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Creative Estate Agents Are Becoming Woodland Agents

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BBC News are running a piece about buying woodland instead of property.

Agents say there's money to be made.

Woodland agent "Interest rates are very very low, people are making no money, and people have seen that buying land has been has been a good way of putting their money into something that has increased in value".

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BBC News are running a piece about buying woodland instead of property.

Agents say there's money to be made.

Woodland agent "Interest rates are very very low, people are making no money, and people have seen that buying land has been has been a good way of putting their money into something that has increased in value".

Well there is land for sale on the outskirts of my town which will surely be granted planning permission in the long term future and it's been for sale for nearly two years. Not just one plot either there's a few of them. I think it's something to do with the fact it's massively over priced and falling in value.

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BBC News are running a piece about buying woodland instead of property.

Agents say there's money to be made.

Woodland agent "Interest rates are very very low, people are making no money, and people have seen that buying land has been has been a good way of putting their money into something that has increased in value".

Very generous tax breaks for woodland. Introduced during WW1 to encourage production of props for coal mines. The shortage must still exist.

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BBC News are running a piece about buying woodland instead of property.

Agents say there's money to be made.

Woodland agent "Interest rates are very very low, people are making no money, and people have seen that buying land has been has been a good way of putting their money into something that has increased in value".

This is a story of desperation. Good.

There is absolutely nothing you can do with Woodland. The normal buyer would be some sort of Conservationist. This will be forgotten as quickly as it arose.

Edited by Milton

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There is absolutely nothing you can do with Woodland. This will be forgotten as quickly as it arose. And it is a symptom of desperation. Good.

Not necessarily, but generally true - just an extension of more than a decade of ignorant bubble blowing policies that have (and continue) to wreck any balance in the country's economy.

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Yep. I'm right. Cynically targetting conservationists. :lol:

http://www.woodlands.co.uk/

It's not about actual conservationists, it's about middle class families who can't afford a country cottage and fancy feeling like landowners and having some land in which to camp, make campfires and their kids can climb trees. (Because if you go to a normal campsite there will be noise and other people and you won't be allowed a fire.) There was a phase a few years ago when the Sunday papers were full of advertorial type features on it.

The company approaches farmers who have a bit of woodland on their land and works out a plan to parcel it up (giving each little square a cutesy name) and sell it for £££. Eg £60k for a bit of wood that would have been worth £12k at normal prices.

Proper conservationists don't like it because it means that bits of the wood belong to too many different people and it's harder to ensure it's managed properly.

If anyone thinks it'll be a good investment at those prices they're an idiot.

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The company approaches farmers who have a bit of woodland on their land and works out a plan to parcel it up (giving each little square a cutesy name) and sell it for £££. Eg £60k for a bit of wood that would have been worth £12k at normal prices.

Quite. Proper woodland is commercially managed, planted, felled and used. It costs a few grand an acre, tops. You need lots of it to make it commercially viable, 100 acres is about the minimum, unless you are in a forestry area and machinery can be brought in easily.

Buying 6 acres for £60K is bonkers - but people do it because they have a small garden and think they would like a bigger one. They soon realise that managing 6 acres to look twee is bloody hard work, and anything they leave on site will be nicked or vandalised.

Fencing is another liability. Farmers get rid of a useless strip of land and pass the fencing obligations onto it. The new owner then has to repair the stock fences whenever the farmer says do (expensive).

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It's not about actual conservationists, it's about middle class families who can't afford a country cottage and fancy feeling like landowners and having some land in which to camp, make campfires and their kids can climb trees. (Because if you go to a normal campsite there will be noise and other people and you won't be allowed a fire.)

Whatever the reason they buy the land, they do so knowing that it has nearly 0% chance of a return as an investment.

Which makes them a proponent, or advocate of conservation.

[i wondered a few years back if you could buy a woodland in a nice location, and use it as a commercial campsite. No.

Or raise free Range Turkeys in the woods? No.

Woodland prices have gone through the roof since then. Same as most other types of land. I would suggest it has peaked]

Edited by Milton

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This is a story of desperation. Good.

There is absolutely nothing you can do with Woodland. The normal buyer would be some sort of Conservationist. This will be forgotten as quickly as it arose.

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This is a story of desperation. Good.

There is absolutely nothing you can do with Woodland. The normal buyer would be some sort of Conservationist. This will be forgotten as quickly as it arose.

I disagree buy some woodland in a nice coastal area for the price of a small car then camp on it, within permitted development rights for 28 days a year ie during the expensive school holidays for the next few generations,it also supplies all your fuel for a wood burner for life, plus the pleasure of ownership all for about 6 grand an acre. also if prices do go up sell half for what you paid and you get whats left for free.Good Deal.

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They are flogging this:

http://www.woodlands.co.uk/buying-a-wood/west-and-south-wales/coed-onnen-ash-tree-wood/

Over which many thousands of people probably walk, and walk through, each week. I had always assumed it was owned by the National Trust. Certainly, there is a very well established right of way.

What could you do with such a wood? It is in a conservation area so building is out.

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I disagree

Please yourself.

I'll pop down the road, and offer a local farmer, a fiver a night to camp on his land with the same view.

If I see you, I'll wave at you, on your 50k 8acre campsite though. :D

Of Interest:

The Forestry Commission has scrapped the right, enshrined in the "Great Charter" at Runneymede in 1215, in order to stop people picking firewood from woodland.

[im actually not against the idea. Personally I think the destruction of our Forests over thousands of years, is a real tragedy. And we are much poorer for it. I envy any country who has real wilderness. People who buy/maintain woodlands for eco/moral reasons, are worthy of respect.]

To make a generalisation, In my experience, the people who acquire woodlands, measure success by 'what they have learned to do without' They have adopted a discipline. And are just disinterested in 'keeping up with the Jones's'

I would prefer more of that that to the consumer based society we are, an dim sure it would engender a better sense of community. Although, if the reasons for 'learning to live without' or austerity, are because of blatant government sponsored bank theft, 'they' can kiss my ****.

Edited by Milton

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Quite. Proper woodland is commercially managed, planted, felled and used. It costs a few grand an acre, tops. You need lots of it to make it commercially viable, 100 acres is about the minimum, unless you are in a forestry area and machinery can be brought in easily.

Buying 6 acres for £60K is bonkers - but people do it because they have a small garden and think they would like a bigger one. They soon realise that managing 6 acres to look twee is bloody hard work, and anything they leave on site will be nicked or vandalised.

Fencing is another liability. Farmers get rid of a useless strip of land and pass the fencing obligations onto it. The new owner then has to repair the stock fences whenever the farmer says do (expensive).

Yes it is true. Woodland has to be managed regularly, otherwise your woodland turns into a miserable dark area, with no layers of vegetation, little wildlife and the continual high risk of trees blowing over or limbs falling over (which is a massive issue of there is public access near by) presents itself.

Woodland in the UK has been managed for thousands of years, but even before that herds of roaming cattle and mammals inhibited some tree growth through grazing, tree de-barking and compaction allowing pockets of light to penetrate the canopy. Nowdays with no wild cattle and no woodsmen woodland is going into a declining state.

To buy woodland as an "investment" is a stupid idea, and is just another example of a ponzi scheme. However buying it to store your wealth is a good idea. But only if you can buy it competitively priced and can afford the time to manage it from time-to-time. Because without management it will devalue and its aesthetics will deteriorate.

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I disagree buy some woodland in a nice coastal area for the price of a small car then camp on it, within permitted development rights for 28 days a year ie during the expensive school holidays for the next few generations,it also supplies all your fuel for a wood burner for life, plus the pleasure of ownership all for about 6 grand an acre. also if prices do go up sell half for what you paid and you get whats left for free.Good Deal.

I think that makes perfect sense if you can buy it at a reasonable price. If you pay bubble prices it's a different kettle of fish.

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I disagree buy some woodland in a nice coastal area for the price of a small car then camp on it, within permitted development rights for 28 days a year ie during the expensive school holidays for the next few generations,it also supplies all your fuel for a wood burner for life, plus the pleasure of ownership all for about 6 grand an acre. also if prices do go up sell half for what you paid and you get whats left for free.Good Deal.

Woodland in a nice coastal area for 6 grand an acre? Are you sure?

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<br />I disagree buy some woodland in a nice coastal area for the price of a small car then camp on it, within permitted development rights for 28 days a year ie during the expensive school holidays for the next few generations,it also supplies all your fuel for a wood burner for life, plus the pleasure of ownership all for about 6 grand an acre. also if prices do go up sell half for what you paid and you get whats left for free.Good Deal.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

And what if someone else also has the same idea, yet doesnt fancy parting with £60k for the privilege, and instead fancies camping in your woodland? The police can't even evict 'squatters' that decide to move into your house when you're out walking the dog, what do you think their reaction would be to someone camping in your woodland? <_<

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Woodland in a nice coastal area for 6 grand an acre? Are you sure?

It is there if you search ,Cornwall Devon Dorset maybe a mile or two inland ,see woodland UK. last year maybe 4 or 5 grand an acre now 6 to 8 grand and acre depends on access rights of way river frontage sports rights covernats ect

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<br /><br /><br />

And what if someone else also has the same idea, yet doesnt fancy parting with £60k for the privilege, and instead fancies camping in your woodland? The police can't even evict 'squatters' that decide to move into your house when you're out walking the dog, what do you think their reaction would be to someone camping in your woodland? <_<

Welcome them ,hope they stay join them if there are enough

of you and say you are travelers planners are shit scared of doing any enforcement after 4 years get residential rights.

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The future of EA's...

Why did he stop? That's what Bumpers were made for.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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