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Celebrity Knife Catching With Lord Sugar

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Makes a change.. Usually he's SELLING overpriced rubbish

I thought he shifted his emphasis into property development?

He's probably perfect in the Apprentice series, but I wouldn't invest in his businesses myself (not that I have anything to invest)!

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I need to look into past history of similar banks in countries which were part nationalised, RBS, LLOY. There are some 50billion+ shares in issue for each of these banks, which is huge.

What are the possible outcomes ?

1. Bank profits in future are used to buy back shares, bringing the shares in issue to a more reasonable level.

2. Banks are broken up, share holders are left with the "bad" bank. Then go to 3rd outcome.

3. Full nationalisaton. Share holders receive nothing.

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If there was an honestly good investment opportunity do you thinsk these banks and media companies would tell you about it? No, they would invest in it themselves with their own money. Which for the banks their money is essentially unlimited with the fractional reserve banking.

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I had an imaginery punt with £500 on RBS shares at 50p about a year ago, these would be 50% down now. Who knows how low these can go. Shares can go to zero.

Never buy stock when it makes a new lower low. Ever.

Edited by Money Spinner

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This is the guy who wanted to buy big in to Woolworths weeks before it went pop.

Even if he was just after the commercial property, he would have had his ass handed to him.

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I need to look into past history of similar banks in countries which were part nationalised, RBS, LLOY. There are some 50billion+ shares in issue for each of these banks, which is huge.

What are the possible outcomes ?

1. Bank profits in future are used to buy back shares, bringing the shares in issue to a more reasonable level.

2. Banks are broken up, share holders are left with the "bad" bank. Then go to 3rd outcome.

3. Full nationalisaton. Share holders receive nothing.

Have any big banks ever been nationalised in this way?

In the UK we've had several major bank failures B&B, NR, RBS, HBoS (which will probably become an even bigger failure when it takes Lloyds under). Has there been anything like this in any other nation? Is the Japanese experience comparable? If so the Japanese zombie banks area still zombies 20 years after the event.

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http://ftalphaville.ft.com/blog/2011/08/15/653411/celebrity-knife-catching/

Lord_Sugar Lord Sugar

'Bank shares seem too low,I bought LLoyds RBS and Barclays Friday. Don't follow me I'm no expert.Take professional advise if u fancy a punt;'

brave call.

Perhaps he should have taken professional advice first?

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I need to look into past history of similar banks in countries which were part nationalised, RBS, LLOY. There are some 50billion+ shares in issue for each of these banks, which is huge.

What are the possible outcomes ?

1. Bank profits in future are used to buy back shares, bringing the shares in issue to a more reasonable level.

2. Banks are broken up, share holders are left with the "bad" bank. Then go to 3rd outcome.

3. Full nationalisaton. Share holders receive nothing.

Whichever means the tax payer getting f&cked over most.

Taxpayers being shareholders at the moment...

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3. Full nationalisaton. Share holders receive nothing.

Is this what happened when private companies were nationalised after WW II?

The owners of the coal mines, steel works, airlines, railways, and so on had their businesses expropriated. I always thought they were compensated although I must confess I've never looked into it. I'll do a bit of googling later to try and find out.

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What words of wisom does he think that the general public are going to get from getting professional advice?

The professionals are clueless anyway, and the ones who do have some ideas, just lie to get more comissions.

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I love The Apprentice and it wouldn't be the same without Mr. Sugar (I won't call him Lord Sugar as he was given the title by a traitor to this country) but let's not forget he's been bankrupt.

Twice.

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Is this what happened when private companies were nationalised after WW II?

The owners of the coal mines, steel works, airlines, railways, and so on had their businesses expropriated. I always thought they were compensated although I must confess I've never looked into it. I'll do a bit of googling later to try and find out.

I think the post ww2 nationalisations would have been different as in that case the companies still had a value. So the share holders would have been paid out a pre determined probably non negotiable sum per share. Although I don't know either I'm making assumptions.

I do know with B&B and northern rock the shareholders got nothing. I think there was an option to apply for compensation but iirc they were ruled against after an appeal.

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I love The Apprentice and it wouldn't be the same without Mr. Sugar (I won't call him Lord Sugar as he was given the title by a traitor to this country) but let's not forget he's been bankrupt.

Twice.

He remains a cockney barrow boy who got lucky once and has been dining out on it ever since

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His tweet is meaningless without context.

Has he bought £1000 worth, £1million, £100m?

How much in relation to his net worth? 0.01%, 10%, 200%?

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His tweet is meaningless without context.

Has he bought £1000 worth, £1million, £100m?

How much in relation to his net worth? 0.01%, 10%, 200%?

For a man heavily into property, buying banks seems an odd trade.

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If there was an honestly good investment opportunity do you thinsk these banks and media companies would tell you about it? No, they would invest in it themselves with their own money. Which for the banks their money is essentially unlimited with the fractional reserve banking.

You might find this interesting.. Linky

2011-08-10	Barclays	Sir M.D. Rake	 BUY	5,345 @ 185.60p	9,920	N/A2011-08-04	Barclays	S.J. Fraser	 BUY	25,000 @ 209.53p	52,383	N/A2011-08-02	Barclays	M. Agius	 BUY	115,660 @ 215.50p	249,247	N/A

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he also bought 4% in Woolworths before it collapsed

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/oct/11/woolworths-retail

Alan Sugar buys stake in troubled Woolies

• TV entrepreneur acquires nearly 4% of retailer

• Property portfolio may have attracted reality star

Actually that deal didn't go through, as he was buying the Woolies shares from an Icelandic bank that collapsed before the deal could be completed. Strange but true. He was saved from his own incompetent buying decisions by an Icelandic bank that had made even worse ones.

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he also bought 4% in Woolworths before it collapsed

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/oct/11/woolworths-retail

Alan Sugar buys stake in troubled Woolies

• TV entrepreneur acquires nearly 4% of retailer

• Property portfolio may have attracted reality star

No he didn't.....

Sir Alan Sugar's high-profile deal for Woolworths sours

He has hired, fired and reduced dozens of budding entrepreneurs to tears as the host of BBC TV's The Apprentice. And now Sir Alan Sugar has been left red-faced after it emerged that his highly publicised acquisition of shares in Woolworths has collapsed.

Woolworths disclosed that Sir Alan never received the stock worth £2 million that he ordered nine days ago because the seller “was unable to deliver the shares”.

It is thought the vendor was either Landsbanki or Kaupthing, two of the Icelandic banks whose assets have been frozen or placed into administration by the Icelandic and British Governments in the past fortnight.

Emma Thomas, Woolworths' company secretary, said: “He thought he had bought them last Thursday and has now notified us that he has not.”

A spokesman for Sir Alan refused to comment on the trade but insisted that the tycoon, famous for his “You're Fired” catchphrase on The Apprentice, had not been left out of pocket. He said: “He's paid nothing and therefore lost nothing.”

http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/retailing/article4965453.ece

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It wasn't that long ago that RBS shares were down to 9p. The vested interests only papered over the cracks at that point and the mess is going to be so much worse next time.

I can see some banks being allowed to fail, after all how many do we really need.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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