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Snugglybear

Ippr Report

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I don't think anyone's posted this yet. A report from the IPPR called "Surviving the Asian Century: Four steps to securing sustainable long-term economic growth in the UK"

http://www.ippr.org/images/media/files/publication/2011/08/surviving-the-asian-century_Aug2011_7872.pdf'>http://www.ippr.org/images/media/files/publication/2011/08/surviving-the-asian-century_Aug2011_7872.pdf

On the IPPR website http://www.ippr.org/

It's 58 pages so obviously I can't post the whole thing, but in the executive summary there is this paragraph.

..a closer look at comparative economic data suggests that the key weaknesses which characterised the UK economy throughout the 20th century – and made it more difficult at that time for British business to adjust to change and remain competitive in the global marketplace – still exist today. These underlying or ‘adaptation’ weaknesses – all relative to other major advanced economies – are (1) lower business investment, (2) a weaker skills base, (3) less innovative and productive firms, and (4) a smaller presence in the most vibrant emerging markets. Just as they have stymied our performance in the past, these problems are critically important today, and must be overcome if we are to adapt effectively to the geo-economic and technological changes underway and capitalise on the opportunities they present. The UK economy needs to be at the top of its game, and it is our view that the UK’s ability to address these challenges will determine its success or failure in the Asian century before us.

The report does propose policy solutions - pages 38 - 51

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We're printing our way to a recovery...

Exports bah who needs them when you have a magic printing press.

This time next year Rodney we'll be nonillion-21312312312312312321312256476876546587685678 aires.

Bread will cost nonillion-213123123123123123213122564768765465876856781 aires.

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I don't think anyone's posted this yet. A report from the IPPR called "Surviving the Asian Century: Four steps to securing sustainable long-term economic growth in the UK"

http://www.ippr.org/images/media/files/publication/2011/08/surviving-the-asian-century_Aug2011_7872.pdf'>http://www.ippr.org/images/media/files/publication/2011/08/surviving-the-asian-century_Aug2011_7872.pdf

On the IPPR website http://www.ippr.org/

It's 58 pages so obviously I can't post the whole thing, but in the executive summary there is this paragraph.

The report does propose policy solutions - pages 38 - 51

Thanks - interesting report.

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We're printing our way to a recovery...

Exports bah who needs them when you have a magic printing press.

Exactly, money printing is the new way forward, exporting is so yesteryear. House flipping, hamburger eating and money shuffling is the UK's economy. Leave manufacturing and exporting to the foolish Germans...

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I don't think anyone's posted this yet. A report from the IPPR called "Surviving the Asian Century: Four steps to securing sustainable long-term economic growth in the UK"

http://www.ippr.org/images/media/files/publication/2011/08/surviving-the-asian-century_Aug2011_7872.pdf'>http://www.ippr.org/images/media/files/publication/2011/08/surviving-the-asian-century_Aug2011_7872.pdf

On the IPPR website http://www.ippr.org/

It's 58 pages so obviously I can't post the whole thing, but in the executive summary there is this paragraph.

The report does propose policy solutions - pages 38 - 51

So now even left wing IPRR has realised that for UK to be competitive against Asian economy, it needs to upgrade it skills based.

Said nothing about bureaucracies and taxes though...

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A large part of the problem for the UK lies in the fact that investment has been increasingly

skewed towards financial services and property, rather than a more diverse range of

service and manufacturing sectors.

:lol:

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So now even left wing IPRR has realised that for UK to be competitive against Asian economy, it needs to upgrade it skills based.

Said nothing about bureaucracies and taxes though...

As has been pointed out time and time again, taxes are higher in Germany than in the UK, but Germany is an exporting powerhouse compared with the UK.

Germany also has plenty of regulation - of rents, for one thing.

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As has been pointed out time and time again, taxes are higher in Germany than in the UK, but

Are German taxes really higher though? In that does it include everything. And what do germans get back for it? For example UK extortion council tax pays for bin collection and government pensions and thats IT.

While there are many many many hidden and disguised taxes in the UK.

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Are German taxes really higher though? In that does it include everything. And what do germans get back for it? For example UK extortion council tax pays for bin collection and government pensions and thats IT.

While there are many many many hidden and disguised taxes in the UK.

Some figures:

German income tax

Up to €8,004 - 0%

€8,005 – €13,469 14% -24%

€13,470 - €52,881 24% - 42%.

€52,882 - €250,730 – 42%

above €250,730 – 45%

Solidarity tax

Up to €972, 0£ Then increases continuously until it reaches 5.5% when the annual income tax is €1,340.69

UK income tax

20% £0 - £37,400

40% over £37,400

50% over £150,000

Germany social security contributions

(Health insurance, nursing care insurance, pension insurance, unemployment insurance, accident insurance)

roughly 21% of pay

(Employers also contribute roughly 21% of pay)

UK NI

Horrendously complicated but 8% is a rough figure for those on the median wage

German VAT 19%

UK VAT 20%

Fuel duty

€0.4704 per litre for ultra-low sulphur Diesel and €0.6545 per litre for conventional unleaded petrol

£0.5895 per litre for everything

Having to compare Sterling and Euros makes things difficult.

I haven't included local taxes as obviously they vary between areas of both countries.

The number crunchers of the EU have tried to compare the 27 countries (as tax harmonisation is a stated aim of the EU) and have come up with what they call the Implicit Tax Rate on Consumption (which in Germany is 20% and in the UK is 18%) made up of things like VAT and various forms of duty e.g. fuel duty, and the Implicit Tax Rate on Labour (which in Germany is almost 40% and in the UK is 26%) made up of elements such as income tax and social security contributions. The Implicit Tax Rate on Capital is much higher in the UK at 46%, than Germany at 24%, but that is partly to do with some statistical anomalies - the ITR base does not capture the full extent of the taxable profits of financial companies and the UK figures allocate tax on all occupational and private pension benefits to capital income whereas for most other member states occupational pension benefits are allocated to transfer income of the non-employed.

Oh, and the Germans arguably do get more benefits, such as better pensions and care in old age.

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  • 338 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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