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@contradevian

Average Kwh Usage

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Another £300 odd bill from Npower. Just wondering where its all going! I'm averaging 23kwh per day which seems a lot. Equivalent of a one bar electric fire on all the time. The usage is averaged out over a year, so will include heating.

I reckon 2-3kwh for computers/pc/tv/pvr etc, (tops) hot water cooking another 2-3 kwh per day, lighting should be minimal as all low wattage lamps. The big culprits in my flat will be (1) electric boiler and (2) washer/dryer, but during the summer months should be possible to average less than 10kwh per day?

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I use about 650kWh or electricity per quarter, or about 7kWh per day, but I have gas heating. I have a couple of desktop computers that run all the time, and I reckon each one uses about 1kWh per day when the monitor is switched off. I don't have an electric tumble drier either.

With electricity bill as large as yours, it might be worth spending £20 to £30 on a whole-house electricity monitor. Some energy companies even give them away. I've got one, and I've been able to reduce my electricity consumption by about 25%, by identifying the most power-hungry appliances and switching them off, or even replacing them with more efficient models in a couple of cases.

If all your heating is electric, then you might want to look at the subsidised insulation materials that some of the DIY shops are selling.

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Get a monitor.

We use about 350w an hour without actively using anything.

We do have a server under the stairs though and a garage remote door which uses a lot on standby (And I can't persuade him indoors to turn it off or put it on a remote socket )

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Another £300 odd bill from Npower. Just wondering where its all going! I'm averaging 23kwh per day which seems a lot. Equivalent of a one bar electric fire on all the time. The usage is averaged out over a year, so will include heating.

I reckon 2-3kwh for computers/pc/tv/pvr etc, (tops) hot water cooking another 2-3 kwh per day, lighting should be minimal as all low wattage lamps. The big culprits in my flat will be (1) electric boiler and (2) washer/dryer, but during the summer months should be possible to average less than 10kwh per day?

My house back in the UK with a gas boiler, woodstove and solar water heating kept electric use low. I reckoned to use about 3000kwh a year so approx 9 per day. It was a 4 bed house with me and 1-2 lodgers at any one time.

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Get a monitor.

We use about 350w an hour without actively using anything.

We do have a server under the stairs though and a garage remote door which uses a lot on standby (And I can't persuade him indoors to turn it off or put it on a remote socket )

We average 270 per hour all in. We dont sit in the dark or wear un iromed shirts, we watch tele and have a computer. Are you sure you dont have a problem like a neighbour tapped into your supply. I had that once in a rented bedsit and it is not unknown in houses..

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Another £300 odd bill from Npower. Just wondering where its all going! I'm averaging 23kwh per day which seems a lot. Equivalent of a one bar electric fire on all the time. The usage is averaged out over a year, so will include heating.

I reckon 2-3kwh for computers/pc/tv/pvr etc, (tops) hot water cooking another 2-3 kwh per day, lighting should be minimal as all low wattage lamps. The big culprits in my flat will be (1) electric boiler and (2) washer/dryer, but during the summer months should be possible to average less than 10kwh per day?

My house back in the UK with a gas boiler, woodstove and solar water heating kept electric use low. I reckoned to use about 3000kwh a year so approx 9 per day. It was a 4 bed house with me and 1-2 lodgers at any one time.

If your heating and hot water also electric 23kwh a day average seems reasonable.

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We average 270 per hour all in. We dont sit in the dark or wear un iromed shirts, we watch tele and have a computer. Are you sure you dont have a problem like a neighbour tapped into your supply. I had that once in a rented bedsit and it is not unknown in houses..

We checked for that! Turned everything off in the house and still it was showing as using power...

The garage remote door opener is 75w! He won't have it turned off cos it'd be a PITA to switch back on to get the car out.

We have f & freezerand and the server computer on.

freezer could probably do with a defrost.

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We average 270 per hour all in. We dont sit in the dark or wear un iromed shirts, we watch tele and have a computer. Are you sure you dont have a problem like a neighbour tapped into your supply. I had that once in a rented bedsit and it is not unknown in houses..

Its a newish build apartment. The concierge let me into the utilities room this morning to take my meter reading. Npower have over estimated by nearly £100.

I am going to check it over a week. Can't see it being more than 6-7 kwh a day at the moment with no heating on.Can't really do much about insulating, because as I say its a new build and should already be pretty well insulated. This morning spent a few minutes re-organising plugs to powerpoints, for the mass switching off of gadgets!

The neighbours warned me about the underfloor heating, and they tend to heat relying on the heated bathroom towel rails and a fan heater!!

But I found once the underfloor was property maintained it really only needed to be on an hour or two, to warm the place through.

I no longer have the hot water on timer, I just put it on for 1 hour as required, can go up to 3 days before the shower water is too cool.

I too have an "internet/media" server, which is plugged into a Maplin power meter. Its over 1kwh a day, with the Home hub. speakers and various other crap plugged in.

Watching my LCD flat screen in 50% power saving mode atm! :lol:

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We checked for that! Turned everything off in the house and still it was showing as using power...

The garage remote door opener is 75w! He won't have it turned off cos it'd be a PITA to switch back on to get the car out.

We have f & freezerand and the server computer on.

freezer could probably do with a defrost.

Blimey. That garage door is costing you £84pa at my marginal rate.

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Blimey. That garage door is costing you £84pa at my marginal rate.

This has all been discussed ..

I think it's an appalling waste. Apparently compromise is reached by me being too short to go and turn it off.

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This has all been discussed ..

I think it's an appalling waste. Apparently compromise is reached by me being too short to go and turn it off.

Hmm, far be it from me to suggest skullduggery between husband and wife but there must be a way . Perhaps some ''random inexplicable'' RF interferance could be arranged to make the thing more trouble than it is worth.

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Another £300 odd bill from Npower. Just wondering where its all going! I'm averaging 23kwh per day which seems a lot. Equivalent of a one bar electric fire on all the time. The usage is averaged out over a year, so will include heating.

I reckon 2-3kwh for computers/pc/tv/pvr etc, (tops) hot water cooking another 2-3 kwh per day, lighting should be minimal as all low wattage lamps. The big culprits in my flat will be (1) electric boiler and (2) washer/dryer, but during the summer months should be possible to average less than 10kwh per day?

£15 per month (direct debit).

Covers 'puter (100+ hours/week use), kitchen stuff including all-electric cooking and many kettles per day (work from home), electric shower, and standard things like lighting and appliances.

Tip: whenever you buy an electrical appliance, pay attention to power consumption figures. Low power consumption is an important consideration in all my purchases.

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£15 per month (direct debit).

Covers 'puter (100+ hours/week use), kitchen stuff including all-electric cooking and many kettles per day (work from home), electric shower, and standard things like lighting and appliances.

Tip: whenever you buy an electrical appliance, pay attention to power consumption figures. Low power consumption is an important consideration in all my purchases.

That is impressive. My current bill is £20pcm for two of us in a three bedroom house. We cook, boil kettles and heat water with gas. I feel my parsimony gland stimulating me to look more closely at our appliances.

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About 12 kWh/day, for a three bed with no gas. At least 1/4 of that is parasitic loads, like the TV antenna amplifier, the hob, the oven, the CH controller, clocks, the ADSL router, and on, and on.

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Hmm, far be it from me to suggest skullduggery between husband and wife but there must be a way . Perhaps some ''random inexplicable'' RF interferance could be arranged to make the thing more trouble than it is worth.

He's recently replaced the battery in the remote ...

He's a bit of an electronics gek though so will spot anything

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Think the major culprit is the 9kw electric boiler. If its on for an hour thats just over a £1! :unsure:

I don't have it on a timer, just press the +1 hour button when the water gets a bit lukewarm. It can be up to 3 days before I need to reheat the water tank. The temperature on the water tank was a little too high so just timing the boiler now to see how quickly it brings the temperature up.

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Think the major culprit is the 9kw electric boiler. If its on for an hour thats just over a £1! :unsure:

I don't have it on a timer, just press the +1 hour button when the water gets a bit lukewarm. It can be up to 3 days before I need to reheat the water tank. The temperature on the water tank was a little too high so just timing the boiler now to see how quickly it brings the temperature up.

The only defensible reason for a hot water tank is if you have a part-time heat source such as solar panels.

The ones in most British homes are just a symptom of how backward our tradesmen are: builders and plumbers treating them as normal as recently as the 1980s! In a saner country, my grandparents house had more modern plumbing than that, and I though don't know when it was last updated, my mother was born in the 1930s and tells me it was older then her!

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He's recently replaced the battery in the remote ...

He's a bit of an electronics gek though so will spot anything

Ah well, it seems you will just have to think of the £84 as part of the price of love, I've taken bigger hits and smiled.

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Ah well, it seems you will just have to think of the £84 as part of the price of love, I've taken bigger hits and smiled.

Indeed

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The only defensible reason for a hot water tank is if you have a part-time heat source such as solar panels.

The ones in most British homes are just a symptom of how backward our tradesmen are: builders and plumbers treating them as normal as recently as the 1980s! In a saner country, my grandparents house had more modern plumbing than that, and I though don't know when it was last updated, my mother was born in the 1930s and tells me it was older then her!

I've dropped the thermostat down to 55F (was at 60). Reckon the most economic I can do it (without going without showers obviously), is to run the boiler every 2 or 3 days for at least half an hour. Still not convinced that would bring the tank up to required temperature up. Oh well. Seems pointless cutting back on PC's when the elephant in the room is the big stupid 9kw electric boiler. Instantaneous water sources such as showers would have been far better than a tank of hot water that goes cold if not used. Crap stupid, modern plumbing!

Actually every two days for an hour would still average 4.5 kwh so should be able to live under 10kwh per day easily during summer. Winter interesting, as a £1 an hour to heat the apartment, with boiler at full bore. Maybe stand alone oiled filled radiators might be more efficient, than under floor hot water, heated by electric.

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We used to average about 12Kw a day (3 bed detached), since the baby arrived though and Mrs Spot stays at home it can be anywhere from 18 - 23Kw.

She's a bugger for doing half empty washing machine or dishwasher loads.

I've got a leccy monitor so I can see what really consumes - Washing machine, dishwasher, oven, microwave, kettle, non LED lights, fans, aircon & anything with a fan in it. Oh yeah and the rare occasion the freezer kicks in it can take a fair bit of juice.

Stuff like TV, hi-fi, wireless routers, etc aren't too bad.

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I average 6.1kwh per day. Gas for hob and heating.

I also have a hot water tank in a newly built house, and I only have hot water on for 10mins every morning and it gives me enough hot water for more than two showers plus hand washing etc. It will also keeps hot water hot enough for a shower after three days.

The other reason for the hot water tank is because it is an un-vented pressure tank, i.e. it uses the main water presure to give power shower performance in all taps/showers, and does not need an electric pump when the shower is running (unlike those with a combi-boiler who want decent shower pressure).

I pay per month £22 for elec, and £24 for gas. I also got £130 back last year (but the DD was a bit higher).

Oh, and for the garage opener why not get a timer switch - I'm sure you don't need the facility to open your garage in the middle of the night.

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I've dropped the thermostat down to 55F (was at 60). Reckon the most economic I can do it (without going without showers obviously), is to run the boiler every 2 or 3 days for at least half an hour. Still not convinced that would bring the tank up to required temperature up. Oh well. Seems pointless cutting back on PC's when the elephant in the room is the big stupid 9kw electric boiler. Instantaneous water sources such as showers would have been far better than a tank of hot water that goes cold if not used. Crap stupid, modern plumbing!

Actually every two days for an hour would still average 4.5 kwh so should be able to live under 10kwh per day easily during summer. Winter interesting, as a £1 an hour to heat the apartment, with boiler at full bore. Maybe stand alone oiled filled radiators might be more efficient, than under floor hot water, heated by electric.

Stick an extra jacket on it - that will cut heat losses by a fair amount. Insulate all the pipe work too. Don't be tempted to drop temperature below 55 degrees C as Legionella starts to become a risk

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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