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Sterling Falls To 2-month Low Vs Firm Dollar

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http://today.reuters.co.uk/investing/finan...-33_L03573557:1

Sterling falls to 2-month low vs firm dollar

"Despite the good (manufacturing) survey the big picture is that the economy is not doing as well as previously thought. The interest rate outlook is looking increasingly like we will get a rate cut."
"Hometrack gave little sign of an upturn developing in the UK housing market," Bank of New York said in a note to clients.

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Guest muttley
$ won't be "firm" for much longer!

VP

I wouldn't take this as read.The Fed seem pretty determined to shore up the dollar.Does anyone doubt that they will raise interest rates again next month?

Many people seem to think that the dollar is about to crash.I would argue that it already did.

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I wouldn't take this as read.The Fed seem pretty determined to shore up the dollar.Does anyone doubt that they will raise interest rates again next month?

Futures give a 90% probability, there's above a 66% chance for Nov tightening too.

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I wouldn't take this as read.The Fed seem pretty determined to shore up the dollar.Does anyone doubt that they will raise interest rates again next month?

Many people seem to think that the dollar is about to crash.I would argue that it already did.

Its gold selling season for central banks. Expect the dollar to strengthen into the sale. When the banks are done, the dollar will puke and sterling is along for the ride.

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My own personal guess is that the £ will continue to weaken, steadily and our IRs will go down slowly but surely too - in three years time I'd guess 2.5-3%. then we'll join the Euro.

The dollar will stay roughly where it is against a basket of currencies, their IRs will go up for another 12 months and then start to come down.

There will be no dollar crash as, the world financial community just couldn't afford that to happen - the implications are a collapse of the world economic system. This won't be allowed to happen as it would destabilise the world. The governments of the world will act together to prevent this as there is so much at stake.

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My own personal guess is that the £ will continue to weaken, steadily and our IRs will go down slowly but surely too - in three years time I'd guess 2.5-3%. then we'll join the Euro.

The dollar will stay roughly where it is against a basket of currencies, their IRs will go up for another 12 months and then start to come down.

There will be no dollar crash as, the world financial community just couldn't afford that to happen - the implications are a collapse of the world economic system. This won't be allowed to happen as it would destabilise the world. The governments of the world will act together to prevent this as there is so much at stake.

It'll be interesting to see what happens when Iran start selling oil in Euros. I assume many middle eastern countries would like to follow suit, if only to annoy the Americans.

Also, would the EU really want to prop up the dollar? Would a switch to the Euro allow Europe to print money in the same way as the Americans have done for so long. I guess the major problem is that a dollar collapse could be extremely serious for the world economy and most countries would prefer to avoid that.

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My own personal guess is that the £ will continue to weaken, steadily and our IRs will go down slowly but surely too - in three years time I'd guess 2.5-3%. then we'll join the Euro.

The dollar will stay roughly where it is against a basket of currencies, their IRs will go up for another 12 months and then start to come down.

There will be no dollar crash as, the world financial community just couldn't afford that to happen - the implications are a collapse of the world economic system. This won't be allowed to happen as it would destabilise the world. The governments of the world will act together to prevent this as there is so much at stake.

Roaring inflation and devaulation will help take sterling down, the perfect recipe to join the Euro on extremely unfavourable terms, no doubt it will be cast as our saviour.

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Seems the Chinese have nothing to gain from destroying the world economic system - why not use the system and take over the world, rather than destroy the system and then take over the world.

A bit like the Arab states, they could destroy the world economic system by turning off the oil - but they won't because there is just too much to lose.

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why not use the system and take over the world

China has shown no interest or desire to "take over the world" unlike a certain large Western superpower we could all name. For imperialist impulses look elsewhere. China has enough trouble administering to it's own 1.3 billion citizens, never mind anybody else's.

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China has shown no interest or desire to "take over the world" unlike a certain large Western superpower we could all name. For imperialist impulses look elsewhere. China has enough trouble administering to it's own 1.3 billion citizens, never mind anybody else's.

yeah they were way past us primitive Europeans back in the 14th C... on the verge of an industrial revolution, gunpowder, voyages to Africa etc. But a lack of competitive pressures and a Confucianist culture led them to remain quite content without savaging the rest of the world... unlike us white folk in the following centuries...

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It is NOT TRUE.

CHINA WAS BACKWARD for so long because society was divided into LANDLORDS and RENTERS with POPULATION GROWTH removing incentives to get productive through CAPITAL as LABOUR was cheaper.

World Economies and Rise of the West

"Many of China's landlord-aristocrats had money, but they had disdain for grubby matters, including technological change. They saw themselves as gentlemen, and learned gentlemen did not speak of profits. They were imbued with the combination of Confucianism and Taoism. While seeing Europeans pressing upon China with their advanced technology, they tended to claim that it was all heaven's doing. They were not interested in imitating Europe. Their major interest was great books and elevation of the spirit. These intellectuals dominated China's bureaucracy. Government was little concerned with investing in economic development or in change. Bureaucrats made money from taking payment bites from transactions, and they saw change as merely disruption and jeopardy. While the landlord and bureaucrat aristocrats believed in intellectuality, the peasants believed in work - to survive. And all they had went into survival. "

Sounds a bit like the modern day UK?

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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