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China's High-Speed Train Derails

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http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/24_03.html

China's Xinhua news agency says two high-speed trains collided on Saturday in the eastern province of Zhejiang, killing at least 16 people and injuring more than 100 others.

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/chinese-bullet-train-derailed

The huge investment has made the sector a hotbed for corruption. China's state auditor has said construction companies and individuals last year siphoned off 187 million yuan ($29 million) from the Beijing-Shanghai project.

Bulleter%20Train.jpg

This picture is just doesn't appear real it looks like something out of a Thunderbird set.

It will be interesting to know why this happened, a result of tragic bad luck or a sign of poor investment, corruption and bad workmanship. Maybe China's high speed network will end up like the UK's rail network with trains travelling around at 30mph.

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Thanks to an impulse airport bookshop purchase, I've recently finished Red for Danger, a satisfyingly gruesome history of railway accidents written in the mid-50s, covering the preceding century. The overwhelming impression you get of the Victorian period especially was that trains crashing, exploding and cremating their occupants was a more-or-less routine occurrence, and that as with all forms of mechanised transport, safety improvements were essentially a case of learning from trial and error. Given China's current state of economic development and without wanting to sound callous, one railway accident claiming 16 lives hardly strikes me as evidence of systemic failure.

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Thanks to an impulse airport bookshop purchase, I've recently finished Red for Danger, a satisfyingly gruesome history of railway accidents written in the mid-50s, covering the preceding century. The overwhelming impression you get of the Victorian period especially was that trains crashing, exploding and cremating their occupants was a more-or-less routine occurrence, and that as with all forms of mechanised transport, safety improvements were essentially a case of learning from trial and error. Given China's current state of economic development and without wanting to sound callous, one railway accident claiming 16 lives hardly strikes me as evidence of systemic failure.

Makes me a little bit worried about the current drives to concentrate as much of the control of the railways as possible into a very small number of locations (besides the fact that the loss of all the interesting old bits is another nail in the coffin of a country with a bit of character and interest). It all smacks of nothing other than trying to run the railways at as low a cost as possible.

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The UK is just as corrupt. Luckily?!? we have enough red tape and regulations to point the finger at someone who signs the safety documents.

We just have a public inquiry which reports its findings 2 years after everybody has stopped caring.

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Thanks to an impulse airport bookshop purchase, I've recently finished Red for Danger, a satisfyingly gruesome history of railway accidents written in the mid-50s, covering the preceding century. The overwhelming impression you get of the Victorian period especially was that trains crashing, exploding and cremating their occupants was a more-or-less routine occurrence, and that as with all forms of mechanised transport, safety improvements were essentially a case of learning from trial and error. Given China's current state of economic development and without wanting to sound callous, one railway accident claiming 16 lives hardly strikes me as evidence of systemic failure.

I agree that one accident doesn't show systemic failure, however if the Chinese have cut corners we sadly can expect more of these types of accidents. Pure speculation here but what if the rails are to blame due to being incorrectly laid and poor quality and the thousands of miles of track have been laid with the same standard?

I was thinking what if the Chinese have just copied how to build these types of trains without understanding the science it's possible more of these types of accidents will happen.

That book sounds interesting I might buy it.

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I agree that one accident doesn't show systemic failure, however if the Chinese have cut corners we sadly can expect more of these types of accidents. Pure speculation here but what if the rails are to blame due to being incorrectly laid and poor quality and the thousands of miles of track have been laid with the same standard?

I was thinking what if the Chinese have just copied how to build these types of trains without understanding the science it's possible more of these types of accidents will happen.

That book sounds interesting I might buy it.

I blame the Triangs...

Red for Danger is a great book by the way.

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From what I understand, one train was struck by lightning which took out the power supply, then another train crashed into the back of it.

That would appear to indicate a failure with the signalling system, because the signals shouldn't have let that train run on a section of track where there was another non-moving train.

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jul/28/china-train-crash-signal-flaw

Design flaws in signal equipment and human error caused the high-speed train crash in China last weekend that killed at least 39 people, a railway official said.

The preliminary finding comes amid public anger about the government's handling of the accident near Wenzhou in Zhejiang province.

Premier Wen Jiabao, who arrived in Wenzhou on Thursday to check on the investigation and the condition of survivors, has called for a sweeping and transparent inquiry into the crash between two bullet trains, which also injured more than 190 people.

Six train cars derailed and four fell about 65 to 100ft from a viaduct Saturday night after one train crashed into the back of another train that had stalled after being hit by lightning.

An Lusheng, head of the Shanghai Railway Bureau, said there were design problems with the signal light equipment at the Wenzhou South Station and dispatchers did not send any warnings after the lightning strike.

This is the official explanation.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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