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More Than A Quarter Of A-Levels Awarded At Least An A

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/8707609/A-level-results-one-in-12-exam-entries-awarded-A.html

'Some 8.2 per cent of papers was awarded the top mark - a marginal increase of one percentage point compared with 2010 when the grade was introduced for the first time to reward exceptional candidates.

Data published by the Joint Council for Qualifications also showed more than a quarter of A-levels - 27 per cent - was awarded at least an A, the same as last year. It was the first time in 15 years that A-grades had plateaued although the number of top marks is still more than three times that in the early eighties.

The overall pass rate also increased to 97.8 per cent – the 29th year-on-year increase – triggering claims the A-level was now almost “impossible to fail”.

But exam boards insisted rises in A* grades and the overall pass-rate was "statistically insignificant" and performance at schools and colleges had largely flatlined this year.

But today’s figures show many students are already migrating to the tougher subjects valued by top universities and employers.

The sciences and maths continued to see some of the biggest increases in subject entries. But entries for critical thinking and general studies - often frowned upon by top universities - plummeted by 17 and 12 per cent respectively. '

nice to see kids are waking up and doing the sciences and maths.

but the whole system is a sham.I'd love to see a chart correlating increasing A levels passes with BoE money supply over the last thirty years.

Coincidence? or part of a societal yearning for collective delusion?

If we had a 97% pass rate for driving tests would you say it was a sham?

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The sciences and maths continued to see some of the biggest increases in subject entries. But entries for critical thinking and general studies - often frowned upon by top universities - plummeted by 17 and 12 per cent respectively.[/b] '

What's wrong with critical thinking? It sounds like it might be rather useful,

Peter.

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The overall pass rate also increased to 97.8 per cent – the 29th year-on-year increase – triggering claims the A-level was now almost "impossible to fail".

98% pass! So (if that's true) the A level is meaningless, even rioters can pass them and get their 'social mobility'.

I wouldn't have guessed that % , even if it was in a multiple choice question.

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The sciences and maths continued to see some of the biggest increases in subject entries. But entries for critical thinking and general studies - often frowned upon by top universities - plummeted by 17 and 12 per cent respectively.[/b] '

My 2 both did Gen studies in addition to 3 As - school made them do it, in order to cover things they weren't doing at A level.

I scoffed at it - until I saw the paper my elder smuggled out. Certainly not the doss I'd imagined - gave me quite a shock.

Mind you I gather the school had picked the hardest board on purpose - they do vary so much.

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Maths was never my strongpoint but it looks like the pass rate wil be 106.7 % in 6 years time if standards continue to improve at this rate

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Just looked on the Mail website - their piece on A level results has six photographs and not a single male in any of them.

Amazing.

Only pretty/fit girls celebrating their success are allowed. Boys and Plain Janes are losers!

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I went to a good secondary school back in the 80's and came equal second out of 150 with A,B,C for my A-levels. One person got straight A's and went straight to Oxbridge.

I guess we have Aflation.

May as well use Bell-curve grading each year.

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I went to a good secondary school back in the 80's and came equal second out of 150 with A,B,C for my A-levels. One person got straight A's and went straight to Oxbridge.

I guess we have Aflation.

May as well use Bell-curve grading each year.

Theres a problem right there.

Are we to be teaching people so they have skills and abilities, or are we teaching people to arbitary levels of difficulty just to keep a managerialist system going?

To say theres a pyramid structure to society and therefore we should exclude enormous percentages of the population from anything important kinda shows the pyramid structure for the balls that it is, doesn't it?

We don't arbitarily exclude 80% of people from driving......

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What most of you forget over the years access to a level subjects has become easier, there seems to be a major increase since the arrival of the internet, the books are better written, so the results are better.

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What's wrong with critical thinking? It sounds like it might be rather useful,

Peter.

What is critical thinking?

EDIT: is it posting on HPC?

Edited by Redcellar

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What most of you forget over the years access to a level subjects has become easier, there seems to be a major increase since the arrival of the internet, the books are better written, so the results are better.

I wonder how this relates to increased grades. Oh yes, plagiarism ;)

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What's wrong with critical thinking? It sounds like it might be rather useful,

True. But in the context, it also sounds like it might be a euphemism.

I think it was this time last year I saw some grade-inflation stats going back many years. It showed 8% getting "A*", compared to 8% getting "A" in my time, so there's a certain equivalence. Still just as useless for distinguishing the brains from the merely not-totally-thick.

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I think they freely admitted that the A Level was devalued when they introduced the ridiculous A* grade.

It just means that A* becomes A, A becomes B etc etc...

What will happen when as many people are acheiving A* grades as were acheiving A grades before 2010 - A**?

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Maths was never my strongpoint but it looks like the pass rate wil be 106.7 % in 6 years time if standards continue to improve at this rate

Don't knock it! You just reminded me of the chemistry exam where I got 103%, 'cos the teacher had put in too many questions or summat.

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What most of you forget over the years access to a level subjects has become easier, there seems to be a major increase since the arrival of the internet, the books are better written, so the results are better.

Yep. With so much more and richer resources, today's youth jolly well should be better-educated than older generations.

The problem comes from the dual nature of the exam system. If it's there to measure "X has achieved some minimum standard of competence" (like a driving test) then an ever-rising pass rate is a Good Thing. But if it's there to distinguish the sheep from the goats and give young folks a motivation and a sense of accomplishment then it's a dismal failure.

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Oh dear, not this BS again. It ultimately boils down to the UK youth being reasonably cleaver and talented, but being double crossed by a self-destructing Capitalist system.

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Just looked on the Mail website - their piece on A level results has six photographs and not a single male in any of them.

Amazing.

Several months prior to the results coming out these schools contact certain journo's and provide photo's of the prettiest girls, ensuring lots of positive publicity for the school.

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Personally I'm of the opinion that General Studies should be compulsory.

When I took it in the mid-1990's it consisted of 2 x 3 hour papers covering maths, science,a foreign language, general knowledge and 4 essays on a wide variety of topics.

You can't revise for it so it is a true measure of your knowledge of a range of topics not of your short term memory.

I know lots of intelligent people who got straight A's in maths, sciences etc who got C's or worse in general studies.

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Oh and does anyone else find themselves screaming at their radios when some representative of some commercial lobbying body comes on and says "we still aren't finding people with the skills to work in our businesses"

Well how about you train your employees at your own expense instead of expecting the state to do it for you you hypocritical "small government except for stuff that benefits us" f*cktards!

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I don't get the General Studies thing. When I did it in the mid 90's it was so simple it was embarrassing. I was doing 2 Maths A Levels at the time and the maths question in the General Studies was way below a GCSE level. I really don't think I'm exaggerating by saying it was very close to primary school level.

On the grades, what many people (including the press) seem to miss out is that all of these exams are standardised. They have to be as the fluctuation between the difficulty of the paper would be much, much larger than the fluctuation in a certain year's ability. So they are already on a bell curve (normal distribution) and the exam boards (or possibly the government?) decide what percentage of pupils to give each grade.

The kids might be getting better, they might be getting worse. The number of A grades only shows us the number of A grades the govt/exam board have decided to give out.

Edited by 57percent

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