Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
EmmaRoid

Natural Disaster Or Financial Disaster?

Recommended Posts

This is hyperbole and I've no substantial opinion either way but we were/are told that the banks needed to be bailed out otherwise it would have been the end of the world. We had no choice it must have been done whether we liked it or not. Then this year you see Japan, one of the most developed countries int he world, hit by a massive natural disaster with consequent lingering man made physical disaster and despite all that they have not reverted to being neanderthal cavemen.

Are we now saying that a digital financial disaster is worse than anything the natural world can throw at us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are long over due a mass killing bug which will wipe out millions of people world wide.

A natural disaster will dwarf what our financial king pins can do.

If yellowstone blows, the financial collapse will look insignificant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are long over due a mass killing bug WAR which will wipe out millions of people world wide.

In times of war a house is something TBTB will send your call up papers too or the invading army will take off you.

It's good to be a renter :lol:

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is hyperbole and I've no substantial opinion either way but we were/are told that the banks needed to be bailed out otherwise it would have been the end of the world. We had no choice it must have been done whether we liked it or not. Then this year you see Japan, one of the most developed countries int he world, hit by a massive natural disaster with consequent lingering man made physical disaster and despite all that they have not reverted to being neanderthal cavemen.

Are we now saying that a digital financial disaster is worse than anything the natural world can throw at us?

Huh? if all the money, digital and physical, disappeared tomorrow everything else would still be there, in exactly the same state.

As opposed to after hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanoes, floods........

Edited by chronyx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A man made disaster would be good for those of us practiced in the art of preparedness. Most people will die off within a relatively similar timeframe...all you need do is last a bit longer than them and the world will likely be depopulated 90%...cheap houses for all the survivors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A man made disaster would be good for those of us practiced in the art of preparedness. Most people will die off within a relatively similar timeframe...all you need do is last a bit longer than them and the world will likely be depopulated 90%...cheap houses for all the survivors.

Sounds like Yorkshire after the miner's strike - you can still get a 2 bed bungalow in Ryhill for £30,000.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-47885174.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I quite enjoy watching Doomsday Preppers I doubt there actually are any likely scenarios, either natural or man made, that would result in the complete destruction of civilization as we know it. The banks could have been allowed to fail, it absolutely wouldn't have been the end of the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, this thread brings back memories. How precious life seemed back then, when we only had a few days to live.

we've heard a lot about the possibility of failure of the financial system, but very little about how this would manifest itself and what it would mean for the man on the street. What do you think the real day-to-day implications of a systemic financial failure (whatever that actually means) would be? Is this tinned goods time or what? I mean, what would actually happen do you think if Wall st's bluff was called?

Good question. Simply put, a collapse of the financial system would mean no banking services whatsoever because there would be no banks. This would mean there would be: no trade finance so companies could not export, no bridging loans so companies could not carry stock, no mortgages, no student loans, no overdrafts. On the other side, savings would disappear and investment funds and pensions would be reduced to almost nothing if not wiped out. As international trade would effectively cease, there would be food shortages in countries like the UK which are dependent on imports and there would be shortages of all goods in all non-manufacturing countries. Whole sectors of the economy – including most of the service sector - would collapse resulting in unemployment which would make the Great Depression look like a cyclical dip. That is what is at risk here and that is why Congress must sign a plan similar to the TARP, angry as they are that they have to do so.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/87942-rtc-you-heard-it-here-first/?p=1340777

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hang on, isn't that a bungal ....brick shed in the alleyway between 2 houses ?

It might seem like nothing but a shed to you, but around here a shed is something you put on your allotment to put your tools in. This place even has somewhere to keep the coal indoors - that's posh for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are we now saying that a digital financial disaster is worse than anything the natural world can throw at us?

Not worse- but possibly comparable to many natural disasters. The financial system is the 'software' that makes our world run, so a global failure of the financial system would have very real consequences in terms of supply chains and energy security.

If money and credit fell over things could unravel very fast and be hard to put back together.

True the 'hardware' would still be in place in terms of natural resources ect- but even the most expensive hardware in existence is just a pile of junk without the software to run it.

The most amazing thing to me is that we have handed over control of this vital infrastructure to people who have every incentive to corrupt and damage it because their incentives are not aligned with it's well being but on the degree to which they can pervert and undermine it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I quite enjoy watching Doomsday Preppers I doubt there actually are any likely scenarios, either natural or man made, that would result in the complete destruction of civilization as we know it. The banks could have been allowed to fail, it absolutely wouldn't have been the end of the world.

What about Satanic State?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about Satanic State?

Surely Shaytanic State for the arabic? ;) We'll probably be in for another hot war at some point but they lack the firepower to completely obliterate us. Long term I would think Saudi is a bigger threat given much of this Wahhabism originates there and they do purportedly have access to the Pakistani nuclear program (which is still limited when you consider the combined firepower of the West and the number of targets we represent - America is pretty geographically vast for instance). We could potentially end up with US-EU-Iranian Allied forces ranged against a pseudo-Sunni extremist Axis. Whodathunkit. Thing is even in the (unlikely IMO) event of the IS situation eventually descending into an extreme/nuclear hot war it would be unlikely that those who survived it would be sent back to the stone ages. Were such a war to happen it would be horrific, but probably not the end of civilization (although certainly the end of some of us as individuals).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might seem like nothing but a shed to you, but around here a shed is something you put on your allotment to put your tools in. This place even has somewhere to keep the coal indoors - that's posh for you.

Agents Note

Please note that we have not been able to ascertain whether the first floor alterations comply with current building regulations. We strongly advise that prospective purchasers should make enquiries via their legal representation to confirm this.

I didn't think you are being serious.

My point was that it was not representative of low priced property in the area as it was dodgy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.