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Three Quarters Of Workers Have Had No Pay Rise.

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They are falling for the bottom 95% and increasing for the top 5%, by any measure - CEO v workers salary multiples, % of wealth owned the the top few, relative % amount of tax paid etc.

Remember 1995? When people made their own lunch? And had instant coffee from a jar? The one big cost is housing. After that transport. Food is high but plenty of people need to learn how to cook again.

However I do appreciate many are doing all the above and are suffering. This isn't to belittle their efforts. I'm just saying I feel in a country with lots of fat people we are not yet on the brink.

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Remember 1995? When people made their own lunch? And had instant coffee from a jar? The one big cost is housing. After that transport. Food is high but plenty of people need to learn how to cook again.

However I do appreciate many are doing all the above and are suffering. This isn't to belittle their efforts. I'm just saying I feel in a country with lots of fat people we are not yet on the brink.

Indeed; I was thinking the same.

A colleague of mine worked out he spends about £500 per month just on food and drink when at work. Sushi, expensive sanwiches and posh coffee are easy to cut out.

I saved nigh on £300 PM by taking my own stuff to eat and cutting out the £3 daily coffee.

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Don't forget the self employed.

I can't raise my hourly rate in line with inflation, customers are squeezed to hard; I just work longer and get poorer

I know lots of people who now work 10 hrs a day 6 days a week, rather than 8 for 5, just to stay afloat.

I know the self employed have to put the hours in but not 10 years into a business ffs

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Don't forget the self employed.

I can't raise my hourly rate in line with inflation, customers are squeezed to hard; I just work longer and get poorer

I know lots of people who now work 10 hrs a day 6 days a week, rather than 8 for 5, just to stay afloat.

I know the self employed have to put the hours in but not 10 years into a business ffs

What do you do and where?

It's just taken me a week and lots of phone calls just to get 1 man to come to quote on some guttering work. Not a massive job, so no one's interested, so I was told by several of them.

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What do you do and where?

It's just taken me a week and lots of phone calls just to get 1 man to come to quote on some guttering work. Not a massive job, so no one's interested, so I was told by several of them.

Gardener Merseyside.

yes they have gardens in Liverpool before it starts; so much garden crime am going to become a Privet detective :P

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It's not so much income that's the problem: it's that nearly everyone spends tons on 1) housing (be they renting from a landlord or from a bank), 2) energy, and 3) random shit they really don't need/feel the need to upgrade every 12 months.

Cut out expenditure. Fit the bills to income. It's what people have had to do for centuries, then along came the credit bubble of the 00s.

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Indeed; I was thinking the same.

A colleague of mine worked out he spends about £500 per month just on food and drink when at work. Sushi, expensive sanwiches and posh coffee are easy to cut out.

I saved nigh on £300 PM by taking my own stuff to eat and cutting out the £3 daily coffee.

I do sometimes wonder how much the nation spends on coffee. My filter coffee at home is about £2.50 for a pack and that does about 20 cups. From the coffee shop that would be about £40!

Without pay rises (and I didn't get one), who can keep spending money on coffee?

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It's not so much income that's the problem: it's that nearly everyone spends tons on 1) housing (be they renting from a landlord or from a bank), 2) energy, and 3) random shit they really don't need/feel the need to upgrade every 12 months.

Cut out expenditure. Fit the bills to income. It's what people have had to do for centuries, then along came the credit bubble of the 00s.

Point 3 is the most salient from what I have seen over the last 10 years. I guess it depnds on what circle you, er, circle in.

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I do sometimes wonder how much the nation spends on coffee. My filter coffee at home is about £2.50 for a pack and that does about 20 cups. From the coffee shop that would be about £40!

Without pay rises (and I didn't get one), who can keep spending money on coffee?

I used to work with a person that spend £9 per day just on Starbucks coffee. And another £7-£10 on food from similar outlets, sometimes more. And she also spent £35 per day in travel.

Mental.

Edited by pie-eater

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Back in 97 I used to spend 45p on a can of coke 3 times per day plus about £2.50 on lunch. Then I realised I was spending £1000 pet year on lunch and snacks so I stopped doing it and made sandwiches instead. Fast forward a decade and a half and we're mortgage-free. The little expenditures really add up.

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Back in 97 I used to spend 45p on a can of coke 3 times per day plus about £2.50 on lunch. Then I realised I was spending £1000 pet year on lunch and snacks so I stopped doing it and made sandwiches instead. Fast forward a decade and a half and we're mortgage-free. The little expenditures really add up.

Probably kept diabetes at bay too.

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Andrew Verity was on Newsnight interviewing some bod who was saying that wages may go down by a quarter over the next 20 years or so, due to wage competition with developing nations.

I believe that is about right. And if the markets find that out, the UK debt crisis will be upon us in no time. Most of that cut could come sooner rather than later.

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In various economic articles with comments sections I quite often read opinions that run roughly thus:

"It's a good time to be in property, because the government will inflate our debts away".

e.g. "history will repeat itself"

Of course, what that misses is that back in the 1970s, when our (ok, my) parents had their house bought for them thanks to rampant inflation the inflation in question was both price and wage inflation.

What we now have is the former, but not the latter. And it's the latter that made the above possible. Without that debt simply becomes harder to service.

I see serious civil unrest eventually; as has been expressed, there's a whole tranche of people who could simply stop buying unnecessary "stuff" (though I think a psychological addiction may mean people have to be weaned off it reluctantly) but there's also a fair chunk of the population who can't cut back much more and will really begin to suffer.

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In various economic articles with comments sections I quite often read opinions that run roughly thus:

"It's a good time to be in property, because the government will inflate our debts away".

e.g. "history will repeat itself"

Of course, what that misses is that back in the 1970s, when our (ok, my) parents had their house bought for them thanks to rampant inflation the inflation in question was both price and wage inflation.

What we now have is the former, but not the latter. And it's the latter that made the above possible. Without that debt simply becomes harder to service.

I see serious civil unrest eventually; as has been expressed, there's a whole tranche of people who could simply stop buying unnecessary "stuff" (though I think a psychological addiction may mean people have to be weaned off it reluctantly) but there's also a fair chunk of the population who can't cut back much more and will really begin to suffer.

+1

We spent a decade spending wages we hadn't earned but believed we had. Now we're working to pay that back but only earning what we actually earn. Short Costa & Pret a Manger?

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I can vauch for this, i've had one payrise in 4 years and thats cause I threatened to quit and it went down to the last day of my contract. Every person who joined my place after me and few others before are all contractors. We've had one permanent person employeed in the whole 4 years i've been here and even that person was already with the company and just transferred over.

As contractors we get no yearly pay rises, no performance reviews, no nothing. Yet the permies who started before me got all of this plus they got bonuses in the good years. I always thought as contractors you earned more to make up the lack of security and holiday pay but every person who has joined after me has come in on a lower wage and earn less than the perms. Oh and I earn less than the average wage so were not exactly rolling in cash.

Every job I look at in my sector is contract too so its not like I can just move to a permie job instead.

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I do sometimes wonder how much the nation spends on coffee. My filter coffee at home is about £2.50 for a pack and that does about 20 cups. From the coffee shop that would be about £40!

Without pay rises (and I didn't get one), who can keep spending money on coffee?

Coffee shops are a rip-off and it's amazing how many of them you see on high streets these days. I love coffee and I won't give up the good stuff, but I don't want to overpay either. I used to own an espresso machine and that was pretty good, but my current solution is an aeropress and it's better.

These little presses make really smooth, quality coffee in the espresso style (I drink black, unsweetened Americano style most of the time). All you need is a little elbow grease. Everyone I know who has tried coffee from the press has been impressed by it. I have one at work and one at home. My parents, brother and sister now all have them. A friend at work got one for her husband. My mum's friend got one for camping. etc.

The cost of aeropress filters is negligible so you just have to pay for the coffee, which I now buy in bulk from Amazon strangely enough. B)

Q

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It's not so much income that's the problem: it's that nearly everyone spends tons on 1) housing (be they renting from a landlord or from a bank), 2) energy, and 3) random shit they really don't need/feel the need to upgrade every 12 months.

Cut out expenditure. Fit the bills to income. It's what people have had to do for centuries, then along came the credit bubble of the 00s.

Correct....we have all got spoilt spending the new easy money credit on life's little luxuries and have got used to getting what we want when we want.....the only problem is the economy has got reliant on this continuous spending, its a vicious spiral of continuous debt to feed continuous debt....until the system changes, all that is left to do is play the game the best way that suits your own personal circumstances. ;)

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Gardener Merseyside.

yes they have gardens in Liverpool before it starts; so much garden crime am going to become a Privet detective :P

Is it true you cannot close your windows as you may be sued for trapping someones fingers :lol:

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Probably kept diabetes at bay too.

You worry about that - check the coke-fizz consumption >>>

Most consumers don't know that too much Phenylalanine is a neurotoxin and excites the neurons in the brain to the point of cellular death. ADD/ADHD, emotional and behavioral disorders can all be triggered by too much Phenylalanine in the daily diet. If you are one in ten thousand people who are PKU or carry the PKU gene, Phenylalanine can cause irreversible brain damage and death, especially when used in high quantities or during pregnancy. Phenylalanine is 50% of aspartame, and to the degree humans consume diet products, Phenylalanine levels are reaching a dangerous peak.

I was doing some research into excess Fluoride where the Govt add it into the local water supply.

Cows being milked drink up to 60 gallons of water a day!

If you drink the local fluoridated water (like in Sarfhampton area) then consume the local cream and milk - the fluoride is concentrated in those products - so people/kids encouraged to drink the milk "for strong bones" are getting an overdose!

The fluoride situation is far, far worse in mega concentrated cheese

Check the area where major supermarket cheese suppliers are located and the local water supply

ie check the factory address on your cheese packet - then look up the local water supply for added fluoride and almost guaranteed your cheese is contaminated with massive concentration of the stuff!

You will be shocked and it is a UK national scandal - deliberate slow poisoning of the population!

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Indeed; I was thinking the same.

A colleague of mine worked out he spends about £500 per month just on food and drink when at work. Sushi, expensive sanwiches and posh coffee are easy to cut out.

I saved nigh on £300 PM by taking my own stuff to eat and cutting out the £3 daily coffee.

A great habit to get into which I did when on a slightly above average wage. Now on a lot more but either have lunch at home (live nearby) or get a freebie if out in the field.

The only time I buy a coffee at a nearby outlet is when its with a group of colleagues and it is social rather than need.

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I can see many companies following this trend of pay freezing or even cutting of wages whether they need to or not ;)

That's happened where I work, at an independent school.

Next year's pay "rise" is 1%. We were told:

1) there's a recession on, times are hard;

2) the public sector got 0%, so we should think ourselves lucky.

Yet, the school's fully subscribed :huh:

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  • 331 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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