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Children 'should Be Allowed To Leave School At 14', Claims Former Cbi Chief

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The former Labour Trade Minister said British businesses are struggling through a lack of skilled young people, meaning employers are forced to hire workers from overseas.

Allowing youngsters to embark on vocational training and get jobs at 14 would fill the skills gap while stimulating economic growth through increased spending, Lord Jones said

Then it 'll be 10.

http://www.telegraph...-CBI-chief.html

What 14 has the skills to fill the skill gap? do 14 year old have any skills?

Edited by crash2006

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They should have thought about this before deciding everybody should stay *in* education until they were in their twenties studying for bits of paper which have proven to be worthless in most cases.

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Children did leave school at 14 My uncle did it , he would be about 85 now if still alive . My brother who is 50 just missed leaving at 15 as they put the age up to 16 a few years before he was due to leave . Now they have just raised it again to 18 ( no one said much ) as what difference does it make when there is little for the young people to due whether they leave or stay on.

Over the years many people have said let them leave at 14 , but it will never happen so why bother .

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Come the revolution Fatby Jones and his ilk will be boiled alive for glue or something. Total waste of space. Low skill/wage economy living in shanty towns would suit Fatby down to the ground.

Capitalists like him are a total failure, and have failed to provide the jobs. We were lied to during the days of Norman Tebbitt and "and on your bike." And "if only we have more labour market reforms." The jobs were not forthcoming then, and won't be in the future.

"If only we could have child labour" and then "if only we could have slave labour."

Morally bankrupt businessmen trying to shore up the economics of the madhouse.

Edited by John Steed

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The only reason somebody Lord Jones would want somebody to be able to go to work at 14 is that they could be paid less than the National Minimum Wage for a 16 year old.

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In other words, CBI chief is looking for slave/child-laborers that can be paid a pittance since NMW would obviously be lower for teenagers.

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Fantastic, let's go back to Victorian times and divide the class system even more.

Introducing national service for teenagers that don't pursue further education, now there's an idea...

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It's difficult to imagine this man being more odious.

Yet he lowers the bar with every utterance from his obese gob.

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Last year I was considering becoming a secondary school teacher and spent some time watching classes in state schools to get a feel for what it might be like. Having seen what goes on there, I completely agree with people being allowed to leave at 14 if that's what they choose.

14 is really the age where attention-seeking behaviour (usually with its roots in trouble at home) becomes amplified by hormones into seriously disruptive classroom behaviour, to the detriment of classmates and the teacher. If somebody with self control problems hasn't learned their 3 Rs by 14, they're not going to do it between 14 and 16 when they won't even sit down and open a book. Forcing somebody like that to stay in the classroom just makes them feel angry and humiliated, so they lash out in ways that take up huge amounts of time from teachers and teaching assistants.

Let them go and make their own mistakes outside the classroom. They'll learn a lot more there than they will sulking through two years of BTEC science.

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Makes sense. Some teenagers take no interest in school. Those teenagers aren't going to learn, and are far more likely to disrupt their peers. Or play truant and get into trouble. Far better if they can officially get out into the world, and take whatever work comes their way. And if they lack the basics (3 rs) by - say - the end of primary school at 11, school has failed them and more of the same looks like a poor solution.

They can resume their studies as and when they're ready to do so.

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For some where it shows they will not benefit from further formal education I think it is a great idea as long as it is supported by the mentors in the working environment....many would benefit from it if only we give them the chance to use their creative skills and nurture them in the right direction and not exploited......I know further education is a waste of time for some....we are all different and we all learn in different ways....am all for it, the more viable options there are the better imo. ;)

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Makes sense. Some teenagers take no interest in school. Those teenagers aren't going to learn, and are far more likely to disrupt their peers. Or play truant and get into trouble. Far better if they can officially get out into the world, and take whatever work comes their way. And if they lack the basics (3 rs) by - say - the end of primary school at 11, school has failed them and more of the same looks like a poor solution.

They can resume their studies as and when they're ready to do so.

+1

Or, as an incentive, say that anyone over the age of 13/14/15 (select your preferred age) can leave school AS SOON AS they have passed a fairly basic leavers exam. this would provide an incentive to work at the basics which most of them are perfectly capable of doing. 17 year olds will put in the hours to pass the driving test without a second thought.

Those who really are incapable are probably best kept in some form of education as they are likely to be unemplyable as well - though I grant that some Downs syndrome kids are very conscientious workers within their limitations.

Edited by cartimandua51

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I can't believe some posters on here actually back this concept. The reality is that if a child (and at 14 they are still a child) is disruptive at school, they are not going to be a model employee - that's if there is even work for them.

Disruptive behaviour stems from different complex issues outside of the classroom and to write these kids off would be a pity. I'm all for youngsters learning blue collar skills if they choose but it should be part of an education system and not just as an excuse for cheap labour.

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I can't believe some posters on here actually back this concept. The reality is that if a child (and at 14 they are still a child) is disruptive at school, they are not going to be a model employee - that's if there is even work for them.

Disruptive behaviour stems from different complex issues outside of the classroom and to write these kids off would be a pity. I'm all for youngsters learning blue collar skills if they choose but it should be part of an education system and not just as an excuse for cheap labour.

1. School should not be used as a holding pen for the young unemployed.

2. Leaving school at 14 to pursue something else is not writing somebody off. A 21 year old who got himself an apprenticeship and a trade starting at 14 will be in a much better position than a 21 year old graduate in tourism studies from the University of Chichester.

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For some where it shows they will not benefit from further formal education I think it is a great idea as long as it is supported by the mentors in the working environment....many would benefit from it if only we give them the chance to use their creative skills and nurture them in the right direction and not exploited......I know further education is a waste of time for some....we are all different and we all learn in different ways....am all for it, the more viable options there are the better imo. ;)

I couldn't agree more.

I left school on my 15th birthday and went to the 'Youth Employment Office' to get a job. They told me that I couldn't leave school for another six months, but as I was adamant, they turned a blind eye and found me a job. I worked at a variety of jobs, the last one being sales manager for an engineering firm, before I started my own business at age 28. If I needed qualifications, I employed them ;).

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1. School should not be used as a holding pen for the young unemployed.

I agree that schools should not be holding pens. Schools should be a safe learning environment and the focus should be on kids that want to learn- not on some disruptive kids. The majority of disruptive kids in my school went on to be career criminals so I don't buy into the idea that they should leave school early.

2. Leaving school at 14 to pursue something else is not writing somebody off. A 21 year old who got himself an apprenticeship and a trade starting at 14 will be in a much better position than a 21 year old graduate in tourism studies from the University of Chichester.

You're making an assumption that 14 year olds would actually want to leave school and work. We all know the UK has a problem with teenagers skipping school and hanging around the streets drinking and misbehaving. If kids were allowed to leave school early then social problems would only get worse. Sure, some kids are not academics and would like to pursue manual work but IMO 16/17 is a good age to start an apprenticeship.

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You're making an assumption that 14 year olds would actually want to leave school and work.

I couldn't wait, the only reason I stayed on until I was 15 was the law, my heart wasn't in it though.

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I couldn't wait, the only reason I stayed on until I was 15 was the law, my heart wasn't in it though.

Entrepreneurs like yourself are sadly in the minority.

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I can't believe some posters on here actually back this concept. The reality is that if a child (and at 14 they are still a child) is disruptive at school, they are not going to be a model employee - that's if there is even work for them.

Disruptive behaviour stems from different complex issues outside of the classroom and to write these kids off would be a pity. I'm all for youngsters learning blue collar skills if they choose but it should be part of an education system and not just as an excuse for cheap labour.

Why on earth do you think that teachers are qualified or inclined to solve these problems? They can't solve these kid's parent's drink, drug, mental or behavioral problems, or reverse the damage that has been inflicted on them.

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If 14 year olds were allowed into the workplace these days all their co-workers would have to be CRB checked, at great expense.

Someone hasn't thought this through.

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If 14 year olds were allowed into the workplace these days all their co-workers would have to be CRB checked, at great expense.

Someone hasn't thought this through.

It would be easy enough to change the rules.

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Anyone would think he wanted to ban education of the over 14s, for some of the comments here!

He is just saying that children shouldn't be imprisoned daily in school until 16/18 (whichever it is now). Children have rights too and they shouldn't be forced to stay at school if they don't want to.

EDIT: BTW, my dad left at 14/15 and worked in his dad's shop for a few years. At 17, he realised he wanted to go to uni, did some A-levels and was studying for a degree in electrical engineering by 18. Nothing wrong with that, IMO.

Edited by Traktion

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1. School should not be used as a holding pen for the young unemployed.

2. Leaving school at 14 to pursue something else is not writing somebody off. A 21 year old who got himself an apprenticeship and a trade starting at 14 will be in a much better position than a 21 year old graduate in tourism studies from the University of Chichester.

They should only be allowed to leave only if they can be accomodated elsewhere and offered training/learning that they can deal with and have some enthusiasm for.

For many kids they have no interest in the periodic table or drawing a bowl of fruit for an art assessment, but they may have more aptitude and interest if they were encouraged to follow a more practical and more obviously benifical teaching. The discipline of a workplace based training would be good for many and may be beneficial in the long term for their future employment prospects.

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