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Guest_ringledman_*

Is Freelance Less Stress Than Perm?

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As the title says.

Freelance is it a breath of fresh air? Of course there's the issues of sorting out your tax, finding roles, etc.

However I'm thinking of the day to day role. Do you get far less politics to deal with, less need to do that little extra for the firm, less evening emails, etc?

A happier work / life balance?

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However I'm thinking of the day to day role. Do you get far less politics to deal with, less need to do that little extra for the firm, less evening emails, etc?

I tend to get treated more respectfully as a freelancer.

However, all the little jobs that used to go on my time-sheet as "admin" still need doing and now, I don't get paid for them.

I'm currently quite stressed due to a surfeit of work. Before I could just leave it all behind me at 5:00 PM.

Overall I'm much happier as a freelancer but there are down sides.

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I tend to get treated more respectfully as a freelancer.

However, all the little jobs that used to go on my time-sheet as "admin" still need doing and now, I don't get paid for them.

I'm currently quite stressed due to a surfeit of work. Before I could just leave it all behind me at 5:00 PM.

Overall I'm much happier as a freelancer but there are down sides.

Agree with that.

I was self employed but did work full time for a company for nearly two years when we moved down here - wanted to do something a bit different - and I did manage to last two years.

The single biggest issue with that company and with others perhaps is the dreaded "General Admin".

When I started there, about 30% of the time recorded was "General Admin". But I'd already got wise to what that entails. Most if it is not general admin at all. It is project management and support.

So I never actually entered "General Admin" on the time sheets. There isn't really such a thing - about the only thing that qualifies is.... filling in the time sheet.

Which then created a bit of a stir and progressively the others' timesheets moved towards "Project Management" when people were told you had to be more specific.

Which then indicated to that company that for contract X which was say £10k - the actual income was £10k but the value of what was supplied was £13k. The other £3k had simply been vanishing for years.

The basis for my billing is time, not deliverables.

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I've only ever been a permie but these days I'm looking more and more with envy at becoming a contractor. A few years back:

Contractors = higher pay, longer hours

Permies = Lower pay, better work life balance

Now though I think the permies have pretty much lost all advantages as working hours have increased at my place to contractor levels, yet pay remains the same. I'm too busy to make the transition at the moment with a wedding in a months time but it is a thought that has been refusing to go away.

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As I say to everyone - if the thought of having zero income for 6 months does not bother you - do it. If not - stick to permanent.

Although we know there is no such thing as fully 'permanent' these days. You will still get a few months to sort something out and possibly a nice wedge to see you on your way.

In the contractor/freelancing World it can be 'Don't need you tomorrow - see ya'

And that is it. Personally that doesn't bother me - however for many it would.

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One piece of advice. If you go contracting, use the Umbrella company to pay your wages initially, even though you will pay less tax by setting up your own limited company. The reason is, in the current climate it's all too easy to be out of contract for 6 months or more. If the brolly isn't paying, you can then sign on and get the various benefits (jobseekers allowance hb, ct etc).. It also means you don't have to jump at a silly job rate because you're deseperate. A shade more difficult if you have a limited company - you may not be entitled to jobseekers, and may have to wind up your company if in still waters (if I recall correctly).

Of course if you get a long spell of contracting you can build up a fighting fund and at that point best to form your limited company and thus pay less tax.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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