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geezer466

Eurozone Collapsing

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With everyone's attention on the big cheeses in the Commons select committees have we forgotten about our bread and butter?

Spain has had to pay higher interest rates to borrow 4.45bn euros ($6.32bn, £3.9bn) on the financial markets.

The Eurozone bad news is coming thick and fast now... Contagion is assured Bailout is futile!!

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I'm getting deja vu from that week in 2008 when day after day there was increasingly bad news about the banks' exposure to the subprime crisis and a sense of 'how is this ever going to end without a financial meltdown'. Then, BOOM!

As then, there doesn't seem to be the possibility of just one spark lighting the fire now, but instead it could come from a range of countries - Greece, Spain, Ireland and Italy to name those competing for the moment.

I do not consider myself the TFH type, but I think we have definitely passed a tipping point and maybe facing a very serious situation in the immediate future.

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I'm getting deja vu from that week in 2008 when day after day there was increasingly bad news about the banks' exposure to the subprime crisis and a sense of 'how is this ever going to end without a financial meltdown'. Then, BOOM!

As then, there doesn't seem to be the possibility of just one spark lighting the fire now, but instead it could come from a range of countries - Greece, Spain, Ireland and Italy to name those competing for the moment.

I do not consider myself the TFH type, but I think we have definitely passed a tipping point and maybe facing a very serious situation in the immediate future.

look for problems in the real world, the financial system and the traders are more or less a closed loop - but the movement of real goods can't be finagled.

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I'm getting deja vu from that week in 2008 when day after day there was increasingly bad news about the banks' exposure to the subprime crisis and a sense of 'how is this ever going to end without a financial meltdown'. Then, BOOM!

As then, there doesn't seem to be the possibility of just one spark lighting the fire now, but instead it could come from a range of countries - Greece, Spain, Ireland and Italy to name those competing for the moment.

I do not consider myself the TFH type, but I think we have definitely passed a tipping point and maybe facing a very serious situation in the immediate future.

This time we have an even bigger problem as the good fairy godmother of the taxpayer can't bailout the taxpayer.

We have reached the end game, if they print they destroy the currency if they don't they destroy the ponzi economy they have created.

Reality it appears is about to catch up with the system.

The game now it not to be the country that triggers the collapse as we'll be fed endless crap about how it was X's fault and if X had just kept paying none of this would have happened. Rather than everyone is screwed.

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look for problems in the real world, the financial system and the traders are more or less a closed loop - but the movement of real goods can't be finagled.

The TED spread and the Baltic Dry Index were the leper's bells last time. I see the latter has just had a 6 month conniption...

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Try CharlesNenner.com.

Only just found him on youtube last night, he deals in super cycles, he thinks we are due a war at the end of 2012 / beginning of 2013, he sees the Eurozone breaking into North and South.

And he also sees the DOW going to 5000 in the next three years!

Check him out.

we are already at war in three countries, how many does it take to be a world war! we are in world war three....tptb just don't want to call it that as it would frighten the public.

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we are already at war in three countries, how many does it take to be a world war! we are in world war three....tptb just don't want to call it that as it would frighten the public.

We are just having lots of little ones.

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look for problems in the real world, the financial system and the traders are more or less a closed loop - but the movement of real goods can't be finagled.

Yes, lower travelled miles, more empty shops, more inflation, seemingly further devalued sterling, worse trade deficit, even though the eurozone has its own problems.

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But this time round, 2008 is still fresh in everyones' minds. There is still massive anger over the bankers bailouts and their continuing huge financial rewards at the taxpayers expense.

So can it be allowed to happen again? The only way they can get away with it this time is if there are some consequences surely ?

Inspector Knacker is collar feeling at the least excuse presently, let's hope this enthusiasm for making arrests continues into the forthcoming financial meltdown.

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we are already at war in three countries, how many does it take to be a world war! we are in world war three....tptb just don't want to call it that as it would frighten the public.

I can't help but guess you just might not have been around during the last two.. they were quite different ;)

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But this time round, 2008 is still fresh in everyones' minds. There is still massive anger over the bankers bailouts and their continuing huge financial rewards at the taxpayers expense.

So can it be allowed to happen again? The only way they can get away with it this time is if there are some consequences surely ?

Inspector Knacker is collar feeling at the least excuse presently, let's hope this enthusiasm for making arrests continues into the forthcoming financial meltdown.

My gut feeling is yes.. except this time they already have their finger poised over the print button.

Last time it sort of worked.. I just hope they are not complacent in their expectation that it's now a sure-fire solution with no unintended consequences.

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But this time round, 2008 is still fresh in everyones' minds. There is still massive anger over the bankers bailouts and their continuing huge financial rewards at the taxpayers expense.

So can it be allowed to happen again? The only way they can get away with it this time is if there are some consequences surely ?

Inspector Knacker is collar feeling at the least excuse presently, let's hope this enthusiasm for making arrests continues into the forthcoming financial meltdown.

Who bails out the taxpayer?

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My gut feeling is yes.. except this time they already have their finger poised over the print button.

Last time it sort of worked.. I just hope they are not complacent in their expectation that it's now a sure-fire solution with no unintended consequences.

My guess is that it will be a full system reset.

The printing will be presented as having (and to a great extent actually have) a narrow focus on recapitalisation, and be introduced in tandem with banking reform to limit the ability of the debtsters to transform capital into leveraged geared credit money.

That is to say; they will try to take us back to the 1970's, but with current nominal prices*.

Then they can start the cycle again.

*They won't be current nominal prices - but the order of magnitude might be similar.

Edited by Timm

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But this time round, 2008 is still fresh in everyones' minds. There is still massive anger over the bankers bailouts and their continuing huge financial rewards at the taxpayers expense.

So can it be allowed to happen again? The only way they can get away with it this time is if there are some consequences surely ?

Inspector Knacker is collar feeling at the least excuse presently, let's hope this enthusiasm for making arrests continues into the forthcoming financial meltdown.

After the run on Northern Rock, Mervyn King successfully argued that the BOE should be able to prop up failing banks in private without the need to disclose that to the public.

That's how.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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