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How To Change A Lightbulb

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Councils throughout the UK have been changing lightbulbs this way for a few years now. No more stepladders its now scaffold and has pushed the costs up by many 000's %. Great to see taxpayer money spent in such an austere manner :unsure:

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Slightly OT, but changing lightbulb jokes are endemic in the cinema industry. Projectors use short arc xenon bulbs, which consist of a quartz envelope containing the cathode and anode, and filled with xenon gas at very high pressure (typically 400-500 PSI, compared to 25-35 in a typical car tyre). Obviously you do not want these to explode while handling them, hence projectionists are supposed to wear a protective helmet, ballistic jacket and protective gloves whenever they have a lamphouse open. I always operated a non-negotiable rule whereby a second person (didn't have to be a trained projectionist, but did have to be someone who could call for help if necessary) was also present and also wearing the safety gear whenever a maintenance job was being done that involved opening a lamphouse, hence jokes about how many people did it take to change a lightbulb. I did once have a bulb explode, when the cinema in which I worked re-opened after a two-week closure caused by flooding. About 2-3 minutes after lighting the bulb there was an almighty bang that left ringing in our ears, black smoke pouring out of every vent hole in the lamphouse and dents in the steel plate that formed the side of it. I suspect that condensation had built up on the bulb surface, and that is what caused the explosion. We had a lot more respect for the things after that.

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Slightly OT, but changing lightbulb jokes are endemic in the cinema industry. Projectors use short arc xenon bulbs, which consist of a quartz envelope containing the cathode and anode, and filled with xenon gas at very high pressure (typically 400-500 PSI, compared to 25-35 in a typical car tyre). Obviously you do not want these to explode while handling them, hence projectionists are supposed to wear a protective helmet, ballistic jacket and protective gloves whenever they have a lamphouse open. I always operated a non-negotiable rule whereby a second person (didn't have to be a trained projectionist, but did have to be someone who could call for help if necessary) was also present and also wearing the safety gear whenever a maintenance job was being done that involved opening a lamphouse, hence jokes about how many people did it take to change a lightbulb. I did once have a bulb explode, when the cinema in which I worked re-opened after a two-week closure caused by flooding. About 2-3 minutes after lighting the bulb there was an almighty bang that left ringing in our ears, black smoke pouring out of every vent hole in the lamphouse and dents in the steel plate that formed the side of it. I suspect that condensation had built up on the bulb surface, and that is what caused the explosion. We had a lot more respect for the things after that.

Projectionist? Surely those things are automated these days? Hell even in the 1998 novel Fight Club Tyler is replaced by a self loading machine. 2011 surely they just bring in a massive massive HDD or SDD and plug it into the projector. Hell they might as well just download it to the cinema even.

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Digital projection was not used on any significant scale until around 2006-07. When I left the industry in 2001 35mm film was still almost universal, because no digital imaging technology existed that could match its resolution and colour depth for the same overall distribution costs (today's film emulsions will give you an equivalent resolution of about 30,000 to 40,000dpi). From what I gather the use of film is now in rapid decline, but this process only started in the last 2-3 years. There were also technical standards issues that had to be sorted out, encryption for piracy prevention being a big one. And incidentally, DLP projectors use the same light source as film projectors before them, and those bulbs still require safety precautions in handling. They typically have a lifetime of 1,500 to 2,000 hours, which in normal multiplex use is 3-4 months; and so I suspect that in a digital scenario, a technician employed centrally by the chain (or in the case of small chains and independents, from a third-party service company) will make periodic visits to replace them.

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Councils throughout the UK have been changing lightbulbs this way for a few years now. No more stepladders its now scaffold and has pushed the costs up by many 000's %. Great to see taxpayer money spent in such an austere manner :unsure:

i work at height sometimes , we are trained to use the mewps ,have to risk assess to comply with their[the clients} h&s /insurance etc, sure its a pain but it loads up the cost of the job re training /plant/ time so we charge a lot more, we happy, they are happy ,insurance company happy and no employee sueing you for fallin off ladder .....everybody happy. thats business :):):)

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I dont get it. the hilarity

its the law. working at height regs 2005.

unless councils should start ignoring the law maybe, but how is that hilarious

If that's the law you don't find the law hilariously over the top?

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If that's the law you don't find the law hilariously over the top?

no not really.

there is a zero tolerance to injury at work and quite rightly so.

thats what the regs are designed for.

unless people think a little injury here and there is alright.

snapped ligament while falling off a ladder while changing a crappy little council light bulb. thats six weeks of pain and hardship and no more sunday football in the park again, for you my son. now wheres the tax payer for a bit of compo.

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no not really.

there is a zero tolerance to injury at work and quite rightly so.

thats what the regs are designed for.

unless people think a little injury here and there is alright.

snapped ligament while falling off a ladder while changing a crappy little council light bulb. thats six weeks of pain and hardship and no more sunday football in the park again, for you my son. now wheres the tax payer for a bit of compo.

Perhaps you should've been a little more careful on the ladder. Crap happens no matter what regulations and ever more ludicrous methods you have in place. All you can do is reduceit, not eliminate it, and it gets to a point (which we've gone past) where it causes more problems than it saves. So yes, a little injury here and there is alright, or at least more acceptable than the alternatives. If you really believed that only zero risk was acceptable you'd never do anything. Using a ladder is safe enough if you don't do anything silly. Would you use one at home? You were more likely to snap a ligment playing the football.

No wonder it so little gets done and it costs a bloody fortune to do it. Thank you for being a little responsible for this over-taxed, over-priced messed-up country.

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Perhaps you should've been a little more careful on the ladder. Crap happens no matter what regulations and ever more ludicrous methods you have in place. All you can do is reduceit, not eliminate it, and it gets to a point (which we've gone past) where it causes more problems than it saves. So yes, a little injury here and there is alright, or at least more acceptable than the alternatives. If you really believed that only zero risk was acceptable you'd never do anything. Using a ladder is safe enough if you don't do anything silly. Would you use one at home? You were more likely to snap a ligment playing the football.

No wonder it so little gets done and it costs a bloody fortune to do it. Thank you for being a little responsible for this over-taxed, over-priced messed-up country.

i said the idea is to eliminate all injuries and deaths at work. it may never happen but the goal is there.

i am fully aware in life you cant eliminate all risk, but i never said you could.

ladders are the biggest cause of injury and death at work so not quite "safe enough", and in general 'most' people dont go up ladders to do something silly at the top.

so a 'little injury here and there is alright' . could you quantify that for me. would it be maybe a lost finger, a little concussion, maybe a touch of disfigurement to the face, a broken arm maybe. i suppose all of these are okay though as they only apply to the ten pound an hour monkeys who do all the silly jobs in society like changing lightbulbs and fixing roofs.

as for nothing getting done in this over taxed messed up country maybe you should get yourself on a plane and go see how the majority of the rest of the world live. its not perfect here but lets face it we have never had as much wealth, freetime and good health here in uk right now. or have you imagined a mythical golden age in some other country.

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i said the idea is to eliminate all injuries and deaths at work. it may never happen but the goal is there.

i am fully aware in life you cant eliminate all risk, but i never said you could.

The goal is to aim for it without making it too inconvenient. There's more that could be done in the van changing the bulb example - where's the support under the bucket in case the hydraulics fail? It's not there because it's been decided that it's a lot of addtional inconvenience for very little extra gain. There's always something else you can dream up to combat increasingly unlikely accidents, but eventually you go ahead without them because you accept that sometimes, someone will get hurt and the job needs doing.

ladders are the biggest cause of injury and death at work so not quite "safe enough", and in general 'most' people dont go up ladders to do something silly at the top.

So? Something will always be the biggest.

so a 'little injury here and there is alright' . could you quantify that for me. would it be maybe a lost finger, a little concussion, maybe a touch of disfigurement to the face, a broken arm maybe. i suppose all of these are okay though as they only apply to the ten pound an hour monkeys who do all the silly jobs in society like changing lightbulbs and fixing roofs.

A childish response. For example, I don't really care about the scar on my leg where I managed to gouge it open at school. That would cause a massive hue and cry these days. And because a little injury here and there will always happen then you're OK with that too. That's life. There's always a point where stopping someone getting hurt isn't worth the extra time and expense.

as for nothing getting done in this over taxed messed up country maybe you should get yourself on a plane and go see how the majority of the rest of the world live. its not perfect here but lets face it we have never had as much wealth, freetime and good health here in uk right now. or have you imagined a mythical golden age in some other country.

Another stupid reply. "Somewhere else is a mess so we can ignore the problems here because they aren't as bad." We've also never had as much restrictive mind-bumbing red tape getting in the way of doing things. Sure, there's been rather too much acceptance of injuries and deaths in the past. It's swung too far the other way now.

Thankfully I'm capable of getting on with things without crapping myself at the thought of what could go wrong, and accepting the odd bump and scrap and maybe even broken arm. I can also distinguish between the genuinely dangerous and what's only likely to hurt me if I screw up, such as by trying to swing backwards and forwards at the top of a ladder. I would be perfectly willing to go up an ordinary stepladder at work to change a lightbulb (but the paranoid buggers wouldn't let me). If the ladder wasn't stable then I should've put it up better. Entirely my own fault unless someone else put it there and told me to go up or else. Just as the same as when I tripped up and twisted my ankle on some stairs. That was at home, whether it's home or work I don't really care. I'm not being asked to juggle hand grenades or go swimming in shark-infested waters. What is a concern is the risk of injury from banging my head against the hard desk when I read posts like yours. Perhaps all desks should be padded, just to be on the safe side. And I shouldn't be allowed to have the cup of tea I'm drinking either, could easily spill that and scald myself. Cold water is sufficient if I'm thirsty.

Better not reply to this in case you get RSI from the typing.

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The goal is to aim for it without making it too inconvenient. There's more that could be done in the van changing the bulb example - where's the support under the bucket in case the hydraulics fail? It's not there because it's been decided that it's a lot of addtional inconvenience for very little extra gain. There's always something else you can dream up to combat increasingly unlikely accidents, but eventually you go ahead without them because you accept that sometimes, someone will get hurt and the job needs doing.

So? Something will always be the biggest.

A childish response. For example, I don't really care about the scar on my leg where I managed to gouge it open at school. That would cause a massive hue and cry these days. And because a little injury here and there will always happen then you're OK with that too. That's life. There's always a point where stopping someone getting hurt isn't worth the extra time and expense.

Another stupid reply. "Somewhere else is a mess so we can ignore the problems here because they aren't as bad." We've also never had as much restrictive mind-bumbing red tape getting in the way of doing things. Sure, there's been rather too much acceptance of injuries and deaths in the past. It's swung too far the other way now.

Thankfully I'm capable of getting on with things without crapping myself at the thought of what could go wrong, and accepting the odd bump and scrap and maybe even broken arm. I can also distinguish between the genuinely dangerous and what's only likely to hurt me if I screw up, such as by trying to swing backwards and forwards at the top of a ladder. I would be perfectly willing to go up an ordinary stepladder at work to change a lightbulb (but the paranoid buggers wouldn't let me). If the ladder wasn't stable then I should've put it up better. Entirely my own fault unless someone else put it there and told me to go up or else. Just as the same as when I tripped up and twisted my ankle on some stairs. That was at home, whether it's home or work I don't really care. I'm not being asked to juggle hand grenades or go swimming in shark-infested waters. What is a concern is the risk of injury from banging my head against the hard desk when I read posts like yours. Perhaps all desks should be padded, just to be on the safe side. And I shouldn't be allowed to have the cup of tea I'm drinking either, could easily spill that and scald myself. Cold water is sufficient if I'm thirsty.

Better not reply to this in case you get RSI from the typing.

good points well made.

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Or LED lighting - good for 30 years, by which time we'll be sending robots up the ladder.

But, once you take into account the cost of the bulb and its electricity consumption over its lifetime, more expensive than using sodium bulbs (I seem to remember from a previous thread on this topic).

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no not really.

there is a zero tolerance to injury at work and quite rightly so.

thats what the regs are designed for.

unless people think a little injury here and there is alright.

snapped ligament while falling off a ladder while changing a crappy little council light bulb. thats six weeks of pain and hardship and no more sunday football in the park again, for you my son. now wheres the tax payer for a bit of compo.

Has it not occurred to you that we, the human race, seem to be the only species actively trying to dilute the quality of our gene pool?

From my experience any manager who says ‘Safety is our number one priority’ is a liar, I was going to say deluded fool but they know exactly what they are doing. It’s all about the transferral of responsibility; you make a job so overwhelmingly cumbersome with red tape, but fulfil you’re responsibilities, safe in the knowledge that to achieve ‘goals’ people below you will have to cut the corners for you.

Plausible deniability.

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But, once you take into account the cost of the bulb and its electricity consumption over its lifetime, more expensive than using sodium bulbs (I seem to remember from a previous thread on this topic).

Sodium bulbs are, AFAICT, the best option for street lighting but the future for domestic lighting looks like being LED. They're not quite there yet (colour and making bright enough ones being the issues) but show a lot of promise. One of the few developments that I actually like :)

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Reliability is another issue. I have LED bulbs in my flat and have now had two fail within a year, one in the kitchen and one in the bathroom. I presume that the problem is susceptibility to moisture. Both were bought online and so the cost of returning them makes doing so not worth it (I paid a fiver for each bulb), but I'm not going to be putting replacement LED bulbs in there until this issue is sorted. The ones in my living room and bedroom are about two years old now, and absolutely great. The high colour temperature virtually eliminates eye strain when reading, for one thing.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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