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flyingscotsman

Homebuyer Report Says There Are Defects

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So - got the Homebuyer Report from the surveyor today and overall not too bad. Structurally the house is sound - it is a couple of issues inside that are a concern.

Comments regarding electricity suggest the installation appears dated and there are safety deficiencies. For example the consumer unit does not incorporate modern circuit protection devices and there is limited evidence of earth cross bonding. The opinion of the surveyor is that the installation should be brought up to modern standards.

I am going to speak to the surveyor and ask if this means the house needs re-wiring throughout.

The other issues are that the house is centrally heated by an oil fired boiler and has not been tested for 18 months and getting a sweep to check the living room flue.

The plan was to go back to the estate agent to make them aware of the issues and get them to put it to the vendor that they seek to resolve them before exchanging contracts.

There is also the problem of the house we want to buy being 3 hours away so it is difficult for us to arrange getting quotes for work to be done if we were to take on this responsibility. Our view being that since the vendors are obviously in the house and in a much better position to have the work done that is recommended by the surveyor.

For those of you reading this who have been in similar situations how did you resolve to have issues sorted out before committing to the purchase.

Any advice would be gratefully received.

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Just out of interest are you buying with a mortgage 3 hours from where you work? If so what mortgage company offers this facility?

I had read of people getting turned away because the house was to far from work. This is not great if you want to relocate.

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Comments regarding electricity suggest the installation appears dated and there are safety deficiencies. For example the consumer unit does not incorporate modern circuit protection devices and there is limited evidence of earth cross bonding. The opinion of the surveyor is that the installation should be brought up to modern standards.

I am going to speak to the surveyor and ask if this means the house needs re-wiring throughout.

The plan was to go back to the estate agent to make them aware of the issues and get them to put it to the vendor that they seek to resolve them before exchanging contracts.

If the house needs to be rewired, it will also need to be replastered and redecorated. This is not a short term job and not something a vendor is going to do before exchanging contracts. Just imagine spending £2000 rewiring, £1000 redecorating, every evening after work for 3 months getting it done, just to discover the buyer has walked. And assuming you actually want the house (as you pulled the trigger on a survey), this approach does not help you to move in.

A more appropriate scenario is to get a quote and deduct that from the negotiated sale price. You don't even need to get a sparky to see the house. Just phone one up and ask how much to rewire a 3 bed house with two reception rooms and fit RCDs (or however many rooms it has)

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A more appropriate scenario is to get a quote and deduct that from the negotiated sale price. You don't even need to get a sparky to see the house. Just phone one up and ask how much to rewire a 3 bed house with two reception rooms and fit RCDs (or however many rooms it has)

I had kind of thought that this would be the answer - at least for this work. Some of the issues can be addressed by the vendor - e.g. servicing a boiler etc.

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As previous posters have said, the rewiring will cost a few thousand and make some mess, although electricians are pretty clever about running cables discreetly. The age of the wiring would have been apparent from just looking at the fusebox, so I don't think you have a case re: negotiating the price downwards as it's hardly a new discovery, although you can always try. I think you could reasonably ask to have the boiler serviced, but I think that's about it. Your solicitor will be able to advise. If you're buying a second home you need to be aware of the running costs and time input required to sort out remotely the inevitable problems that will arise during your ownership. This varies wildy from house to house and year to year but can run to thousands of pounds a year, and many hours.

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As previous posters have said, the rewiring will cost a few thousand and make some mess, although electricians are pretty clever about running cables discreetly. The age of the wiring would have been apparent from just looking at the fusebox, so I don't think you have a case re: negotiating the price downwards as it's hardly a new discovery, although you can always try. I think you could reasonably ask to have the boiler serviced, but I think that's about it. Your solicitor will be able to advise. If you're buying a second home you need to be aware of the running costs and time input required to sort out remotely the inevitable problems that will arise during your ownership. This varies wildy from house to house and year to year but can run to thousands of pounds a year, and many hours.

It does not require rewiring. It requires a new consumer unit (£100 plus labour to fit it, which cannot be more than half a day to a day, so under £1,000 total). The earth bonding is a matter of a few minutes work. By all means see if you can negotiate the price down a little, but this is not rewiring the surveyor is talking about. Modern wiring (installed post 1960ish) does not have an expiry date. Yes the specs have changed - the earth wire has become thicker, early lighting circuits didn't have any earth, but no need to rewire - and if you suggest this your vendor will think you're having a laugh.

Oh yes, and if you want the vendor to pay to have your chimney swept or your boiler serviced, don't be surprised if he tells you to go and find something different to buy.

Edited by Telometer

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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