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Second Time Around

Cream Teas

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Mrs STA and I were having a chat about our forthcoming family holiday (both the children are now over 18, but haven't lost the desire to accompany us - yet)and we were soon taking a nostalgic look back on holidays and our memories from our own family holidays 40 years ago.

I remembered the first cream teas I had in Devon when on holiday there in 1968 and I recalled that we didn't always have scones served with jam and clotted cream, but something called "Devonshire Splits" which were a round bun made of sweet pastry dusted with icing sugar and cut horizontally like a scone or a tea cake. As I enjoyed them so much my mother made them for us when we got home and I found the recipe she used in her old BeRo cook book.

However, you don't see Devonshire splits offered with cream teas anymore - or at least not in places I have gone to over the years - it's always scones. I understand there is also a "Cornish Split", but when we were on holiday in Padstow last year we didn't come across any of these and I am curious to know if this is the same as a Devonshire Split, a variation of it or something different altogether. I thought there might be a HPCer out there who could cast some light on this.

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Mrs STA and I were having a chat about our forthcoming family holiday (both the children are now over 18, but haven't lost the desire to accompany us - yet)and we were soon taking a nostalgic look back on holidays and our memories from our own family holidays 40 years ago.

I remembered the first cream teas I had in Devon when on holiday there in 1968 and I recalled that we didn't always have scones served with jam and clotted cream, but something called "Devonshire Splits" which were a round bun made of sweet pastry dusted with icing sugar and cut horizontally like a scone or a tea cake. As I enjoyed them so much my mother made them for us when we got home and I found the recipe she used in her old BeRo cook book.

However, you don't see Devonshire splits offered with cream teas anymore - or at least not in places I have gone to over the years - it's always scones. I understand there is also a "Cornish Split", but when we were on holiday in Padstow last year we didn't come across any of these and I am curious to know if this is the same as a Devonshire Split, a variation of it or something different altogether. I thought there might be a HPCer out there who could cast some light on this.

I remember those 'Splits' well, and delicous they were. Haven't seen one lately.

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Where I grew up in Swansea there was a lovely lady - wish I could recall her name - who made these, along with other cakes, that she used to sell from her front living room. She also used to make a lemon variation.

You would go in there each day and she had the most wonderful different kinds of cakes for sale. This was back in the 70s.

Here are some images of variations:

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=devonshire+splits&rlz=1B3GGGL_enGB221GB222&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&biw=1072&bih=518

Mr. Kipling and the likes of M&S used to sell a version but made, obviously so they lasted in a tin, with a harder shortcrust pasty.

M&S used to sell the softer versions in their fresh cream cake selection up until about a year ago - they may still sell them for all I know, but I stopped eating wheat. I suspect they still sell them as they were very popular with lots of fresh cream and jam in a light pasty.

I think it is a generational thing - suspect these were hugely popular until other types of cake became popular. They used to fly off the shelves in M&S.

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I think it is a generational thing - suspect these were hugely popular until other types of cake became popular. They used to fly off the shelves in M&S.

Thanks MT. I am sure that some of these older types of cake will make a comeback some time in the future, but it seems strange that people clearly like to buy them from M&S and other stores when available, but when I go to a tea room or cafe they don't get offered as part of a cream tea when I know they certainly were 40 years ago. It might be a generational thing, but it might also be a side effect of marketing and media influencing the way we define things. Anyway the scone has somehow managed to supplant the split in the cream tea - and I don't remember having a vote on it. However Mrs STA has decided to bake some splits for tomorrow - with my help enlisted.

I am assuming the Devonshire split is the same as a Cornish one.

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I found the recipe she used in her old BeRo cook book.

I will check if I've got the recipe and pass it on to my bf's mum... she is always looking for baking ideas.

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Thanks MT. I am sure that some of these older types of cake will make a comeback some time in the future, but it seems strange that people clearly like to buy them from M&S and other stores when available, but when I go to a tea room or cafe they don't get offered as part of a cream tea when I know they certainly were 40 years ago. It might be a generational thing, but it might also be a side effect of marketing and media influencing the way we define things. Anyway the scone has somehow managed to supplant the split in the cream tea - and I don't remember having a vote on it. However Mrs STA has decided to bake some splits for tomorrow - with my help enlisted.

I am assuming the Devonshire split is the same as a Cornish one.

I suspect they just don't have the shelf life - they are basically an airy bready bun aren't they with the cream and jam added...

I notice they get snapped up in M&S when I used to go in there and mainly by ladies in their 60s and above.

I think people in Devon must be miffed as between scones and pasties Cornwall seem to be taking all the glory.

I suspect, just like the pasties, there are Cornish and Devonish varieties of these splits with differences known only to those who care. Or perhaps some might say that one county has 'stolen' the idea from the other. It might end in war :lol:

If you do a google there are plenty of receipes online for them.

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I suspect they just don't have the shelf life - they are basically an airy bready bun aren't they with the cream and jam added...

I notice they get snapped up in M&S when I used to go in there and mainly by ladies in their 60s and above.

I think people in Devon must be miffed as between scones and pasties Cornwall seem to be taking all the glory.

I suspect, just like the pasties, there are Cornish and Devonish varieties of these splits with differences known only to those who care. Or perhaps some might say that one county has 'stolen' the idea from the other. It might end in war :lol:

If you do a google there are plenty of receipes online for them.

Thanks. I've had a look for Cornish Splits and found the following recipe on a French website - great to see them recognised in a country where food is appreciated:My link

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  • 292 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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