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Trampa501

Why Don't People Loot Waterstones?

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Are book-readers less likely to commit crimes?

They checked the Internet first and all the copies of "Rioting and looting for Dummies" had already been sold.

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pointless question ....

books are low value items, typically paperbacks cost less than a tenner and hardbacks less than 30 quid.

Compare that with a flat screen TV or Xbox for resale value ....

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Are book-readers less likely to commit crimes?

Exactly the same thought occurred to me - no bookstores got done. Apart from commuters or when on beach holidays, you don't see many Britons reading books. Go abroad, and in some European cities it's quite common to see books being enjoyed on park benches and in cafes

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Are book-readers less likely to commit crimes?

True crime about modern gangsters, street fighters etc are huge sellers. Think of WHSmiths at airport they have a whole section for unsavoury sorts to read inbetween lager binges.

Books weigh too much and are unsellable stolen therefore lousy loot?

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The ability to sit and read a book is a skill we do not cherish enough in this country.

Why have we given our kids noisy youth clubs to "entertain" them in when we would have been better teaching them quiet hobbies you can do on your own for little or no money.

Enforcing the belief that they have a "right" to be given something to do, is really wrong.

There are no equivalents to youth clubs for adults. You can decide to go to the pub, or to a club, or evening class if you want... but they're free for all not aimed at one section of society.

The idea that youth clubs are "keeping kids off the street" is utter ********.

They should be at home. If they are causing trouble on the streets then send them home or punish them.

The decline in library use was always going to be a bad sign.

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Exactly the same thought occurred to me - no bookstores got done. Apart from commuters or when on beach holidays, you don't see many Britons reading books. Go abroad, and in some European cities it's quite common to see books being enjoyed on park benches and in cafes

Interesting piece in the Guardian on this (only came across this after making my post and then googling)

waterstones article

Oh how Twitter scoffed and acted unsurprised as we woke to find our local bookshops had escaped the attentions of the looting riotniks. Waterstone's even challenged rioters to loot them as "they might learn something". Ha ha! LOLZ! Sigh. It's difficult to argue with the stark economic realism of those who weighed up their looting options and came down firmly on the side of widescreen TVs and box-fresh kicks. Maeve Binchys don't fetch a huge resale price on the black market – especially if they're already in the 3 for 2.

But while the rioters' indifference to the intellectual riches on offer at Waterstone's may or may not be attributable to the much-touted death of the book, it does throw up some stark questions. Is reading just for the middle classes? Are you more or less likely to riot if you read? What could books offer the looters anyway?

It has to be said, bookstores I use do feel like most of their customers belong to the white middle-classes.

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The ability to sit and read a book is a skill we do not cherish enough in this country.

Why have we given our kids noisy youth clubs to "entertain" them in when we would have been better teaching them quiet hobbies you can do on your own for little or no money.

The decline in library use was always going to be a bad sign.

+1

I'd like to think the Brits do their reading online now, but the Europeans are laden with iPhones and tablets and laptops yet still get their books out at lunchtimes and leisure times, so the conclusion I draw is that Britain has indeed a problem in the literacy department

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pointless question ....

books are low value items, typically paperbacks cost less than a tenner and hardbacks less than 30 quid.

Compare that with a flat screen TV or Xbox for resale value ....

Also add in the fact that weight increases with value so hardbacks are heavier.

There is a limit to the number of hardback books you can carry before suffering a hernia.

Anyone moving house will know the boxes full of books are often the heaviest items.

They are also difficult to fence.

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Interesting piece in the Guardian on this (only came across this after making my post and then googling)

waterstones article

It has to be said, bookstores I use do feel like most of their customers belong to the white middle-classes.

"we woke to find our local bookshops had escaped the attentions of the looting riotniks. Waterstone's even challenged rioters to loot them as "they might learn something". Did Waterstone's really say that? Must be sure no one would, as must their insurer. It's a bitter-sweet fact that no one wants to rob a shop that sells books.

The article suggests producing books that appeal to the sections of society that currently have no interest in books (unless they are about using a screwdriver to get into a car). The achievement would be to take them from such feral interests to learning about legitimate philosophies and subjects, not merely bringing the book contents down to their lower street level. That sort of thing needs role models and more easily starts at home, I don't know how they can save the current generation of young criminals

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Exactly the same thought occurred to me - no bookstores got done. Apart from commuters or when on beach holidays, you don't see many Britons reading books. Go abroad, and in some European cities it's quite common to see books being enjoyed on park benches and in cafes

I lived in Vienna for a year and saw barely anyone reading books

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"we woke to find our local bookshops had escaped the attentions of the looting riotniks. Waterstone's even challenged rioters to loot them as "they might learn something". Did Waterstone's really say that? Must be sure no one would, as must their insurer. It's a bitter-sweet fact that no one wants to rob a shop that sells books.

The article suggests producing books that appeal to the sections of society that currently have no interest in books (unless they are about using a screwdriver to get into a car). The achievement would be to take them from such feral interests to learning about legitimate philosophies and subjects, not merely bringing the book contents down to their lower street level. That sort of thing needs role models and more easily starts at home, I don't know how they can save the current generation of young criminals

Ask Chris Rock - he knows.... *Warning - may offend the feeble minded*

3.33 in

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True crime about modern gangsters, street fighters etc are huge sellers. Think of WHSmiths at airport they have a whole section for unsavoury sorts to read inbetween lager binges.

Books weigh too much and are unsellable stolen therefore lousy loot?

Fact is, even if they wanted books it would be more efficient to nick Kindles instead and then illegally download the books.

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Krackersdave, "Books are like kryptonite" :lol:

I laughed but it's a sad state of affairs, lives are being wasted, I don't know how they're going to put it right

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I was in Waterstones on Friday. Went in to enquire about a book: "The Writers and Artists Yearbook 2012".

I went up to the counter but the guy was busy. While I waited momentarily I noticed a stack of William Goldings "Lord of the Flies" immediately to the right.

I chuckled at the the obvious irony and mentioned it to the assistant.

He says "We've had those there since Monday and you're the first person to get the joke."

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Got to admit, i laughed my ass off at that, but it's pretty much the case for anyone who'll be robbing your house

That's Rocks point I think - the N word no longer is used to denegrate all blacks but appears to be reserved and used by blacks to describe black "chavs" in the US.

Maybe Starkey should have used the N-word in a Chris Rock stylee...

The BBC would have exploded!!! :lol:

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pointless question ....

books are low value items, typically paperbacks cost less than a tenner and hardbacks less than 30 quid.

Compare that with a flat screen TV or Xbox for resale value ....

Nice theory, but the fact that at least one pound shop got looted kind of blows a hole in it... ;)

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Perhaps you live in a very white middle class area then. <_<

Waterstones have it right though, only the educated and interested read books.

I've bought a few from Waterstones, but only impulse buys as anything costing more than a fiver I google and get it from fleebay or amazon.

You're making the mistake of assuming there is a Waterstones (which I frequent) where I live. I can't vouch for the class composition where I live (in London it is hard to do this), but I would guess 97% of tenants in my block are not British white. If you include European migrants, maybe 30% white. Hardly a "very white" place. More Middle-Eastern and African, but fairly mixed.

I can't remember there being a Waterstones in previous places I've lived (which include Stockwell and south Norwood). Like any able-bodied person though I walked/caught the bus to the places where you would find a book store. I have to admit that I too use Amazon (or even the charity store) for certain purchases.

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That's Rocks point I think - the N word no longer is used to denegrate all blacks but appears to be reserved and used by blacks to describe black "chavs" in the US.

Maybe Starkey should have used the N-word in a Chris Rock stylee...

The BBC would have exploded!!! :lol:

Anagram of ginger. Not many people know that. Make of that what you will. :D

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Anagram of ginger. Not many people know that. Make of that what you will. :D

They've remade that film haven't they... calling the dog "digger" as to not cause offence.

Cos no one would use a digging tool name for a derogatory term.

We were joking about this lack of looting books.

I know how long it takes me to decide what book to buy when I go in. Even with free rein for as many as I could carry I would still be there a week later trying to decide.

:)

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That's Rocks point I think - the N word no longer is used to denegrate all blacks but appears to be reserved and used by blacks to describe black "chavs" in the US.

Maybe Starkey should have used the N-word in a Chris Rock stylee...

The BBC would have exploded!!! :lol:

I was born and brought up in Lozells, Birmingham. The massive black community there have always used the N word for the black low life. The N word now means black Chav. The white community use the C word for white low life. For some reason the word Chav is acceptable and the N$gger word is not acceptable in cross culture chit chat. There is no such thing as a black chav or a white n$gger . Starkey please note.

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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