Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

SarahBell

Doctor Asks If You Have A Will

Recommended Posts

Suppose your elderly parents visit the doctors. The doctor asks if they have made a will during the consultation.

What do you think? Acceptable? Creepy? Shipmanesque?

Or maybe it's fine?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creepy yet sensible. Everyone should make a will but is it really your GP's business? If it was the cashier at your local filling station you'd tell them to keep their nose out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite apart from the obvious issues of disposal of property, you also have to think about issues such as enduring power of attorney - if someone is getting on, it is much easier to sort this out when they have their wits about them...rather than when they don't.

You want their wishes clear when they are able to make it clear. Perfectly reasonable question for a GP to ask IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doctors should ask people in their 20s that question, if they are abusing themselves too much. Might bring them to their senses.

'You are drinking too much. I will suggest a course of treatment, but to cover all bases, may I also recommend a good undertaker?'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little tactless and outside his or her area, I would say. But I think medical professionals are sometimes a bit brusque about this sort of thing as they see death regularly.

However, if he or she is talking about a 'living will' or power of attorney, then yes, anyone gettting on in years should consider this. It doesn't have to be activated until it is necessary, but the person in question has to be of sound mind to sign it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently spent an evening with some friends who are GPs. The conversation got around to living wills and they both were of the opinion that living wills are a must for anyone who wants to have control of their medical treatment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before others post suggestions perhaps it would be wise for OP to post if this was an inheritance type will or a medical treatment living will. I believe her father is undergoing tests for a possible serious illness.

If the GP was talking about a medical treatment living will then it is entirely within his remit and indeed a kindness to do so - in order that treatment is planned and with full agreement with the patient.

+1..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suppose your elderly parents visit the doctors. The doctor asks if they have made a will during the consultation.

What do you think? Acceptable? Creepy? Shipmanesque?

Or maybe it's fine?

Cross-selling due to impending cuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doctors see first-hand the stress that can result from people not making wills.

For example, one child looks after aging parent for years, nurses that parent and then, within hours of that parent passing on, one or two other children, who did not come near their parent in years, turn up to make a claim on the house, the savings, etc.

I think it all depends on the context in which the Doctor asked the question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently spent an evening with some friends who are GPs. The conversation got around to living wills and they both were of the opinion that living wills are a must for anyone who wants to have control of their medical treatment.

I have recently made a 'living will' on behalf of my mother, who is 93 and has bad Alzheimer's, is also very frail and not a bit happy.

It's been signed by all 4 of her children. We've asked that she be given no medication whatever except for all possible relief of pain/distress, and no treatment whatever except for anything like fractures or other injuries. Basically, nothing intended to prolong her life or 'improve' her health with the effect of prolonging her life.

I told the care home manager that I was intending to do this, half expecting some sort of objection, but he made absolutely none.

A couple of weeks ago I spent a lot of time at the bedside of a much-loved aunt (nearly 87) , who was obviously dying, and had to watch the excellent and very kind staff at the care home trying to get food, water, antibiotics down her (she had a urinary infection) when she clearly didn't want any of it and just wanted to be left quietly to drift off.

Even the staff said they knew it was no use (or even very kind) to do this, but they felt obliged to, since nobody had previously instructed them otherwise.

However I had still found it very hard when asked initially by the home whether to leave her there or take her to hospital, where they'd have shoved drips and feeding tubes into her. I could only ask the extremely nice GP what he'd do if it were his aunt, and he said he'd leave her in relative peace where she was, in familiar surroundings.

Edit: re the OP, I think this could be seen as very tactless, or even brutal.

Not really within the GP's remit, surely?

However, it remains a fact that 2 out of 3 people in the UK don't make wills, and that if no heirs can be found, any money goes to the government. (Yes, I do watch Heir Hunters now and then.)

Good enough reason to make one, IMO, and to make sure your money goes to your choice of heir, whether it's old friend or dogs' home, and not to some far-flung 2nd cousin who's never even heard of you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: purely inheritance / financial wills, I think it's perfectly reasonable for the GP to mention it. Within all the things that are going on it may be useful to just get a reminder to sort the admin out. Anything more than a reminder would be likely to overstep the mark.

It all depends on the context of the consultation and relationship.

It'd be similar to whether it is appropriate for a friend to mention an inheritance will - it all depends.

For me, if my GP asked me this I'd stomp off in a huff. If, however, I was undergoing various tests fearing the worst, it may be a useful reminder and I may well thank him for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.