between prices and earnings – almost 4 percentage points if the RPI is used as the measure of inflation – shows that real incomes have shrunk over the past year at the fastest rate since the early 1980s.

The high level of the Misery Index heralds a dire winter ahead. Unless consumers sit and shiver without the central heating on, which some of them will, they have no choice but to fork out more for domestic energy. That leaves less to spend on other items, which is why today's inflation figures saw a fall in the cost of clothes and shoes. The special factors that depressed growth in the second quarter of 2011 may unwind in the third quarter, leading to slightly higher growth but the final three months of this year and the first quarter of 2012 will be tough.

Been thinking about this thread for a while and trying to put it into some proper context. In my simplistic view, I've concluded that as a society (particularly here in NI where we spent the last 30 years killing each other) we don't deserve to expect our current standard of living to be maintained. We can't afford it and it's now bleeding obvious that we havn't done so for many years. Seems to me that today's consumption driven throw away society often behaves as a collective of spoilt brats with some sort of entitlement belief to a certain standard of living supported by a nanny state.

Wind back just 2 generations and I recall living is a semi-detached house, with no TV, one radio, no central heating and one second hand car. Foreign holidays - don't be silly and sweets were something you got on a Sunday. Designer clothes - what were they? Both my parents were working full-time in secure average pay employment.

So for me all this complaining about living standards (in the west generally) needs to put into some perspective - we havn't earned it so why do we think we are entitled to it? There's going to be real pain in trying to get the next generation to pay for the debts this one racked up.

So quit complaining Shotoflight - you never had it so fecking good :rolleyes:

P.S. How do you get so much time to post in the day during the week, but never at the weekend. Ah got it now, you work weekends and are off all week ;)

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Been thinking about this thread for a while and trying to put it into some proper context. In my simplistic view, I've concluded that as a society (particularly here in NI where we spent the last 30 years killing each other) we don't deserve to expect our current standard of living to be maintained. We can't afford it and it's now bleeding obvious that we havn't done so for many years. Seems to me that today's consumption driven throw away society often behaves as a collective of spoilt brats with some sort of entitlement belief to a certain standard of living supported by a nanny state.

Wind back just 2 generations and I recall living is a semi-detached house, with no TV, one radio, no central heating and one second hand car. Foreign holidays - don't be silly and sweets were something you got on a Sunday. Designer clothes - what were they? Both my parents were working full-time in secure average pay employment.

So for me all this complaining about living standards (in the west generally) needs to put into some perspective - we havn't earned it so why do we think we are entitled to it? There's going to be real pain in trying to get the next generation to pay for the debts this one racked up.

So quit complaining Shotoflight - you never had it so fecking good :rolleyes:

P.S. How do you get so much time to post in the day during the week, but never at the weekend. Ah got it now, you work weekends and are off all week ;)

I agree with you entirely and I'm not complaining one little bit. This thread is just an antidote to the 'houses have never been more affordable/now is the time to buy guff'. And of course the politicians green shoots waffle which, strangely enough has been absent in recent months. Even they can't spin things. Just a little insight into the real world away from confidence building and rose tinted cr*p. And to suggest, evidentially, that current house prices are unsustainable.

I can match your story of hardship - vinegar in the HP sauce to make it go further - fried potato leftovers - hand down clothes and furniture from relatives - eat what was put in front of you or starve. This is my third recession having gained very poorly paid employment, and been grateful for it, when 3 million others couldn't.

The sense of entitlement and misplaced optimism you allude to is why thousands are living in houses they cannot afford and getting their mortgages paid for them. I am wary of debt, a realist and have always (tried to) live within my means - which is why I am not one of them and have done without a lot of things many, especially younger ones, 'take for granted'.

So no - no complaints whatsoever from me except that many are now paying the price for something they had no involvement in. And will do for a long time to come.

My current work situation is a bit mad. Posting on the night shift now. Will try to up my weekend input to keep you happy - can you take more doom & gloom? :o

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I agree with you entirely and I'm not complaining one little bit. This thread is just an antidote to the 'houses have never been more affordable/now is the time to buy guff'. And of course the politicians green shoots waffle which, strangely enough has been absent in recent months. Even they can't spin things. Just a little insight into the real world away from confidence building and rose tinted cr*p. And to suggest, evidentially, that current house prices are unsustainable.

I can match your story of hardship - vinegar in the HP sauce to make it go further - fried potato leftovers - hand down clothes and furniture from relatives - eat what was put in front of you or starve. This is my third recession having gained very poorly paid employment, and been grateful for it, when 3 million others couldn't.

The sense of entitlement and misplaced optimism you allude to is why thousands are living in houses they cannot afford and getting their mortgages paid for them. I am wary of debt, a realist and have always (tried to) live within my means - which is why I am not one of them and have done without a lot of things many, especially younger ones, 'take for granted'.

So no - no complaints whatsoever from me except that many are now paying the price for something they had no involvement in. And will do for a long time to come.

My current work situation is a bit mad. Posting on the night shift now. Will try to up my weekend input to keep you happy - can you take more doom & gloom? :o

My post was deliberately tongue in cheek just to wind things up a bit but the underlying sentiment seems valid to me.

Can't take much more of all the doom and gloom - gonna have to spend some cash soon on a house before the financial system collapses. :huh:

Enjoy the rest of your shift - doing nights is a hard grind.

P.S. we didn't do the vinegar thing, hadn't any sauce :lol: and 'there were 4 of us lived int shoe box, got up half six int morning, licked road clean with tongue (you remember who did that sketch?)

Edit: Found it - it was a Monty Python sketch - see here for a laugh http://www.phespirit.info/montypython/four_yorkshiremen.htm

Edited by lolacarrascal

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My post was deliberately tongue in cheek just to wind things up a bit but the underlying sentiment seems valid to me.

Can't take much more of all the doom and gloom - gonna have to spend some cash soon on a house before the financial system collapses. :huh:

Enjoy the rest of your shift - doing nights is a hard grind.

P.S. we didn't do the vinegar thing, hadn't any sauce :lol: and 'there were 4 of us lived int shoe box, got up half six int morning, licked road clean with tongue (you remember who did that sketch?)

Edit: Found it - it was a Monty Python sketch - see here for a laugh http://www.phespirit.info/montypython/four_yorkshiremen.htm

Ahhh, the good old days - brings back fond memories.

What ever happened to bunk beds?

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I agree with you entirely and I'm not complaining one little bit. This thread is just an antidote to the 'houses have never been more affordable/now is the time to buy guff'. And of course the politicians green shoots waffle which, strangely enough has been absent in recent months. Even they can't spin things. Just a little insight into the real world away from confidence building and rose tinted cr*p. And to suggest, evidentially, that current house prices are unsustainable.

I 2nd that ...

All the facts suggest that Mr & Mrs Average in 2011 have it financially tighter now than what their parents generation did. I agree, some of them have only themselves to blame by supporting a false lifestyle with credit but others have simply just got caught up in the mess. I dont believe that everyone demands a lifestyle of royalty.

Yes there are some who think that a holiday to Florida is a must, designer clothes and material items are what they may base their lifestyle on. For these ppl perhaps Tesco's finest isn't quite so special enough for them. These are the folk who sooner or later will run out of credit. I don't class them as Mr & Mrs Average ... in fact I could think of something a whole lot more appropriate for them.

Mr & Mrs Average are the biggest losers in todays financial mess. Get up, go to work (in fixed employment if your lucky) and barely make enough to feed your kids (if you can afford them), pay for the childcare costs, heat your house and pay your MTG repayments or ridiculously high rent. If you decide to buy a house then you can snap up a shoebox Townhouse for 5/6 times your salary. If you bought 3/4 years ago then perhaps you have borrowed almost 10 times your income ... are these ppl all spoilt brats??

Compare that to the Benefit busters, who lie in their bed's, claim housing benefit, Income support, Tax credits, DLA, incapacity benefit and Carers allowance ... and stick 2 fingers up to Mr & Mrs Average who bother to try and contribute anything to society other than pro-creating children that the state will support, and reward the parents .. umm ... sorry single parent (supposedly) for doing so.

For the record we had 2 sets of bunk beds in my house, had the odd holiday here and there and got by ok. I had an 'Mr & Mrs Average upbringing' ... it was great and I dont expect anything more for myself

Edited by tinbin

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Although I believe mr and mrs average will be struggling,I refuse to believe that people taking a holiday abroad is living beyond their means or pursuing a false lifestyle. Yes the older generation might have had it tough in their day and weren't brought on holidays very often, but were flights to Spain available for less than £100 per person back then? I don't think so.

Times have changed and so have the relative luxuries.what were reserved for the affluent a few decades ago,are now common place to even people on the lowest of wages. And available without using credit...if people know how to save for a small period of time.

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Compare that to the Benefit busters, who lie in their bed's, claim housing benefit, Income support, Tax credits, DLA, incapacity benefit and Carers allowance ... and stick 2 fingers up to Mr & Mrs Average who bother to try and contribute anything to society other than pro-creating children that the state will support, and reward the parents .. umm ... sorry single parent (supposedly) for doing so.

This is what really pisses me off! If the government want to claw back some money I would they rather they invest more in trying to get quash these lazy, useless scum bags, rather than shitting on Mr and Mrs average! Every town has a bunch of losers who've never done a tap, never intend to and breed like rabbits knowing that the tax payer will pick up the tab for there scumbag sprogs (who generally follow in the familys "benefit seeking" footsteps).

Mr and Mrs average are in a crap situation Take the typical example of this - Mr and mrs average both work and earn an average wage with 2 children in childcare. Mr average decides to work a few saturdays every month to bring in some additional money. Mr Osborne decides to reward his sacrifice by cutting their tax credits by an equal amount to what he's earned in overtime. Thanks George - this will give you some extra money to give some scumbag a deep fat fryer or some other ******** item that the scum bags decide to claim for (they all seem to know every last entitlement). Then Mr average gets made redundant. He'll get pestered and shit upon by the dole crew for claiming the minimum whilst the scumbags are picking up their weekly alcohol allowance.

If Mr and Mrs average manage to make their way through life and pay off a mortgage, set aside some savings (which of course hes paid tax on), they can feel assured that the government will look after them if they have to go into care. They can expect the government will say f**k you we're selling your house and taking your savings to pay for your care - why should you be entitled to this care for free, thats only an option for the benefits crew!!

What's the point? f**k buying a house, f**k having a job, f**K the pension, f**k the savings lets all go on the dole!!

Rant over!

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  • 294 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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