Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
interestrateripoff

Your Recycling Efforts Across Sheffield Make £500K For City Council

Recommended Posts

http://www.thestar.co.uk/community/green-scene/your_recycling_efforts_across_sheffield_make_500k_for_city_council_1_3604792

residents made Sheffield Council more than half a million pounds in the first year of new recycling collections, The Star can reveal today.

The council earned £577,131 from selling paper, card, glass, cans and plastic bottles saved by households across the city in their blue bins and boxes, Freedom of Information Act figures show.

The cash was made in the first 10 months of the scheme - which was launched in February 2010.

.......

But the £2.5 million bill for carrying out the collections has been criticised as too pricey.

So does this mean they actually mean it only cost £2m to collect the rubbish instead of £2.5?

However recovering over £.5m in 10 months is still impressive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.thestar.co.uk/community/green-scene/your_recycling_efforts_across_sheffield_make_500k_for_city_council_1_3604792

So does this mean they actually mean it only cost £2m to collect the rubbish instead of £2.5?

However recovering over £.5m in 10 months is still impressive.

No doubt the savings will be reflected in next year's council tax bill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.thestar.co.uk/community/green-scene/your_recycling_efforts_across_sheffield_make_500k_for_city_council_1_3604792

So does this mean they actually mean it only cost £2m to collect the rubbish instead of £2.5?

However recovering over £.5m in 10 months is still impressive.

I've been saying these to people for ages, councils surely make a lot of money from recyclables. Why do you think they have all those coloured bins, it's not for our benefit, it's for theirs.

If I owned a house (in my dreams) it would really annoy me having to take up a large amount of space with those stupid bins just so the council could profit. Can you opt out of the bins or do you HAVE to have them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Efficient management of waste, surely? If it was a private company doing this do you think you would get any money back from them either?

Oh, and £2million / 10 = £200,000 a month which doesn't sound too much for a big (very hilly) city at all. How big is the Chief Exec's pension pot?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So much for those disagreeing with me when I said that I expect a reduction in council tax due to having to faff around with several bins, most of it not getting taking away weekly etc. because the council just have to provide a worse service that will cost them more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been saying these to people for ages, councils surely make a lot of money from recyclables. Why do you think they have all those coloured bins, it's not for our benefit, it's for theirs.

If I owned a house (in my dreams) it would really annoy me having to take up a large amount of space with those stupid bins just so the council could profit. Can you opt out of the bins or do you HAVE to have them?

They do take up space, which is obviously a pain if you're short of it, but apart from that to me it's really no big deal to sort stuff. And if it saves the council money and reduces landfill, I don't see the problem. Can't understand why people make such a thing of it.

Unless they actually like having bins full of stinking food waste, un-rinsed cans and milk bottles, all going to landfill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do take up space, which is obviously a pain if you're short of it, but apart from that to me it's really no big deal to sort stuff. And if it saves the council money and reduces landfill, I don't see the problem. Can't understand why people make such a thing of it.

Unless they actually like having bins full of stinking food waste, un-rinsed cans and milk bottles, all going to landfill.

I can see it's a good thing, but generally I have seen that people only recycle if they can be bothered. Whether they have specific bins or not. My parents for instance are diligent, but they were before they had any assortment of coloured bins. On the other hand, being a renter I have seen flat mates who really couldn't give a sh*t and just dump all waste into one bin - then sitting their for two weeks "full of stinking food waste, un-rinsed cans and milk bottles, all going to landfill."

Recycling is very important and what the councils have done is a solution, good or bad. But I would like to know if their agenda is really for a greener community?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A question for the anti recycling brigade - whats your alternative given that landfill space is fast running out in the UK and no one seems to want an incinerator near them, unsurprisingly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A question for the anti recycling brigade - whats your alternative given that landfill space is fast running out in the UK and no one seems to want an incinerator near them, unsurprisingly?

Easy, just dump it at sea. Preferably near the coast of France.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see it's a good thing, but generally I have seen that people only recycle if they can be bothered. Whether they have specific bins or not. My parents for instance are diligent, but they were before they had any assortment of coloured bins. On the other hand, being a renter I have seen flat mates who really couldn't give a sh*t and just dump all waste into one bin - then sitting their for two weeks "full of stinking food waste, un-rinsed cans and milk bottles, all going to landfill."

Recycling is very important and what the councils have done is a solution, good or bad. But I would like to know if their agenda is really for a greener community?

Some will only do it if forced, or if they think they'll be fined if they don't. Acquaintance of mine refused on stroppy principle until she was more or less forced. Had plenty of space for bins, just wouldn't do it. ('Why should I?')

But then she (serious sales shopaholic) was also in the habit of taking piles of barely-worn clothes to the tip, until she found out that a charity shop was offering a £5 voucher if you took anything from M&S.

After which she'd carefully sort her vast piles of barely-worn to include one M&S item per trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They haven't added the highest value recyclable in the figure. Clothing. Our small Belfast council recently tendered this out. The contract was worth 600K per year. It’s half the size of Sheffield. No reduction in rates for us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They haven't added the highest value recyclable in the figure. Clothing. Our small Belfast council recently tendered this out. The contract was worth 600K per year. It’s half the size of Sheffield. No reduction in rates for us.

There are clothes recycling shops here that pay £5 for 5kg...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are clothes recycling shops here that pay £5 for 5kg...

We have them too but any clothing placed in the "charity banks" in the council amenity sites makes the council around £6.00 per kilo. None of the clothing goes to charity obviously. They probably get a set amount (pennies) and the council get £600K. People think it goes to good causes. I know the same thing happens throughout England.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some will only do it if forced, or if they think they'll be fined if they don't. Acquaintance of mine refused on stroppy principle until she was more or less forced. Had plenty of space for bins, just wouldn't do it. ('Why should I?')

But then she (serious sales shopaholic) was also in the habit of taking piles of barely-worn clothes to the tip, until she found out that a charity shop was offering a £5 voucher if you took anything from M&S.

After which she'd carefully sort her vast piles of barely-worn to include one M&S item per trip.

:) Incentive is a powerful thing, wouldn't it be nice if the council offered a reduction in your council tax if you were a proficient recycler. Guarantee there wouldn't be many people who "can't be bothered" or had a stropppy "why should I?" attitude, also rewards the sensible ones who have always recycled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way I read the numbers they had revenues of £500,000 pounds.. and expenses of £2,500,000 from their recycling scheme.

It doesn't sound like a great business to me. But I'm sure there will be generous bonuses to the executives for achieving a 'gross profit' of £500,000 pounds.

Edited by aa3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I owned a house (in my dreams) it would really annoy me having to take up a large amount of space with those stupid bins just so the council could profit. Can you opt out of the bins or do you HAVE to have them?

The mind truly boggles at this mentality :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A question for the anti recycling brigade - whats your alternative given that landfill space is fast running out in the UK and no one seems to want an incinerator near them, unsurprisingly?

The waste should be dealt with at the point of creation, the manufacturers and shops that over package should be taxed heavily to pay for the waste they create. If a product needs to be packaged then they should be required to use environmentally friendly packaging, or pay to cover the environmental costs currently pushed onto society for dealing with the waste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The mind truly boggles at this mentality :blink:

What mentality? I have always recycled and still do, don't need 4 massive bins in the front garden to recycle. Second sentence was a question, purely out of curiosity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A question for the anti recycling brigade - whats your alternative given that landfill space is fast running out in the UK and no one seems to want an incinerator near them, unsurprisingly?

Answer, send it to China.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Large metropolitan area, built on seven (big) hills. Population 547,000, cost £2.5M, this works out at £5 a head per year. Sounds like outstanding value to me.

Most of the recycling income comes from when they empty my bottle bin, I'm making the city a fortune.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The waste should be dealt with at the point of creation, the manufacturers and shops that over package should be taxed heavily to pay for the waste they create. If a product needs to be packaged then they should be required to use environmentally friendly packaging, or pay to cover the environmental costs currently pushed onto society for dealing with the waste.

I agree that reduction (and reuse) at source is preferable to recycling but inevitably there will be some packaging to protect the goods inside.

I don't reallyknow what the definition of environmentally friendly packaging is?

If it biodegrades then it really needs to go for composting as in the landfill it will produce lots of methane

If its glass it can be reused however these schemes have fallen out of favour so recycling is more likely. Furthermore glass weighs a lot so increases transport costs and is relatively energy intensive when it comes to recycling

Plastic - doesnt biodegrade and needs to be sorted and clean if it is going to be recycled. Can be burnt but then we are back to the old incinerator problem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 315 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.