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Cameron - Low Interest Rates Because The Markets Have Confidence In The Uk

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Just answered a question over the riots, around 14:04 today and said we've got low interest rates because the markets have confidence in the UK and austerity measures.

Seems like this is a statement Cameron will regret making.

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Just answered a question over the riots, around 14:04 today and said we've got low interest rates because the markets have confidence in the UK and austerity measures.

Seems like this is a statement Cameron will regret making.

Ah, thank you David Cameron.

I needed something to cheer me up so badly today - and this must be one of the funniest statements in recent months.

Ooh, I did chuckle

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Simplisitic, jingoistic nonsense. The markets know precisely why base rates have been set to rock bottom; the economy was going into cardiac arrest. Slashing base rates was the economic equivalent of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

They can't afford to tackle inflation by raising rates for fear of causing economic catastrophe; holding rates low is also a convenient way to inflate the debts away.

Edited by nmarks

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Just answered a question over the riots, around 14:04 today and said we've got low interest rates because the markets have confidence in the UK and austerity measures.

Seems like this is a statement Cameron will regret making.

Our currency paints a different picture.

So now we have Dave 'rates lower for longer' Cameron, George 'rates lower for longer' Osborne and Mervyn 'rates lower for longer' King.

The three wise men have returned...

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Just answered a question over the riots, around 14:04 today and said we've got low interest rates because the markets have confidence in the UK and austerity measures.

Seems like this is a statement Cameron will regret making.

I agree that we have to start living within our means....but the cuts that are proposed are only the tip of the iceberg of what is required to sort it......look, if you keep talking the talk and acting the act...hopefully fingers crossed it will look to the rest of the world as if at least we are trying to tackle a problem that is realistically a problem that can not be resolved as it should be.....there are eyes looking at other places...keep heads down and hopefully out of trouble for the moment. ;)

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Simplisitic, jingoistic nonsense. The markets know precisely why base rates have been set to rock bottom; the economy was going into cardiac arrest. Slashing base rates was the economic equivalent of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

indeed, Mrs loo has been losing interest for months....lucky if I get a cup of tea in the day.

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Stunning speech by Osborne right now.

"unrealistic house prices", "unsustainable household debt", etc.

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Was just about to post that myself. He could live on here.

You might not like his background. You might not like his lips or his hair. But...

listen from 12.22

Wonder if he has any BTLs. :P

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Stunning speech by Osborne right now.

"unrealistic house prices", "unsustainable household debt", etc.

Yet the OBR are planning for another £300bn household debt in this parliament and Grantley Shapps is forcing through mortgage "innovation".

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Stunning speech by Osborne right now.

"unrealistic house prices", "unsustainable household debt", etc.

Isn't it a bit unfortunate, then, that his growth projections need household debt to return to 180% of disposable income from the current, not particuarly prudent, 160%?

Peter.

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Did I just hear Osborne right, he's just admitting we've got a housing bubble!!!

Although he's not said a price correction is needed.

Overhang of debt!

You did. In fact he said it's far bigger than most countries!

And they know it has to be changed!!!!

(Sorry for exclaimations but it is a big statement)

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You did. In fact he said it's far bigger than most countries!

And they know it has to be changed!!!!

(Sorry for exclaimations but it is a big statement)

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You did. In fact he said it's far bigger than most countries!

And they know it has to be changed!!!!

(Sorry for exclaimations but it is a big statement)

So.. a return to mortgages based on 3x single income - strictly documented - with caps on BTL, no IO except as a short term stop-gap for unemployment.. a mortgage partial jubilee combined with a hike in IRs to 5%.. announcement of a major program of council house building to increase stock and cut rents/prices..

Or empty rhetoric.

Place your bets..

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Isn't it a bit unfortunate, then, that his growth projections need household debt to return to 180% of disposable income from the current, not particuarly prudent, 160%?

Peter.

yep, he lost his way at the end when he just repeated what the last PM said...well placed, hard working, prudent...all he needs is the jaw tick and a phone to throw and we are back.

Balls....total dickwad.

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Stunning speech by Osborne right now.

"unrealistic house prices", "unsustainable household debt", etc.

Have you got a link?

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Simplisitic, jingoistic nonsense. The markets know precisely why base rates have been set to rock bottom; the economy was going into cardiac arrest. Slashing base rates was the economic equivalent of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

They can't afford to tackle inflation by raising rates for fear of causing economic catastrophe; holding rates low is also a convenient way to inflate the debts away.

Cameron meant the rate at which the govt can sell its debt, only paying things like 2.2% etc. In fact, it will not last as we find the second leg down gradually pulls us into another recession before the real recovery. This is a phoney recovery faltering fast. Then the markets will look and see that the cuts cannot do anything to allow the govt to pay its way and up will go the price of the unpayable debt (currently at just over £1 TRILLION)..sound familiar? Greecy pole?

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Isn't it a bit unfortunate, then, that his growth projections need household debt to return to 180% of disposable income from the current, not particuarly prudent, 160%?

Peter.

This is what I've been thinking about....less consumer spending means less government revenue....means less government spending...

...competitive austerity with France, Spain, Italy...so no "export led recovery then"...

the only question I have in my mind about this is whether they will wait until April 2012 to announce more spending cuts :blink:

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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