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Rising Motoring Costs Drive 1.3 Million Brits Off The Road


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WVM is getting to work smarter. I know I have been using Shiply a lot more than I used to simply do it myself

For instance.... South Coast to Worcestershire with a 3 piece suite..... 250 miles or so. Call it 25mpg in a decent sized van. 10 gallons. £60. Plus getting to the hire place, plus renting the van (£40 a day minimum, usually they try nearer £70). So £100 at the very least, plus a good half a day of my weekend.

Shiply - £70 including all fees. [For those that haven't used it, it's like a reverse Ebay, you put up the job, couriers price it up and you take the one you want - I tend not to take the one that undercuts the next lowest by a quid.... because all he is doing is trying to undercut.... the courier's logic is that they get to collect extra cash for doing a little bit out of their way, but more than enough to offset their time and fuel, when otherwise they'd be running empty).

As for repairs (previous page) - yes, bumpers are designed to deform, and given the C1/107/Aygo is basically French and designed for driving in French towns - read urban warfare, then it WILL have deformable bumpers. BUT, for something more serious, cars now are designed to deform their main structure to absorb impact, this actually causes a lot MORE damage than it used to, and gets plenty of cars written off where they may not have been before ....

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And a less democratic society in which only the rich and the political class can enjoy the convenience of private travel while the less well off are forced into overcrowded and unreliable public transport.

That's what we've had historically, as all but the socially excluded[1] had access to cars.

Encourage the middle classes to use public transport and it improves radically: they demand it!

[1] the poor, the infirm, and the young.

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Depends how you look at it. These days, if you don't have a car, life is very difficult.

Really?

I don't find it very difficult. Getting rid of my last car was a blessed relief.

But then I only live in West Devon, the most rural area in England, and one of the hilliest.

[edit to add] whoops! I see Durch posted much the same already B)

Edited by porca misèria
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its a mystery why insurance has soared..

If motorists paid as much per death and injury they cause as the rail industry does after some high-profile crashes, your premium would exceed the cost of a new car.

(that'll be a major reason rail travel costs)

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How long before we get the tesco pick-up service. ;)

We've had that for as long as I can remember. Every Tuesday and Friday.

Haven't used it since the day I got on, only to find they'd switched from an ancient and tatty double-decker to a coach, and the driver was playing some ghastly noise at us over the radio. In fact that very day I got off after just a mile or so, and did my shopping elsewhere.

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Really?

I don't find it very difficult. Getting rid of my last car was a blessed relief.

But then I only live in West Devon, the most rural area in England, and one of the hilliest.

[edit to add] whoops! I see Durch posted much the same already B)

Hills don't scare me, merely the logistics of trying to get young children to the right place at the right time, especially if they play football. I had no problem doing without a car before kids.

Edit: Of course, if transport was more expensive, we'd organise a bus for the football team and children would have their parties at home instead of at some distant adventure playground.

Edited by snowflux
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If motorists paid as much per death and injury they cause as the rail industry does after some high-profile crashes, your premium would exceed the cost of a new car.

(that'll be a major reason rail travel costs)

Not saying you're wrong because I don't understand the subject, but how does the private car insurance injury manage to insulate itself from medical bills, damages claims, etc? I thought your insurer was liable for all costs?

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Strange then, that I hear of reports that the insurance industry is actively encouraging this behaviour: http://money-watch.co.uk/8242/insurance-firms-accused-of-encouraging-claims

I had a shunt last winter, I'm still getting txts stating my entitlement to compensation.... I wonder where my details came from?

Guardian - Insurance Scandal

Straw, who is still the MP for Blackburn, says that insurers have been trading their customers' personal details, in the knowledge that this has contributed to a dramatic rise in claims. The scandal came to light as a result of investigations by Straw following complaints from constituents. He recently confronted two big insurers, which admitted they were selling personal data to claims companies – the type of companies that advertise their services on daytime TV promising a big payout if you were involved in an accident.

However, news that this has been happening has long been an open secret in the insurance industry. The reason it's been happening is simple: money.

Last year, UK car insurers collectively lost more than £2bn despite pushing through some of the highest price increases for new business ever seen. And it happens like this. Facing an end of year balance sheet that shows an insurer paid out more in claims than it took in premiums, some bright executive decides to sell their claims data on to a third-party company. The money received – which could be as much as £1,000 a customer – can be enough to put the firm back in the black, for that year at least.

What was good for one firm was quickly copied by rivals. Before long, the claims started to pour in. Unscrupulous buyers began exploiting lax rules on proving "whiplash" injuries to drive a sharp increase in claims and payouts. Armed with this information, it comes as no surprise that the cost of personal injury claims has doubled over the last 10 years – from £7bn to £14bn. This is in spite of a fall in the number of road accidents involving personal injury. What's even more extraordinary is the fact that we have all been paying for this collective madness. The latest AA British Insurance Premium Index shows the average premium for an comprehensive car insurance policy is now 40% higher than a year ago.

The only question is: what should be done? Straw is right when he describes it as a "racket" – and nothing short of a complete overhaul of the industry and the way it manages its data is long overdue. Instead of trying to defend this mess, the Association of British Insurers (ABI) needs to summon the industry to a summit to find a way to drive out this pernicious practice. Those firms that won't sign up to a deal should be named and shamed.

However, they also need help. The ABI is right when it says that it is not just insurers that are trading in this data. Policemen, health workers and others have also been caught selling on data after attending crashes/dealing with victims, and the information commissioner needs to look at this whole area. Should it be possible for an ambulance man to sell on details of the person he picked up earlier that day? I would venture not.

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Hills don't scare me, merely the logistics of trying to get young children to the right place at the right time, especially if they play football. I had no problem doing without a car before kids.

Edit: Of course, if transport was more expensive, we'd organise a bus for the football team and children would have their parties at home instead of at some distant adventure playground.

Yes, it's the whole 2-kids-and-both-parents-working that makes cars indispensable.

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The ones I am thinking about are in the South West....the thing with it is 'if you don't use it you lose it', when transport costs start eroding further into disposable incomes and people start to let go up of the car....many will become dependent on schemes like this, at the moment we have choices....all I would say don't diss it until you have tried it....change is not always bad......you can have a good natter and catch up with all the community news....better than reading the sun.

How long before we get the tesco pick-up service. ;)

tesco bus

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCAQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tesco.com%2Fstorelocator%2Fbus%2F3181.pdf&rct=j&q=tesco%20bus&ei=rIolTqSvNorMhAe-38T-CQ&usg=AFQjCNFO2cByzh1jGVuDFGHh_bhAOHeEww&sig2=bF2SHNGTWMMo1R91Ur71EQ&cad=rja

I think asda do one too

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If they are old enough to run and kick a football, they are old enough to walk to the bloody field!!!!

Apart from when the only football pitch is 7 miles away cos the houses are filled by second home owners who have destroyed local amenties

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If they are old enough to run and kick a football, they are old enough to walk to the bloody field!!!!

Not if they're playing away at a club 15 miles away!

Edit: The general point I'm trying to make is that you are generally expected to have a car in order to participate in society, particularly if you have kids. Events are organised on the assumption that everyone has access to private transport. Of course, if private transport were more expensive, this wouldn't be the case. It's something of a chicken-and-egg situation.

Edited by snowflux
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The problem is not the cost of transport. It's the cost of the ego boost that people expect with it.

Running a small petrol/diesel is cheaper than it was 10 years ago, both in terms of MPG and stealership costs.

It's just people expect air con, electric windows, huge name bagde etc etc. If we went back to cars being transportation, things are not any more expensive.

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Not saying you're wrong because I don't understand the subject, but how does the private car insurance injury manage to insulate itself from medical bills, damages claims, etc? I thought your insurer was liable for all costs?

It doesn't.

But road traffic victims are rarely compensated more than actual costs, which may not even cover a decent funeral. If you're crippled for life, you're not going to be compensated for loss of hypothetical career.

Rather more importantly, you don't see things like a big public inquiry, near-closure of the whole road network and billions poured into new safety measures if half a dozen people get killed, as has happened to the railways.

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It doesn't.

But road traffic victims are rarely compensated more than actual costs, which may not even cover a decent funeral. If you're crippled for life, you're not going to be compensated for loss of hypothetical career.

Rather more importantly, you don't see things like a big public inquiry, near-closure of the whole road network and billions poured into new safety measures if half a dozen people get killed, as has happened to the railways.

So they can't sue for loss of earnings? If that's the case then you're right, trains aren't competing on a level playing field.

Perhaps the reason there is no public enquiry and other financially burdensome repercussions, is that car accidents are caused by individual participants and don't pose any 'systemic risk' to other drivers. With the trains you've got collective responsibility of the state which struggles to reconcile its responsibilities and the inherent risks to its citizens. It doesn't seem to be able to distribute its risk correctly throughout the system, at least in a way that's acceptable to the participants, like driving does.

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Not if they're playing away at a club 15 miles away!

Edit: The general point I'm trying to make is that you are generally expected to have a car in order to participate in society, particularly if you have kids. Events are organised on the assumption that everyone has access to private transport. Of course, if private transport were more expensive, this wouldn't be the case. It's something of a chicken-and-egg situation.

Believe it or not, I do understand.

But my statement remains true, you know it. And by continuing to participate in these stupid activities miles away you are, by hook or by crook, contributing to your own pressure cooker.

Give kids a stick and some string, gravel if they're lucky. No need for complicated stuff. ;)

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I'm going to Newquay this weekend with a friend. I wouldn't go because of the high costs of travel, but this is a special occasion, so I'm going. Options are Car, Coach, Train and Air. Lets see how it stacked up:

Air:

£220 x2 return (£440). Duration 1.5 hours. And that's before I've paid for transport to and from both airports. No. Poor value.

Train:

£90 x2 return (£180). Duration 4.5 hours. No. Poor value.

Coach:

£60 x2 return (£120). Duration 6 hours. No. Poor value.

Car:

£74 fuel. Expensive Parking approx £26. Total £100 / 2 (£50). Duration 4.5 hours. Yes. Good value.

It's still more economical to drive in cases where you have to travel. Otherwise don't travel.

I'll continue to drive as long as this is the case.

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I'm going to Newquay this weekend with a friend. I wouldn't go because of the high costs of travel, but this is a special occasion, so I'm going. Options are Car, Coach, Train and Air. Lets see how it stacked up:

Air:

£220 x2 return (£440). Duration 1.5 hours. And that's before I've paid for transport to and from both airports. No. Poor value.

Train:

£90 x2 return (£180). Duration 4.5 hours. No. Poor value.

Coach:

£60 x2 return (£120). Duration 6 hours. No. Poor value.

Car:

£74 fuel. Expensive Parking approx £26. Total £100 / 2 (£50). Duration 4.5 hours. Yes. Good value.

It's still more economical to drive in cases where you have to travel. Otherwise don't travel.

I'll continue to drive as long as this is the case.

*This* weekend, the one just after a lot of schools break up? Good luck driving down to Newquay!

I'd be seriously tempted to go by rail, mainly to avoid the road traffic. Also potentially less stressful depending on how many changes you have to make.

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its a mystery why insurance has soared...I mean, every dealer I look at, their range has been built to make the cost of repairs as low as possible....bolt on panels, special bouncing materials....in this last respect, my daughter was hit in the rear in her C1....it looked mess, until in disgust i gave it a kick and a tug et voila...it all popped back into place.....from a mess to pristine in seconds.

I appreciate what you are saying, but in my opinion cars have got over complicated and very expensive to repair.

A brand new manufactured door mirror for an Austin, MG, Morris will cost £15 to £20. How much do wing mirrors on modern car cost now, when they get smashed? The over complicated head and rear tail light clusters go into several hundreds of pounds.

The "old style" round headlamps can be bought very cheaply, here is a new one for a Land Rover Defender costing £9.50 + VAT.

http://www.paddockspares.com/sealed-beam-unit-rhd-5003.html

Body repairs cost more now because of the wide use of metallic paints, which require much larger areas of the car to be repainted to get the paint to blend in, not to mention metallic paints require much more time, care and attention in application.

As with regards to your daughters C1, it may seem OK, but fiberglass/plastic bumpers can hide structural damage.

Edited by Take Me Back To London!
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Our delightful political elite has agreed to cut carbon emissions 80% by 2050 and people wonder why they are (deliberately) being priced off the roads.

The cost of motoring is not being driven by market forces. Most of the rises in energy costs are due to green levies.

As for insurance, the gubbermint has deliberately turned a blind eye to the massive levels of fraud being undertaken within the industry, including policeman taking bribes for selling third party information to insurance companies.

I stopped driving in 2007 when petrol was £1 litre

Motoring is a f**king extortion racket in the UK and I have solved this dilemma by refusing to participate.

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Believe it or not, I do understand.

But my statement remains true, you know it. And by continuing to participate in these stupid activities miles away you are, by hook or by crook, contributing to your own pressure cooker.

Give kids a stick and some string, gravel if they're lucky. No need for complicated stuff. ;)

to right, back in the day i was lucky if i was given an old cardboard box or a pencil and told to sod off outside and that was at christmas ! :D

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The problem is not the cost of transport. It's the cost of the ego boost that people expect with it.

Running a small petrol/diesel is cheaper than it was 10 years ago, both in terms of MPG and stealership costs.

It's just people expect air con, electric windows, huge name bagde etc etc. If we went back to cars being transportation, things are not any more expensive.

Aha! So it's GLOBAL WARMING that's to blame then! :P

Sorry! I meant Abrupt Climate Change!

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Ive been back in the uk for six months now and I haven't bought a car mainly due to the cost of motoring. I've bee using hire cars when I really needed a car for something big journeys etc. I looked at what you can buy for a £1000, not much!! Then add the cost of insurance, petrol, repairs etc. I worked out it is more cost effective to own a motorbike 125/alternatives for getting around town and use hire cars for wkds then to bother buying an old banger. There is definitely social pressure to own a car, I'd only get one if I needed it for commuting to work.

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