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Alexj

Enf Of Tenancy Cleaning

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Is this a good idea or a really, really BAD idea?!

I'm due to move out of a rented house that is on a periodic tenancy next week and I've had quotes totalling £500 for cleaning the carpets, washing the windows and doing an end of tenancy professional clean. My deposit is £3000 and I am expecting to get it all back as I haven't done any damage. I was thinking of asking the landlord if he would agree to keep the £500 from my deposit and use the money to clean the house once he has done the renovation work he plans to do before the new tenants move in..

I've got a busy week next week and to be honest I could do without the hassle of coming back after I leave to check up on the work done by the professional cleaners. The landlord is apparently planning to repaint a couple of rooms, replace some carpets, put in a new oven and cut down some trees in the garden.

The neighbours and the ex-tenants also tell me that he always tries to keep as much of the deposit as possible, often with false claims of damage or things missing. Last time it went to adjudication and he lost. The neighbours all seem to feverently dislike the landlord and his wife and they genuinely get upset if they think they will eventually come and live in the house themselves. (I write this to show that he's famed for being difficult and unpleasant).

Apart from less things to take care of next week, the upside for me, is that the cleaning bills won't be paid out the cash that's in my bank account but instead from money that is already tied up in the deposit. The upside for the landlord is that he will get a free clean when he needs it, rather than just before he messes the house up with the renovations. However, can anyone think of a way that the landlord could use this against me to hold onto more of my deposit than just the £500?

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bump.

Has anyone got experience of leaving a difficult landlord who is inclined to try to keep as much of the deposit as possible? Would I be playing into his hands?

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Get it done while you are still in the house, and document the end result like crazy. Ideally you want to be present for the inspection, as humiliating and unpleasant as these things usually are. Once you have handed over the keys you are in a much weaker position.

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Is it in the contract that such cleaning will be done? or morelikely that it will be cleaned to a professional standard (you can then be very professional about it and buy a vax/hire a steamer), if not and you've been clean then fair wear and tear would apply and he can have nowt of the deposit. When he tries to take the money make a claim and screw him to the wall for it.

Take lots of digital photos of every square inch just prior to the inspection but don't let the fecker know about them so when he makes spurrious claims for damage he'll look a tool and any other assertions by him will seem less than truthful.

Edit:Is your deposit actually protected,check with the 3 agencies, if not he can't keep a penny and the courts will award its full return no matter what you do to clean up.

Edited by zebbedee

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Did you have an inventory at the start of your tenancy that accurately reflects the state of the property?

Is your deposit covered somewhere?

My experience was with a LL that kept part of a deposit and then had the flat renovated for her son. She then had the property cleaned and produced invoices to prove it. I has the original inventory where I catalogued the dirtiness of the flat and how the LL had failed to clean it.

This was before the deposits scheme and my LL was judged to be trying to "better" the property with my deposit as the cleaning was done after renovations and this included removing paint from things.

I kept photos of how the flat looked when I moved out. Used these in court to show how clean it was.

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The deposit is in a scheme. It was put in a month after the tenancy started and I was only given the documents a year after that, but it is in a scheme today (I checked).

I wasn't there for the check-in inventory - I was stuck in traffic and it went ahead without me (which I now regret). I only saw that document a year ago too (13 months after I moved in). Its more or less accurate but it gets some things wrong e.g. it says the wooden garden furniture is in good condition whereas its actually crumbling and I think it would disintegrate if I touched it (so i haven't). It did say the house was domestically clean at the time of check-in though.

My AST was only for 12 months and it expired a year ago. I was asked to sign a new one, but I didn't and everyone (the agent & landlord) seemed to forget about it so I am on a periodic tenancy instead now. Do the terms of the AST still apply even when the AST has expired? The AST required that I have a professional clean done.

In any case, wouldn't requiring a professional clean to be done when the house has only been domestically cleaned be an example of betterment, which would be an unfair 9(and therefore unenforceable) term?

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I will take the advice about photographing everything and keeping quiet. I know the landlord has plans to replace things and on past performance he will want me to pay for them.

I've tried to circumvent this by emailing the agency to ask that since they are due to be replaced, do these things really need to be cleaned? (They are two carpets and the oven). The agent replied that the LL is undecided about whether he will replace these things or not and I replied that I am surprised to read this as the new tenants have made it a condition of their offer.

It won't stop the LL trying to use my deposit to pay for these things, but it does provide documented evidence of a timeline for his decision to replace these things anyway so he can't say later that he decided to replace them when he learned of their condition at check out. (They are both just old and worn BTW - pretty much as they were when I moved in)

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That's exactly what I faced in the small claims court. A domestic clean is not the same as a professional clean. Those are the things that the judge considered as betterment (ie. asking me to return the flat in a better condition).

These are eaxctly the points you can make at a tribunel. The inventory needs to be kept and presented. In the future if you miss this part, document any changes / problems and send these as a registered letter as soon as you can after moving in. That's what I have been doing and it's been fine in the small claims court.

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I will take the advice about photographing everything and keeping quiet. I know the landlord has plans to replace things and on past performance he will want me to pay for them.

I've tried to circumvent this by emailing the agency to ask that since they are due to be replaced, do these things really need to be cleaned? (They are two carpets and the oven). The agent replied that the LL is undecided about whether he will replace these things or not and I replied that I am surprised to read this as the new tenants have made it a condition of their offer.

It won't stop the LL trying to use my deposit to pay for these things, but it does provide documented evidence of a timeline for his decision to replace these things anyway so he can't say later that he decided to replace them when he learned of their condition at check out. (They are both just old and worn BTW - pretty much as they were when I moved in)

He can't replace things at your cost, only things that have been broken or damaged by you and even then cannot replace new for old (he'd have to find things in a second hand shop of comparable age and condition to the ones broken or damaged) otherwise its betterment. Who is to say what a professionally cleaned standard is?

The fecker may well try it on, if he does simply put in writing that you expect return of the full deposit (making an offer without prejudice for any fair deductions) or you will pursue the matter through the courts and will also be seeking costs. If that doesn't get him to pay up use the small claims route and when that lands on his mat he'll no doubt cough up.

Edited by zebbedee

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Personally I would not spend a penny on a clean, I'd give it a bit of a going over myself if you could tell it plainly hadn't been done just by looking at it. Which is all the letting agent is going to do. In my experience paying for a clean at the end of the tenancy has always been a mistake. Before the tds came in, all it meant was the agency and/or landlord stole my deposit based on fictional reasons, and i was out of pocket for the clean as well. With the tds it seems to be too much hassle for them to bother just stealing the deposit as a matter of course as they used to, but you might be unlucky and find they try it on anyway. Whether you have shelled out for a cleaner is completely irrelevant to what they claim in my experience, if they're going to try and steal from you they've made their mind up to do it before they've seen the place and a sparkly place isn't going to change their mind one way or another.

My advice, never pay to clean. Pre tds it makes no difference they steal your money anyway, post tds it makes no difference, if they can be bothered to try it on they'll do it anyway no matter what you did. You're throwing money away paying for a clean.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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