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Dave Beans

Driver Scarpered After An Accident

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A family member's car was hit by some git the end of last week and did a scarper. The driver's number plate was noted down by someone at the scene, and another witness said that they would come forward if necessary. It was reported to the insurance co. and then we went down the cop shop to do the same. Apparently its moved to the collisions unit, where a letter is sent to the "perpetrator", and they have 28 days to respond. If they admit it, will they be prosecuted? If they deny it, I take it the cops will go to the witness for verification. Will that make the punishment worse if they are found guilty?. Its just a bloody hassle, and if we lose our excess over this (hopefully not), I think we'll be able to go after them in a civil court...

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A family member's car was hit by some git the end of last week and did a scarper. The driver's number plate was noted down by someone at the scene, and another witness said that they would come forward if necessary. It was reported to the insurance co. and then we went down the cop shop to do the same. Apparently its moved to the collisions unit, where a letter is sent to the "perpetrator", and they have 28 days to respond. If they admit it, will they be prosecuted? If they deny it, I take it the cops will go to the witness for verification. Will that make the punishment worse if they are found guilty?. Its just a bloody hassle, and if we lose our excess over this (hopefully not), I think we'll be able to go after them in a civil court...

Firstly whack the other persons number plate in here to make sure it's insured: http://ownvehicle.askmid.com/

Secondly, it will be up to the police whether to prosecute or not - however does it really matter as it will not affect you and you probably won't even find out? The only issue is whether he accepts liability and is insured. If he doesn't accept liability your insurance co will take the battle on.

Personally at this stage I would write your own statement, of exactly what happened with the time and date. Also refer to google maps (so the insurance co, and.or police know exactly what happened) and photos of your car.

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A family member's car was hit by some git the end of last week and did a scarper. The driver's number plate was noted down by someone at the scene, and another witness said that they would come forward if necessary. It was reported to the insurance co. and then we went down the cop shop to do the same. Apparently its moved to the collisions unit, where a letter is sent to the "perpetrator", and they have 28 days to respond. If they admit it, will they be prosecuted? If they deny it, I take it the cops will go to the witness for verification. Will that make the punishment worse if they are found guilty?. Its just a bloody hassle, and if we lose our excess over this (hopefully not), I think we'll be able to go after them in a civil court...

I had something similar happen to me about 12 years ago - car drove into the back of me at the traffic lights. I was at the back of the queue and I heard the screech of a clapped out Fiat with 2 chavs in the front seat. Crunch. I got out to swap details and the feckers screeched off through red light and away.

I got their number, as did a witness, and I reported it to the cops. Turned out that the banger had been bought from a scrap yard with a false ID. They just re-scrapped it apparently, and there was nowt that I could do. My 8 year old Astra was a write off sadly. I didn't claim or tell my insurers I just bought a new car as the Astra would have paid out less than the cost of increased premiums. Unlike the 2 chavs I did have to go to the cop shop with my MoT and insurance cert as I'd reported being involved in an accident, which was annoying.

What I should have done, I was told later, was to claim I'd been injured (e.g. whiplash) so that they would have to investigate further and I could have made a fraudulent injury claim. Stupid honest me eh?

Another anecdote is that an 18yo I know had to sell his little Peugeot after he passed his test in it because the insurance was £3500! A 'chav' (his words) bought it for a few hundred quid and it was confiscated and crushed a few weeks later for being driven sans insurance. The fine for no insurance was a lot less than the £3500 for the insurance I guess.

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My sister had the exact opposite.

She ran into the back of a guy at the lights and nicely rippled his rear bumper.

He got out f'ing and blinding then instead of swapping particulars just got back in his car and drove off. Presumably uninsured.

My sisters car wasn't too badly damaged.. I guess she was pretty lucky :huh:

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Firstly whack the other persons number plate in here to make sure it's insured: http://ownvehicle.askmid.com/

Secondly, it will be up to the police whether to prosecute or not - however does it really matter as it will not affect you and you probably won't even find out? The only issue is whether he accepts liability and is insured. If he doesn't accept liability your insurance co will take the battle on.

Personally at this stage I would write your own statement, of exactly what happened with the time and date. Also refer to google maps (so the insurance co, and.or police know exactly what happened) and photos of your car.

Will do...the insurance company let slip that the car was "insured"..the coppers said that they shouldn't have said anything...

Out of interest, what sort of punishment could they gave them?

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Just had some kid go into the rear of my car last week bumper gone and a small dent to the boot lid. Hewas a nice kid and insured but I offered not to go through the insurance as he was young and I wasn't injured. After a call from his dad I agreed that I would and went and got a quote which was around a £1,000 odd :ph34r:.

Spoke to his dad and agreed that he should go through the insurance as the cost of both repairs would not increase his premiums by over a £1000. He admitted all liability, his insurer called today and are sorting everything out, even offered a decent sized courtesy car not some Matiz.

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Just had some kid go into the rear of my car last week bumper gone and a small dent to the boot lid. Hewas a nice kid and insured but I offered not to go through the insurance as he was young and I wasn't injured. After a call from his dad I agreed that I would and went and got a quote which was around a £1,000 odd :ph34r:.

Spoke to his dad and agreed that he should go through the insurance as the cost of both repairs would not increase his premiums by over a £1000. He admitted all liability, his insurer called today and are sorting everything out, even offered a decent sized courtesy car not some Matiz.

Are most courtesy cars given out utterly pathetic? When I smacked my 2.4l Alfa about three/four years ago, I was left with a poxy Micra for three weeks...

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Are most courtesy cars given out utterly pathetic? When I smacked my 2.4l Alfa about three/four years ago, I was left with a poxy Micra for three weeks...

The ones I have been given on occasion have been shit, that last one was a Matiz that was particularly shit (quite effective for honing your blip the throttle to change down gear skills though). Old man Miyagi once got a 4x4 courtesy car when he was smacked in the rear in his 4x4 after he insisted he needed one, presumably so he could ride over some random curb somewhere :rolleyes:

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Some local drunk halfwit drove into my parked car about two years ago. My wife said, someone's just crashed into your car, as I was on my way out, my neighbour (a policewoman) rang to tell me that someone had crashed into my car. By the time I had got outside, the two lads in question, standing outside their car, looking at the damage to my car had been challenged by my wife and asked "Have you just crashed into our car?" answered no, noticed people were gathering and got back in their car and drove off. My policewoman neighbour knew the two guys and one of their mum's lived within 100 yards. Within 2 miniutes a police car turned up, apparently they had been chased form the local pub after a fight and driven their car back drunk. Several exciting minutes later of lots of loud car driving around our rural area the police turned up and said they had lost them. We suggested they check the local farmyard where it would be easy to hide a car.

Upshot is, no insurance, no interest from police, comment from insurance company was to bump my premium by £400 for mentioning the incident. No "proof" who was driving. When I asked insurance company person what the point of paying insurance premiums was, received no useful answer.

Later rang up insurance company to strike any mention of the incident from the record they returned the £400 additional premium.

I decided that I would go with the legal minimum insurance as it obviously is not there to protect me, 3rd party only is bizarrely more expensive than fully comp.

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Similar anecdote from me. One afternoon in 2002, a knackered old BMW turned right out of a side street in Middlesbrough without looking, straight into the side of my car. None of the five Asian-looking occpuants spoke any English (more accurately, either they didn't or they pretended not to). I rang the police on my mobile, but while I was waiting for them, the Asians simply reversed their car out of the wreckage of mine and drove off, smashed up bumper trailing on the ground. When the police arrived I explained all this and commented that it can't be hard to find a car in that state being driven around. They noted it all, gave me a crime number and waited for the RAC to show up and tow away my now-written-off car. A few days later my insurer reported that the police had checked out the BMW's registration, and that according to the DVLA's records, it had been scrapped three years previously. At that point the police closed their investigation, stating that if the accident didn't involve any injury or death, it is not their policy to investigate such accidents further. So much for Ray Mallon and zero tolerance!

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Well I do hope you are all lucky in love, because you all seem very unlucky on the road! :blink:

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You'll get more justice going to your local criminals now than going to the Police if that makes sense.

It's only going to get worse, the Police, in general now, are not a Police force, it's not really their fault entirely, blame the government, liberal attitudes towards crime, the courts and the societal changes which have changed the face of Britain over the last fifty years.

Do police and the public sector take an oath of silence?

Used to work with a part time cop in the office, he was always mad at lefty courts and sentencing. Seems the police in general dislike the CPS for that reason.

Same with every single person ive met whose worked in public and private sector. All have the same story of the largesse, corruption, old boys network endemic in the public sector.

But they never seem to get the politicians and media involved, so the whole shambles continues.

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Similar anecdote from me. One afternoon in 2002, a knackered old BMW turned right out of a side street in Middlesbrough without looking, straight into the side of my car. None of the five Asian-looking occpuants spoke any English (more accurately, either they didn't or they pretended not to). ...

It's intersting that our anecdotals are from 10ish years agon and we both lost our cars. Note my second anecdote from 2011 about the unisured kid who got his car confiscated and crushed. Maybe the cops nabbed him via ANPR technology and now unisured and/or 'scrapped' cars are much more difficult to drive around in.

Although I know someone who's common or garden Focus was cloned by someone in an identical Focus 200 miles away (I assume they had some way of making dodgy number plates?).

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It's intersting that our anecdotals are from 10ish years agon and we both lost our cars. Note my second anecdote from 2011 about the unisured kid who got his car confiscated and crushed. Maybe the cops nabbed him via ANPR technology and now unisured and/or 'scrapped' cars are much more difficult to drive around in.

When I first read about ANPR my immediate thought was that it would invoke the law of unintended consequences by encouraging criminals to drive around on false plates. Though that wasn't exactly what happened in my case, which was that the owners of the BMW had told the DVLA that they'd scrapped it when they hadn't, presumably in an attempt to to take the vehicle out of 'the system'. Presumably, if ANPR had been around and in use at the time, it would have caught them, because it would have detected that the registration did not match any currently valid one.

Although I know someone who's common or garden Focus was cloned by someone in an identical Focus 200 miles away (I assume they had some way of making dodgy number plates?).

And that, of course, is how they're going to get the false plates. If you wish to drive a red Mondeo around undetected by the system, then making up false plates bearing the same registration of another red Mondeo is the way to do it, because the ANPR system will detect the passing vehicle and tell the machine's operator (presumably someone sitting in a police car) that the vehicle is what it should be. About the only way this could go wrong is you are unlucky enough to copy the number plate of an uninsured and/or MOT-less car, or if the registered owner is already wanted by the fuzz for other reasons.

IMO the only way you're going to stop this is by exemplary sentences analogous to those imposed for carrying guns and knives around, e.g. impose a lifetime driving ban on anyone caught driving a car with false number plates, regardless of whether any other offence was committed.

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Anyway, about 3 months later I saw the car in the local night club car park by the end of the night the tyres of the car had broken glass placed under each wheel, no idea how that happened! ;)

Never saw the car parked in the night club again, I wonder why.

Caltrops!

Caltrops.jpg

post-11094-0-92793700-1314805073_thumb.jpg

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When I first read about ANPR my immediate thought was that it would invoke the law of unintended consequences by encouraging criminals to drive around on false plates. Though that wasn't exactly what happened in my case, which was that the owners of the BMW had told the DVLA that they'd scrapped it when they hadn't, presumably in an attempt to to take the vehicle out of 'the system'. Presumably, if ANPR had been around and in use at the time, it would have caught them, because it would have detected that the registration did not match any currently valid one.

And that, of course, is how they're going to get the false plates. If you wish to drive a red Mondeo around undetected by the system, then making up false plates bearing the same registration of another red Mondeo is the way to do it, because the ANPR system will detect the passing vehicle and tell the machine's operator (presumably someone sitting in a police car) that the vehicle is what it should be. About the only way this could go wrong is you are unlucky enough to copy the number plate of an uninsured and/or MOT-less car, or if the registered owner is already wanted by the fuzz for other reasons.

IMO the only way you're going to stop this is by exemplary sentences analogous to those imposed for carrying guns and knives around, e.g. impose a lifetime driving ban on anyone caught driving a car with false number plates, regardless of whether any other offence was committed.

Is ANPR fitted to all cop cars, or is it just fitted to traffic police cars?

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Is ANPR fitted to all cop cars, or is it just fitted to traffic police cars?

Mostly traffic cars but some specialist division cars have it too. It's also on strategic points throughout the motorway network.

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Mostly traffic cars but some specialist division cars have it too. It's also on strategic points throughout the motorway network.

I went to an IT presentation about 5 years ago (problems of data storage of the sheer volume of stuff produced by systems like this) and the guy giving it said that it was practically impossible to get into or out of any of our major cities without going through an ANPR 'checkpoint'.

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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