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Bcs - The Chartered Institute For It

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So... BCS (British Computer Society) - The Chartered Institute for IT

About BCS - The Chartered Institute for IT

On Wikipedia

Knowing there are a lot of IT professionals on this site I was wondering whether any of you are members of the BCS / The Chartered Institute for IT.

Is it worth the £100+ a year membership? Has it made a difference to your career or made your CV / business card appear more impressive?

I'm in two minds. I'm an IT professional (well, not "I.T." - I'm a developer) and know my skills speak for themselves (in addition to qualifications) - so is it really worth joining up for the sake of it just to say I'm a member and to (possibly) receive a bi-monthly newsletter?

Are you a member? Have you considered it? Is it worth it? What are your thoughts?

Thanks.

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I find it strange that you are not permitted to design a bridge or building without being a chartered civil engineer, same with electronic appliances, can't do planning without chartered plannign status etc

and yet chartered status is not sought by corporate employers to manage/deliver their IT projects, and yet IT is synonymous with large pockets of incompetence; I suspect that this is significantly due to the lack of promotion of chartered status and professional standards supported by this status

I'm not chartered status as I have never seen it being required, but it should be IMHO

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I think being a Chartered member of the IET or IMechE will be much more useful abroad and in the UK than the BCS. The BCS always seems a bit wishy-washy in the way a lot of IT is.

I'm a member of the IET and the subscription gives you a monthly magazine which is pretty good. Sort of like New Scientist, but more engineering focused. They have recently done issues themed on what is happening in Japan since the Tsunami, cars of the future (i.e. what are the implications of charging millions of electric cars), what is Germany going to do instead of nuclear power, etc.

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I'm planning on applying for CITP status once I've finished an Oracle Java certification I am working on just now. No idea what difference it will make, but I don't see it doing any harm to my career.

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Am not a member of BCS, haven't ever found it career limiting.

IMO it's too generic to be useful - it'd be like having a british engineer society, without subtypes.

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Did it for a year. Don't think I ever did anything off the back of it, but probably usefull if freelance or looking. A lot of networking opportunities.

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I looked into it dont see any benefit other than could have some letters after my name and I dont do that sort of thing. I worked with someone who was a member but didnt consider them to be too knowledgable and dont consider it a benefit, but then I used to run the UK user group for a language I program in and was the UK trainer for that language as well.

I let my work do my talking. :)

this is an attitude typical in IT in the UK

that IT is programming, programming is IT

this explains the dire financial and organisational state so many projects get into when data-analysis and project management problems are addressed by simply employing more and more programmers

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As one person said. It's too generic a thing. Re membership of the BCS - I've never considered it a requirement in any positions I advertised in the past, and was never asked for it myself either.

If you want get something that is recognised in the industry then consider 'certifications' such as PRINCE2 or PMP for project management

ITIL for service and operations management - this is actually BCS run

CISSP, CISM for Info security

CFE for Fraud examiner

CISA for IT audit / risk management

These can be used to demonstrate expertise and experience. Though some of them have pretty tough exams and require demonstrating experience too. 4 hour exam I think for CISA, 6 hours for CISSP (that was a hard slog).

Another I would say could be better, is as one person mentioned, IET. You can get chartered status and it holds more weight in the employment world IMPO. Then again, I've never seen a job advertised saying its a good thing.

Finally, getting a professionally recognised cert is a great thing. It tells employers that you value education and lets face it, in IT you have to constantly learn just to stand still in the field.

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this is an attitude typical in IT in the UK

that IT is programming, programming is IT

this explains the dire financial and organisational state so many projects get into when data-analysis and project management problems are addressed by simply employing more and more programmers

We built a 220m GBP world-beating company with a handful of good programmers, delivering large business-critical projects to FTSE-100 companies solving problems as we went. And we've seen massive consultancies with certificates coming out of their orifices completely fail when they try and do the same. Don't knock programmers.

For example, I've done ITIL and it's very useful - for persuading the people with money that you know what you're doing and can invest their money in changing processes. It only ever boils down to common sense in any case, or "best practise ITIL for your business" if you're talking to the wallets.

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Thanks for the feedback. Yep, not really worth it - just as I thought.

Redcellar, thanks for the extra detail; really appreciated. "...you have to constantly learn just to stand still in the field" - you're not wrong... unfortunately this also implies that certifications can also become as quickly redundant as the skills and technologies they represent.

I have an MSc in CS so not worried about proving I value education or willingness to learn new things. As Tr1ck5t3r says, I think one has to just let their work do the talking and trust that demonstrable knowledge and ability is enough.

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Thanks for the feedback. Yep, not really worth it - just as I thought.

Redcellar, thanks for the extra detail; really appreciated. "...you have to constantly learn just to stand still in the field" - you're not wrong... unfortunately this also implies that certifications can also become as quickly redundant as the skills and technologies they represent.

I have an MSc in CS so not worried about proving I value education or willingness to learn new things. As Tr1ck5t3r says, I think one has to just let their work do the talking and trust that demonstrable knowledge and ability is enough.

No.... but going for an alternative certification could be useful, technical Microsoft Certification or otherwise . I recommend the CMI (Chartered Management Institute), they do a great course and its an extra bow to your arrow.

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We built a 220m GBP world-beating company with a handful of good programmers, delivering large business-critical projects to FTSE-100 companies solving problems as we went. And we've seen massive consultancies with certificates coming out of their orifices completely fail when they try and do the same. Don't knock programmers.

For example, I've done ITIL and it's very useful - for persuading the people with money that you know what you're doing and can invest their money in changing processes. It only ever boils down to common sense in any case, or "best practise ITIL for your business" if you're talking to the wallets.

I agree its not how you do it its what you achieve in the end and how maintainable... Devs can get caught up in doing things a particular or chase something because it is cool which might not be appropriate or better. Its amazing what you can do with a small number of motivated devs

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I agree its not how you do it its what you achieve in the end and how maintainable... Devs can get caught up in doing things a particular or chase something because it is cool which might not be appropriate or better. Its amazing what you can do with a small number of motivated devs

I'd say key is getting people with enough confidence to admit when they don't know something.

Rookie coder will struggle to do something for weeks when it should be a quick job, experienced guy will say 'meh, not what i normally do, who's done this before'?

Arrogant programmer might define the architecture and refuse any changes. Decent programmer would give a sample architecture, do some form of sizing estimate based on the figures he's been given, then hand it over to be tested.

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This is why an INTJ is good for system building, they dont waste time becuase they state straight away what they dont know.

Maybe we need some INTJ's in politics? ;)

Lol just got googling - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/INTJ

Rings very true, both personally to some extent and for some of the better developers i've worked with.

"INTJs apply (often ruthlessly) the criterion "Does it work?" to everything from their own research efforts to the prevailing social norms."

Describes me pretty well at work - and you'd be surprised how many people would rather not hear that question asked till they've had a chance to waste some time on it!

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I got this when I graduated, thinking it would help. In reality I suppose the letters after your name was the reason - but it was a total waste of money! I ended it some 4years later.

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They badly let down their British members imo though because they have done nothing to speak out against things like Intra-Company transfers and outsourcing. Two things that possibly crept up on them but they weren't on the ball and did not speak out, leaving that to the PCG.

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  • 338 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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