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Flood Risk To New Homes Being Ignored, Says Report

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jul/14/flood-risk-new-homes-ignored

Local authorities are continuing to allow tens of thousands of houses to be built on floodplains, despite a growing risk of flooding as climate change takes hold, according to a report from the government's climate adviser.

The report, from a sub-unit of the Committee on Climate Change, also found a marked increase in the risk of drought across the country. At present, only 8% of key water "resource zones" – catchment areas for water – are in danger of a shortfall in supplies, even in a severe drought. Within 15 years, that number is likely to be about 45% if nothing is done, meaning millions of people could be affected.

Lord Krebs, chair of the adaptation sub-committee, called on the government to take action urgently to head off much greater problems with drought and flooding. These could include tougher building regulations so that all houses were equipped with water-saving devices, including water meters, and those at risk of flood with preventive measures, ranging from sealed airbricks to raised floors and flood-resistant paint.

Got the hidden agenda of it's down to climate change but who would want to buy a house on a flood plain where you can't get insurance? These houses will be worthless but yet some people are going to be given nice big mortgages to buy them with. Perhaps the banks should just stop lending for these houses, and if you can't get insurance should you be able to borrow the money?

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These houses will be worthless but yet some people are going to be given nice big mortgages to buy them with. Perhaps the banks should just stop lending for these houses, and if you can't get insurance should you be able to borrow the money?

I thought that was already the case: that insurers are refusing to cover new builds in high risk areas and that if you can't get insurance, you can't get a mortgage.

If it's not, then the insurance industry would do well to take the lead and force the local authorities' hands.

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I thought that was already the case: that insurers are refusing to cover new builds in high risk areas and that if you can't get insurance, you can't get a mortgage.

If it's not, then the insurance industry would do well to take the lead and force the local authorities' hands.

That's good news then, just not read anything to confirm that is happening. Only read that people already living in these areas can't get insurance.

What amazes me is the banks lending the money to the builders to build these houses in the first place.

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The risk should be built in to the pricing of the houses at say 50% off local asking prices.

Is it a legal requirement to state to the owners of new build that they are in a flood area?

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jul/14/flood-risk-new-homes-ignored

Got the hidden agenda of it's down to climate change but who would want to buy a house on a flood plain where you can't get insurance? These houses will be worthless but yet some people are going to be given nice big mortgages to buy them with. Perhaps the banks should just stop lending for these houses, and if you can't get insurance should you be able to borrow the money?

What I don't understand is who is going to lend on properties that might become unsaleable due to flood risk. Especially now.

Daughter recently had huge mortgage glitches over the fact of an absentee freeholder, on a property with absolutely no other negatives, despite the fact that there's a statutory right to buy a f/h and she'd already embarked on the process.

ATM it seems they're looking for absolutely any excuse not to lend.

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People seem to have decided that flooding is not a problem any more. Just how short can their memories be. Would you drive down a road called Marsh Street and think, this is a nice place to live in a new house? People are doing just that near where I live.

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The risk should be built in to the pricing of the houses at say 50% off local asking prices.

Is it a legal requirement to state to the owners of new build that they are in a flood area?

Erm. Is it a legal requirement to point out the obvious?

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What I don't understand is who is going to lend on properties that might become unsaleable due to flood risk. Especially now.

Daughter recently had huge mortgage glitches over the fact of an absentee freeholder, on a property with absolutely no other negatives, despite the fact that there's a statutory right to buy a f/h and she'd already embarked on the process.

ATM it seems they're looking for absolutely any excuse not to lend.

if they build they sell....clearly someone IS lending.

Moral Hazard has another cost.

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Erm. Is it a legal requirement to point out the obvious?

clearly, you are unfamiliar with DIVERSITY requirements.

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What climate change? I used to live in GROTster (Gloucester) and they started building on flood prone areas that had been so for at least 50 years. Sure enough, within about 5 years of build, they get flooded out and cannot be lived in for about a year.

Utter madness. Yet there's plenty of land that could be used where no problems exist. But how to get hold of it.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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