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Electrical Periodic Inspections

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Hi

I've been reading about periodic inspections (PIR) here on the Electrical Safety Council website.

They advise that a PIR should be done:

Other instances when a periodic inspection should be carried out are

When a property is being prepared to be let.

Before selling a property or when buying a previously occupied property.

In much the same way that a buyer would pay for a structural survey - or pay for various tradesman to view and report on the house - I thought the onus would be on the buyer to pay for the PIR.

I am mindful that even structural survey's usually advise getting someone qualified to check electrical - or plumbing - or whatever it may be. So again I thought this was suggesting putting the responsibility for arranging and paying for this additional inspections onto the buyer.

Or if buying a home is it reasonable to ask for the vendor to arrange and pay for a PIR?

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They advise that a PIR should be done:

Before selling a property or when buying a previously occupied property.

Or if buying a home is it reasonable to ask for the vendor to arrange and pay for a PIR?

It's reasonable to ask, especially in the current market, but that doesn't mean you'll get.

And you did see the second half of the sentence that caught your interest, right?

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It's reasonable to ask, especially in the current market, but that doesn't mean you'll get.

And you did see the second half of the sentence that caught your interest, right?

I did see the second half but not sure I comprehend what you are hinting at :)

Unless it is a newbuild - which it isn't - then the house will be previously occupied.

So how does that changes things?

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I did see the second half but not sure I comprehend what you are hinting at :)

Unless it is a newbuild - which it isn't - then the house will be previously occupied.

So how does that changes things?

Sorry - I might have read too much into the original post, perhaps even because it was the first half of that sentence that caught my eye.

Seems odd that anyone would pay for a a report when leaving their house, which is what that sentence suggests sellers do, and I thought that you had also picked up on. By all means go for it, and I hope you start a new trend so that when I come to buy a house vendors are already conducting these reports.

The only niggle remaining in the back of my head is that I am sure vendors could find a friendly electrician, pay an extra case of wine, and get a favourable report regardless of actual condition. If you are arranging the report, it is likely to either be realistic or to lean towards negativity to cover the assessor's back.

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Sorry - I might have read too much into the original post, perhaps even because it was the first half of that sentence that caught my eye.

Seems odd that anyone would pay for a a report when leaving their house, which is what that sentence suggests sellers do, and I thought that you had also picked up on. By all means go for it, and I hope you start a new trend so that when I come to buy a house vendors are already conducting these reports.

The only niggle remaining in the back of my head is that I am sure vendors could find a friendly electrician, pay an extra case of wine, and get a favourable report regardless of actual condition. If you are arranging the report, it is likely to either be realistic or to lean towards negativity to cover the assessor's back.

My thoughts were that whether I or the vendor paid for the PIR report then the comeback will be on the electrician should anything go wrong since they will be registered with NICEIC or other recognised organisation.

As it is I am leaning towards paying for the report and asking the vendors to pay for any work required.

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Doing a PIR requires all the cables to be disconnected at the consumer unit. A joint should only ever be made once (as it involves squashing the copper wire). Therefore post-PIR all the wires have to be shortened. (Or else the electrician is a cowboy.)

I would NEVER EVER allow a buyer to undertake a PIR on my property. Who pays for the rectification work if their spark messes up?

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Doing a PIR requires all the cables to be disconnected at the consumer unit.

No, you put the probes into the screw terminals of the MCB.

Also, it's an INSPECTION - the requirement for TESTING is I believe 10% initially with more if faults are found. For the very reason you state that disturbing an installation is likely to introduce new faults.

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No, you put the probes into the screw terminals of the MCB.

Also, it's an INSPECTION - the requirement for TESTING is I believe 10% initially with more if faults are found. For the very reason you state that disturbing an installation is likely to introduce new faults.

Well, If I were the vendor and a spark turned up to do a periodic for a buyer I would tell him that he is not to remove or disturb any outlet.

There goes your 10% and since it is my house it is my rules.

This pretty much limits the inspection to the consumer unit and a visual around the rooms, assuming ofc that I dont object to the power being turned off on any circuit......

Who pays? Is that a serious question? Whoever wants the report pays for it.

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Well, If I were the vendor and a spark turned up to do a periodic for a buyer I would tell him that he is not to remove or disturb any outlet.

There goes your 10% and since it is my house it is my rules.

This pretty much limits the inspection to the consumer unit and a visual around the rooms,

You'd be surprised how easy it (now) is to tell that an electrical circuit is installed incorrectly just by plugging things into the sockets and putting probes at the CU

tim

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Well, If I were the vendor and a spark turned up to do a periodic for a buyer I would tell him that he is not to remove or disturb any outlet.

There goes your 10% and since it is my house it is my rules.

This pretty much limits the inspection to the consumer unit and a visual around the rooms, assuming ofc that I dont object to the power being turned off on any circuit......

Who pays? Is that a serious question? Whoever wants the report pays for it.

If you want to pay for a sheet full of the word 'LIM' then good for you :lol:

As tim123 says, electrical testing does not require dismantling - inspection does. All the electrical tests are to check continuity of earth/ring circuits, insulation resistance, earth loop impedance, and RCD operation (But of course, you wouldn't want that either, so LIM again!

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If you want to pay for a sheet full of the word 'LIM' then good for you :lol:

As tim123 says, electrical testing does not require dismantling - inspection does. All the electrical tests are to check continuity of earth/ring circuits, insulation resistance, earth loop impedance, and RCD operation (But of course, you wouldn't want that either, so LIM again!

I wouldnt be paying for it the buyer would and it wouldnt bother me that he gets a page of results saying "lim" back.

A periodic inspection is testing and inspection.

I was pointing out that as a vendor you are unlikely to want anything found or any disturbance caused so refusing to allow any outlets to be touched or circuits to be turned off pretty much covers that.

The buyer may well be paying the spark to carry out an inspection but the house belongs to the vendor and what they say goes.

10% would be normal but if they dont want light switches or sockets opened because they have wall papered upto them and to disturb them would leave a worsened decor then that is all there is to it.

Can I remove light switches?

can I remove plug socket faces?

can I turn circuits off?

can I trip your ring to test the rcd?

can I undo a ceiling rose?

can I go into your loft?

Answer...NO......20 mins, all done, "lim" written everywhere.

Fee from the buyer......priceless.

Value of the report.......worthless :)

Edited by Number79

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Fee from the buyer......priceless.

Value of the report.......worthless :)

:lol::lol::lol:

It would say under the agreed limitations (Well, any spark without a fetish for lawsuits would fill it in) something like "Visual inspection without dismantling and electrical testing only"

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:lol::lol::lol:

It would say under the agreed limitations (Well, any spark without a fetish for lawsuits would fill it in) something like "Visual inspection without dismantling and electrical testing only"

Mine used to say...

"Visual inspection only, vendor states no outlets to be disturbed"

It is a difficult one. If a buyer is willing to pay for an electrical inspection, as recommended by the surveyor who isnt qualified, then it is still in the hands of the vendor. There was a time that an inspection was to be included in the homesellers pack which would have been a good idea imo but it was dropped like a sack of shit for obvious reasons.

Basically, buyers still cant get a full and honest report until they actually own the house. Buying houses is still no safer in this country than buying shit off feebay.

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I guess the buyer could refuse unless there was a thorough P.I.R. but then they'd need to understand the whole report rather than file it in a drawer for the next 20 years...

But yeah, agreed!

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I guess the buyer could refuse unless there was a thorough P.I.R. but then they'd need to understand the whole report rather than file it in a drawer for the next 20 years...

But yeah, agreed!

Chronx are you electrical? I just spotted a gap in the market

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  • 311 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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