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Riot Boy's Family Is Kicked Out Of Home

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Riot boy's family is kicked out of home: Suspected looter and his mother are the first to be punished with eviction

Daniel Sartain-Clarke and his mother served with eviction notice

Suspect's mother says he 'was in the wrong place at the wrong time'

Wandsworth Council the first to service eviction notice

Online petition crashed after asking if looters should lose their benefits

Works and Pensions Minister puts together plan to deprive convicted rioters of benefits

Host of local councils vow to follow suit and boot out looters from homes

A suspected looter in this week's riots and his mother are being thrown out of their council home.

In the first case of its kind, Daniel Sartain-Clarke, 18, and his mother have been served with an eviction notice as council bosses seek to turf them out of their £225,000 taxpayer-subsidised flat.

Sartain-Clarke is charged with violent disorder and attempting to steal electronic goods from the Currys store at Clapham Junction, South London, on Monday night.

Under housing rules his mother – as the tenant – can be evicted from their two-bedroom flat in Battersea if anyone living there is involved in criminality.

There is likely to be a flood of similar cases as council leaders across England respond to public demands that looters face the toughest penalties possible.

In another day of dramatic developments:

A serving paratrooper was remanded in custody charged with looting a £1,900 electric guitar in Manchester;

The Ministry of Justice revealed that the arrest total had reached 1,600, and that 796 of those had already been before courts;

Police were in revolt against the Government after criticism of their handling of the crisis by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary;

Fresh revelations emerged about the gangster background of Mark Duggan, whose death sparked the riots.

Sartain-Clarke was arrested after more than 100 looters went on the rampage on Monday night. For two hours the mob ransacked mobile phone stores and sports shops such as Foot Locker and JD Sports.

He appeared before magistrates in Battersea on Wednesday accused of burglary and violent disorder, and was remanded in custody with two co-defendants.

Ravi Govindia, the leader of Wandsworth Council which issued the eviction notice, said he wanted the 'strongest possible action' taken against rioters and looters.

'This council will do its utmost to ensure that those who are responsible pay a proper price,' he said. 'Ultimately this could lead to eviction from their homes.

'Our officers will continue to work with the courts to establish the identities of other council tenants or members of their households as more cases are processed in the coming days and weeks.

'Most residents on our housing estates are decent law-abiding citizens who will have been sickened at the scenes they witnessed on their TV screens this week.

'As much as anything else we owe it to them to send out a strong signal that this kind of violence will not be tolerated.'

But Sartain-Clarke's mother said her human rights had been 'taken for granted'.

She said: 'I understand there are people who have got to face justice because all this has been madness and savagery.

'But, I believe our human rights have been completely taken for granted. Daniel was just in the wrong place at the wrong time.

'As a mother I'm not responsible for my son's actions and they are penalising me for his actions.'

The Spanish-born part-time worker said the decision had left her 'very upset' and she did not know where they would go if she and daughter Revecca, 8, were evicted.

Other councils are believed to be cross-checking names of alleged looters who have appeared in court this week with housing lists, and dozens more cases could emerge in the coming weeks.

On a visit to Manchester, David Cameron repeated his determination to see looters evicted from council houses.

'If you live in a council house, you're getting a house at a discount from what other people have to pay and with that should come some responsibility,' he told BBC North West Tonight.

'For too long we've taken a too-soft attitude towards people who loot and pillage their own community. If you do that you should lose your right to the sort of housing that you've had at subsidised rates.

'Obviously, that will mean they've got to be housed somewhere else. They'll have to find housing in the private sector and that will be tougher for them, but they should have thought of that before they turned on their own community.'

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Can I go to Madrid or Barcelona and claim free housing and benefits? B)

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Do councils have similar powers to confiscate bankers property?

I think they should.

Comedy Dave needs to immediately (or by Monday at the latest) insist that anyone working at board level or reporting to board level for any of our insolvent banks has their house(s), their bank accounts, their cars, yachts, and Chelsea season tickets seized and liquidated until the bank debts are repaid.

Tough love - it's the only way these scum will take notice.

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Can I go to Madrid or Barcelona and claim free housing and benefits? B)

This seems a very rough sort of justice punishing a parent for the crimes of an adult child. The nuisance neighbour element of the council tenancy agreements allows such evictions under civil law but I would have thought as the individual who had committed the crime was already convicted under criminal law then it would seem the aim is to punish the families of poorer rioters more than the richer ones.

Will the multi millionaire parents of the girl from Kent who was found with £5000 of looted gear in her car face similar retribution under civil law? Somehow I suspect not.

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So we have someone who is probably receiving housing benefit for a council flat who will now be receiving extra housing benefit for a flat in the private sector (probably). Can understand the council need and desire to do this though - after all they are supposed to be the people looking after the local amenities. No-one wants to be seen giving a leg up to people who just want to trash them.

I am beginning to wonder if the whole riot isn't some form of quantitative easing. People get free stuff. The shopkeepers get bailed out by insurance/police. Govt prints money and gives it to failing insurance firms and police.

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This seems a very rough sort of justice punishing a parent for the crimes of an adult child. The nuisance neighbour element of the council tenancy agreements allows such evictions under civil law but I would have thought as the individual who had committed the crime was already convicted under criminal law then it would seem the aim is to punish the families of poorer rioters than the richer ones.

Will the multi millionaire parents of the girl from Kent who was found with £5000 of looted gear in her car face similar retribution under civil law? Somehow I suspect not.

+1

And there's an 8 yr old girl about to be made homeless through no fault of her own. Not that this will matter to 'outraged of tunbridge wells' who of course this populist, knee-jerk bullsh1t is intended to keep happy.

And yes, I think you can claim benefits in Madrid.

And for balance:

"As a mother I'm not responsible for my son's actions"

Which I think answers a lot of questions about how this could happen.

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So what is going to happen in reality; They will wait until evicted, rock up to the council, say they have been made unintentionally homeless, council will have to rehouse them. What is the point of that?

Is this also going to apply to any criminal activity not related to the riots?

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[Riot boy's family is kicked out of home: Suspected looter and his mother are the first to be punished with eviction

An ill thought out knee jerk reaction.

A good deal of the social problems we experience is a result of local authorities decisions that created sink estates in the first place. Brave new world.

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So what is going to happen in reality; They will wait until evicted, rock up to the council, say they have been made unintentionally homeless, council will have to rehouse them. What is the point of that?

Is this also going to apply to any criminal activity not related to the riots?

The guy from wandsworth council said on the radio yesterday that it's considered as being made intentionally homeless and so the council has no obligation to rehouse them. he said, it's down to her now.

I think this is brilliant, it should make the scum think twice before doing anything stupid. The prospect of you and your family being kicked out onto the streets is much worse than a six month suspended sentence and a slap on the wrist.

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So we have someone who is probably receiving housing benefit for a council flat who will now be receiving extra housing benefit for a flat in the private sector (probably). Can understand the council need and desire to do this though - after all they are supposed to be to people looking after the local amenities. No-one wants to be seen giving a leg up to people who just want to trash them.

I am beginning to wonder if the whole riot isn't some form of quantative easing. People get free stuff. The shopkeepers get bailed out by insurance/police. Govt prints money and gives it to failing insurance firms and police.

...and I thought we were meant to be cutting costs. ;)

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This seems a very rough sort of justice punishing a parent for the crimes of an adult child.

It would have been fairer if there was not a law prohibiting her from punishing the miscreant in a way he might just understand, but I don't see a fundamental problem with having a condition along the lines of "you will not go around looting if we let you live here". Bear in mind that those paying both their own rent and a big chunk of other people's housing costs routinely get told "no pets, no children", and can typically have their tenancy terminated for any reason whatsoever given just a few months notice.

The nuisance neighbour element of the council tenancy agreements allows such evictions under civil law but I would have thought as the individual who had committed the crime was already convicted under criminal law then it would seem the aim is to punish the families of poorer rioters than the richer ones.

It's been a long time since someone living in a council house was certain to be poorer than those who didn't.

Will the multi millionaire parents of the girl from Kent who was found with £5000 of looted gear in her car face similar retribution under civil law? Somehow I suspect not.

I don't really see how relevant this is. What would the world come to if everyone paid plenty of tax and lived without recourse to benefits, etc? You can be sure their neighbors would avail themselves of all means they could under civil law if the wayward daughter went around doing anything much anti-social.

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An ill thought out knee jerk reaction.

A good deal of the social problems we experience is a result of local authorities decisions that created sink estates in the first place. Brave new world.

I think they are just `jerks' this Coalition government. I wonder what Clegg as a Liberal(sic) is thinking the he presides over the worst riots since the peasants revolt. Will we soon be seeing the parting of the way.

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Soon will be, mate

Have you ever been near an inner city or East /South/West London social housing estate mate?

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We all want to live in communities where our neighbours are friendly polite have manners and are law abiding, be it privately owned or council housing....when we drive a car we get points on our license if we do not play by the rules of the road...so if we do not play by the rules of the street we live on and share with others once we obtain a certain amount of points from crime or nuisance to our community and we are living in state subsidised housing we are out...end of..no ifs or buts. ;)

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Have you ever been near an inner city or East /South/West London social housing estate mate?

What has my personal circumstances got to do with it?

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Where in anyone's rental agreement does it state that your tenancy is under threat for knocking a policeman's helmet off?

The State are secretly desperate to do anything to take the emphasis off themselves.

Centuries of crime performed by the State, makes the rioters look positively angelic.

I'm sure Jeremy Kyle would be made Justice Minister if it was put to the online referendum

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+1

And there's an 8 yr old girl about to be made homeless through no fault of her own. Not that this will matter to 'outraged of tunbridge wells' who of course this populist, knee-jerk bullsh1t is intended to keep happy.

What the same populist, knee-jerk bullsh1t about bankers that is trotted out in a relentless fashion on here and mainstream media.....you can't pick and choose your populist, knee-jerk bullsh1t.

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And there's an 8 yr old girl about to be made homeless through no fault of her own.

Nonsense. She will just have to live in the sort of accommodation available to those who have not won the council housing lottery.

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Nonsense. She will just have to live in the sort of accommodation available to those who have not won the council housing lottery.

Agreed. I can loose my home, by being served a S21. The rental agreement states I can't smoke. neither can my guests smoke, and I'm not allowed to keep pets. let alone loot the nearby Richer Sounds for a new flat screen.

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It's about time they start doing the parents for the crimes of the child. If they can stop waiving council houses in front of them for having kids, that would be a step further.

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He asked if you'd been near one, not whether you lived in one and you haven't answered the question.

What would that have anything to do with it too?

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We all want to live in communities where our neighbours are friendly polite have manners and are law abiding, be it privately owned or council housing....when we drive a car we get points on our license if we do not play by the rules of the road...so if we do not play by the rules of the street we live on and share with others once we obtain a certain amount of points from crime or nuisance to our community and we are living in state subsidised housing we are out...end of..no ifs or buts. ;)

But are they subisdised. Some have lived in them for years paying rent to pay back some dreadful loans taken out by council landlords since the thirties. Which was one of the reasons the Thatcher Government wanted to sell them of. How many times do you hear on here something is only worth what some other prat is prepared to pay for it. I wouldn't want one and that takes into account I have no selfish resentment for those that do. (I not referring to you sir)

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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