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Superted187

Train Journeys Hugely More Expensive In The South East

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I've been looking into comuting costs as I'm looking at possibly relocating to the Midlands, or staying in Reading taking a new job in London.

I've done a quick comparison on the two commuter routes that I'm looking at - mainly looking at cost. I was shocked to discover that the commuter route in the South East was more than 3x more expensive than the Midlands commuter route:

Reading to Paddington. Distance Approx 40 miles. Duration 40 mins

Operator: First Great Western

Peak time Day Return £37.50

Monthly pass: £355.80

Worcester to Birmingham. Distance Approx 35 miles. Duration 46 mins.

Operator: London Midland

Peak time Day Return: £9.20

Monthly pass: £108.30

1. How is it, that so many people just pay the £350 monthly travel cost to get to work? It blows the cost of commuting by car out of the water!

2. Can the Reading to London route really be justified as being more than 3x the cost of the Worcester to Birmingham route? Does the route really cost the rail operator that much more to run?

3. How can the powers that be be serious about getting us plebs out of ours cars?

No wonder the rental market in London is so strong. If it's this expensive to commute in from a town like Reading, and you're renting in a commuter town, you may as well put the £350 towards renting a place in London.

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Mr. 187,

I used to commute from London to Reading, and the cost was shocking.

But upon trying to commute on my motorcycle instead, I rapidly came to envy the dead. I can only imagine what it was like in a car, being unable to filter between lanes.

As expensive as it was, it was relatively quick, I always got a seat, and I could have a pint with my co-worker on the way back into London. Obviously, this was some time ago.

Not that that excuses the price differential. It's just that you have no hope of changing it and you might as well look on the bright side.

Regards,

Mr. Smith

I've been looking into comuting costs as I'm looking at possibly relocating to the Midlands, or staying in Reading taking a new job in London.

I've done a quick comparison on the two commuter routes that I'm looking at - mainly looking at cost. I was shocked to discover that the commuter route in the South East was more than 3x more expensive than the Midlands commuter route:

Reading to Paddington. Distance Approx 40 miles. Duration 40 mins

Operator: First Great Western

Peak time Day Return £37.50

Monthly pass: £355.80

Worcester to Birmingham. Distance Approx 35 miles. Duration 46 mins.

Operator: London Midland

Peak time Day Return: £9.20

Monthly pass: £108.30

1. How is it, that so many people just pay the £350 monthly travel cost to get to work? It blows the cost of commuting by car out of the water!

2. Can the Reading to London route really be justified as being more than 3x the cost of the Worcester to Birmingham route? Does the route really cost the rail operator that much more to run?

3. How can the powers that be be serious about getting us plebs out of ours cars?

No wonder the rental market in London is so strong. If it's this expensive to commute in from a town like Reading, and you're renting in a commuter town, you may as well put the £350 towards renting a place in London.

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Mr. Russe11,

Mr. 187 doesn't state if he is a contractor or a permanent employee, but few companies offer to accept their employee's commuting costs as expenses, though some will contribute to them.

Not many, though.

When working as a contractor, you can often write off your travel expenses, but that doesn't make it free. It's just subtracted from your taxable income.

Regards,

Mr. Smith

what does it matter if its expensed?

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Not everyone is a contractor who can / limited company who can expense everything. As an employee you have to earn the money, pay tax, NI, Student loan then pay the rail fare (which is possibly has tax) .

what a ******in joke, no wonder people can't be bothered to work anymore.

BTW, it'a about £55/day from Dover to London high speed return.

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But maybe it linked to house prices, if you can't afford to live there, maybe it works out cheaper to commute.

For those that are contractors or get fully expensed then maybe it works out better than having a asset or having to pay tax on a vechile to commute.

If your a contractor in the city and your on 450-650 a day then a £50 commute seems reasonable, theres plenty willing to pay the money for convinence!

Plenty of car parks are 20-30 a day so if you factor in the cost of running a vehicle/parking and the train then it could appear fair?

Either it makes sense to use the train for commuting or it does not, the railways are private companies, they charge what they can, the busier the routes the more they can charge.

I stopped using the trains when the price got near to £10 for a 17 min journey, when the price was sub £6 a couple three years ago then i'd use maybe once in the week to visit friends, at the weekend to go into the city and maybe us it if had a work meeting or simular. Now i'll use it maybe once every few months, during the day often the trains are dead that pass through my town, if they dropped the price by half then i'd use it three times a week again.

Whats a single fair peak times on the underground now?

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Yes - I know several contractors that do more expensive commutes by train (Banbury to London) but they are contractors and are on about £450 a day - basically the same as what somebody previously mentioned,

How likely is it that an employer is going to take a full time member of staff's commuting costs of £350 on the chin each month?

Perhaps I should go contracting....

I could drive into London and Park in the suburbs for free - I'm originally from West London. But my god I would never want to sit in those jams. I'd have to leave home before 7 just to make sure I didn't end up sitting in traffic.

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I've been looking into comuting costs as I'm looking at possibly relocating to the Midlands, or staying in Reading taking a new job in London.

I've done a quick comparison on the two commuter routes that I'm looking at - mainly looking at cost. I was shocked to discover that the commuter route in the South East was more than 3x more expensive than the Midlands commuter route:

Reading to Paddington. Distance Approx 40 miles. Duration 40 mins

Operator: First Great Western

Peak time Day Return £37.50

Monthly pass: £355.80

Worcester to Birmingham. Distance Approx 35 miles. Duration 46 mins.

Operator: London Midland

Peak time Day Return: £9.20

Monthly pass: £108.30

1. How is it, that so many people just pay the £350 monthly travel cost to get to work? It blows the cost of commuting by car out of the water!

2. Can the Reading to London route really be justified as being more than 3x the cost of the Worcester to Birmingham route? Does the route really cost the rail operator that much more to run?

3. How can the powers that be be serious about getting us plebs out of ours cars?

No wonder the rental market in London is so strong. If it's this expensive to commute in from a town like Reading, and you're renting in a commuter town, you may as well put the £350 towards renting a place in London.

The one I did (and paid for out my own pocket) was:

Swindon to Paddington. Distance Approx 90 miles. Duration 65 mins

Operator: First Great Western

Monthly pass: ~£750 (includes tube)

I must have been mental.

Edited by cheeznbreed

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I've been looking into comuting costs as I'm looking at possibly relocating to the Midlands, or staying in Reading taking a new job in London.

I've done a quick comparison on the two commuter routes that I'm looking at - mainly looking at cost. I was shocked to discover that the commuter route in the South East was more than 3x more expensive than the Midlands commuter route:

Reading to Paddington. Distance Approx 40 miles. Duration 40 mins

Operator: First Great Western

Peak time Day Return £37.50

Monthly pass: £355.80

Worcester to Birmingham. Distance Approx 35 miles. Duration 46 mins.

Operator: London Midland

Peak time Day Return: £9.20

Monthly pass: £108.30

1. How is it, that so many people just pay the £350 monthly travel cost to get to work? It blows the cost of commuting by car out of the water!

2. Can the Reading to London route really be justified as being more than 3x the cost of the Worcester to Birmingham route? Does the route really cost the rail operator that much more to run?

No, neither line runs at a proft and the government subsidise the London-Reading route by less than the Birminham-Worcester route for no other reason than: because they can.

tim

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No, neither line runs at a proft and the government subsidise the London-Reading route by less than the Birminham-Worcester route for no other reason than: because they can.

tim

there is also simple supply and demand, the reading line charges more because it can

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The normal rules of supply/demand are extra complicated for rail tickets.

I have noticed that places like Reading and Swindon suffer because in peak times the train going into London is often fully booked to capacity, so the operator knows that for every Reading/Swindon > London ticket they sell, they are losing a customer who would have bought a ticket from Bristol > London

To counteract that they increase the ticket price so that they make the same profit level as selling a ticket from Bristol.

If you are travelling from somewhere like margate (right at the end of the line) then you dont get that effect and the price per mile is much lower.

There have been cases where its actually cheaper to buy a ticket going past your desired destination and then 'accidentally' get off a stop or two early, if they catch you doing this they can (in theory) charge you a penalty fare, as you didnt complete the correct route.

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Reading to Paddington. Distance Approx 40 miles. Duration 40 mins

Operator: First Great Western

Peak time Day Return £37.50

Monthly pass: £355.80

That seems mighty expensive if that's the case. And yet I bet the train is still packed. Over 4K a year. Reinforces my belief that you need to be earning *at least* 50-60K if you are commuting into London from somewhere like this to make it worthwhile.

Add on the 8% increase next year and thats £383 per month.

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That seems mighty expensive if that's the case. And yet I bet the train is still packed. Over 4K a year. Reinforces my belief that you need to be earning *at least* 50-60K if you are commuting into London from somewhere like this to make it worthwhile.

Add on the 8% increase next year and thats £383 per month.

Make that earning at least 50K to break even on the commute + living cost.

You'll need 500/month post tax for the train (tax @ 40%) - ~6K of income - poof!

Why are the trains so expensive?

Why does a dog lick its balls - because it can.

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