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Degree Educated Children Just Can't Afford To Move Out

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http://www.dailymail...ndent-life.html

In the past, adults who lived with their parents into their twenties and beyond were often characterized as failures

However, the stigma no longer applies.

These 'children' are supposed to be high flying middle class people of a socioeconomic status in the grouping ABC1, yet they struggle to achieve above grade E. They are the lowest of the low (yet refer to themselves as middle clarrrs). Many are unable to generate a landlord a positive yield on highly subsidised B2L 'investments', even when they are given housing benefit to pay unto their landlord, who can offset the rent against mortgage liabilities. Heaven forbid they get a job and have to pay rent out of a taxed income!!!

The average FTB will buy at 37, perhaps have a disabled child at 40, one that won't ever move out, and if their dilapidated reproductive equipment can produce a healthy child, the poor bugger won't be able to move out until he is 35+. Just in time for them to sell their home off to pay for their old age care.

Buy now before it is too late!

Edited by Formerly Unemployed Youth

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Alternatively. Get pregnant at 16, be given a house and a steady benefit income, spawn a couple more for some fag money .. And retire at 32 when they've all got a council house of their own

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Alternatively. Get pregnant at 16, be given a house and a steady benefit income, spawn a couple more for some fag money .. And retire at 32 when they've all got a council house of their own

No the best thing to do is wait until late 30's earlie 40's and have the kid , then by the time it has grown up they will give you a pension instead of trying to force you out to work when the kid grows up.

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Only my own personal observations.....it is more often than not that the boys/men that stay living in the parental home far longer than the girls...the girls I find fledge the comfort nest sooner and are also less likely to return in the future than the boys.... I am sure there are lots of reasons for this....but that is how it is, imo. ;)

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That's because housing benefit props up rents, making BTL very attractive. Hence many people in media who ramp property, and those born in the right years own multiple BTL, second homes, and holiday homes.

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No the best thing to do is wait until late 30's earlie 40's and have the kid , then by the time it has grown up they will give you a pension instead of trying to force you out to work when the kid grows up.

This happens more than you think. I used to work for the DWP and saw it all the time... career single mums who have one last throw at the pregnancy dice usually a fair few years apart from their first 3-4 children and early/mid forties to take them threw to 'retirement'.

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nope, our eldest is 10 now and still living at home, they just wont take the goddam hints

Oh if only the coal mines were still open.

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nope, our eldest is 10 now and still living at home, they just wont take the goddam hints

Lets hope its not a male, if its a girl, and you have brought her up with good morals, maybe I could marry her for breeding purposes and we could climb up the carncil ladder together and have a nuclear family. If it's a lad, then I hope you get on well (for the next 20 or so years).

Perhaps the western world could see increasing abortion amongst women pregnant with sons. Maybe it would lead to a lower likelihood of gendercide a decade or so from now (in the kosovan sense http://www.gendercide.org/gendercide_and_genocide.html)

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Over 10 years ago I had three As at A Level, solid 2:1 from middle of the road uni and could barely afford to live independently in a squalid shared house. My debts were small by today's standards.

Out in the real world most degrees - even many of the solid ones - are useless in the jobs market. The milkround grad traineeships where a good Philosophy grad might get trained up to be an exec at a bluechip barely exist.

I've known girls with good humanities degrees train as hair dressers or beauty therapists in their late twenties/early thirties because they were sick of dull dead-end McOffice life - effectively doing what they could have done at the local FE college aged 18. Only advantage of all that education is coming across as classy and intelligent with clients that prefer that to an orange-tanned bimbo talking rot.

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Degree educated children? When do people stop being classified as children nowadays then? When they get to retirement age?

http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/ihstory.aspx?storycode=6512433

When they can afford to rent a one bed flat through the tax-benefit system? (35)

With a lower applicable amount of housing benefit entitlement, the taper rate will kick in sooner, and anybody receiving housing benefit will ultimately receive less.

Not so much as a problem up North, where housing benefit is a proportion of a wage.

But down South where rent exceeds a minimum wage income, it will reduce many peoples income & the standard of the average Southerner's housing.

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Only my own personal observations.....it is more often than not that the boys/men that stay living in the parental home far longer than the girls...the girls I find fledge the comfort nest sooner and are also less likely to return in the future than the boys.... I am sure there are lots of reasons for this....but that is how it is, imo. ;)

There is one principal reason for it with splits into a number of subsidiary reasons, I would argue. For the last 20-30 years women in all walks of life below senior management/mega high earners have had an inherent advantage both in the job market and as beneficiaries of the welfare state. In short, they are likely to have a higher and more stable income than their male equivalents, thereby being better able to leave home and stay away. The subsidiary reasons:

1. Feminism and equal opportunities legislation resulting in what is in effect widespread positive discrimination for women.

2. The big reduction of primarily physical, dangerous, and/or technologically based jobs paying middle and upper-middle incomes, which were primarily taken by men, in heavy industry, from the 1970s onwards. Of the relatively few such jobs that remain, I wonder what proportion of power station workers, railway maintenance engineers, motor mechanics etc. are women? Hardly any, and when you find one, she'll probably in the manager's office rather than on the shop floor. And the reason can't be discrimination/misogyny, given the raft of PC legislation that now exists. Rather, if it's a job is physically demanding, dangerous and/or is primarily about the application of technical knowledge, women don't want to do it as a general rule. Men do, and so have been hit disproportionately hard by the reduction in these jobs.

3. The growth in the public sector, which for the last half-century has employed a majority of women and continues to do so.

4. The growth in the service sector, which again tends to employ women in upper-middle income, long term stable positions.

5. The no-questions-asked provision of council flats and a decent income by the taxpayer for single mothers.

Time and time again, feminists cite as evidence for their claim that they are systemically discriminated against the absence of mega-earning women in Fred the Shred-type jobs. Given that the total proportion of the population overall on that sort of salary is tiny, this is a red herring. I suspect that if you counted up all the workers on permanent contracts earning £25-40k (i.e. middle income to just above it), you would now find a clear majority of women.

Edited by The Ayatollah Buggeri

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There is one principal reason for it with splits into a number of subsidiary reasons, I would argue. For the last 20-30 years women in all walks of life below senior management/mega high earners have had an inherent advantage both in the job market and as beneficiaries of the welfare state. In short, they are likely to have a higher and more stable income than their male equivalents, thereby being better placed to leave home and stay away. The subsidiary reasons:

1. Feminism and equal opportunities legislation resulting in what is in effect widespread positive discrimination for women.

2. The big reduction of primarily physical, dangerous, and/or technologically based jobs paying middle and upper-middle incomes, which were primarily taken by men, in heavy industry, from the 1970s onwards.

3. The growth in the public sector, which for the last half-century has employed a majority of women and continues to do so.

4. The growth in the service sector, which again tends to employ women in upper-middle income, long term stable positions.

5. The no-questions-asked provision of council flats and a decent income by the taxpayer for single mothers.

Time and time again, feminists cite as evidence for their claim that they are systemically discriminated against the absence of mega-earning women in Fred the Shred-type jobs. Given that the total proportion of the population overall on that sort of salary is tiny, this is a red herring. I suspect that if you counted up all the workers on permanent contracts earning £25-40k (i.e. middle income to just above it), you would now find a clear majority of women.

i doubt it, although i cant be arsed to try and bac k that up,

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LOVE the top-rated post:

Thanks for making me feel good about myself DM. I would love to try and by able to 'handle' independent life but due to the housing bubble every half decent house that isnt located in stabsville is beyond my safe budget. I can't keep up with inflation, every year my salary gets frozen and the cost of living goes up. I'm swimming against an ever increasing tide. I'm 31 forced to live at home with my parents. I say forced; in that if I didn't I wouldent be able to save for a safe deposit to put down on a house. Even though I work hard every day and try and do my best for myself and my community I've never seen any reward. Life is passing me by and I feel like a complete failure. I'd love to write more but I have to get up soon, start work and pay my taxes in order for the government to give some fat baby machine to buy another Nintendo DS for her next parasite of a baby. Hope I didn't come across bitter - I'm just sad.

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LOVE the top-rated post:

Thanks for making me feel good about myself DM. I would love to try and by able to 'handle' independent life but due to the housing bubble every half decent house that isnt located in stabsville is beyond my safe budget. I can't keep up with inflation, every year my salary gets frozen and the cost of living goes up. I'm swimming against an ever increasing tide. I'm 31 forced to live at home with my parents. I say forced; in that if I didn't I wouldent be able to save for a safe deposit to put down on a house. Even though I work hard every day and try and do my best for myself and my community I've never seen any reward. Life is passing me by and I feel like a complete failure. I'd love to write more but I have to get up soon, start work and pay my taxes in order for the government to give some fat baby machine to buy another Nintendo DS for her next parasite of a baby. Hope I didn't come across bitter - I'm just sad.

Nobodys a failure, you are a function of FIAT, some lose some win, as Dan1 always highlights,hes bitter and deserves to be, but you cant beat a credit cycle, i fundamentally blame your politicians, i view the UK as nothing more than a banana republic since the expenses thing and only put 3 people away but at some point in the future, that sh!t goes down, if it didnt wed still have the USSR, at some point common sense will prevail, may or maynot be too late for you, but all those expecting to live of the last 30 years debt expansion will get a rude awakening. Every dog has its day

Edited by georgia o'keeffe

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LOVE the top-rated post:

Thanks for making me feel good about myself DM. I would love to try and by able to 'handle' independent life but due to the housing bubble every half decent house that isnt located in stabsville is beyond my safe budget. I can't keep up with inflation, every year my salary gets frozen and the cost of living goes up. I'm swimming against an ever increasing tide. I'm 31 forced to live at home with my parents. I say forced; in that if I didn't I wouldent be able to save for a safe deposit to put down on a house. Even though I work hard every day and try and do my best for myself and my community I've never seen any reward. Life is passing me by and I feel like a complete failure. I'd love to write more but I have to get up soon, start work and pay my taxes in order for the government to give some fat baby machine to buy another Nintendo DS for her next parasite of a baby. Hope I didn't come across bitter - I'm just sad.

If you aren't on the local housing waiting list, get on it.

If you aren't on the waiting lists for housing in nearby areas, get on them.

If the crash don't come, at least you put your name down in 11 and can upgrade in due time.

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You're from America, right?

FYI you've all heard it before, but I'm nearly 27 and at home. Absolutely gutted as the place is full to the brim and I'm sharing a room. Saving a lot of money and I'm so glad of having the option but I'm increasingly reaching breaking point.

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If you aren't on the local housing waiting list, get on it.

If you aren't on the waiting lists for housing in nearby areas, get on them.

If the crash don't come, at least you put your name down in 11 and can upgrade in due time.

We're in a council house right now - had terrible neighbours for a decade and even now with decent neighbours, the street has some very undesirable people in it (there was a drugs raid three doors down last year, the guy through the wall got arrested for possessing a gun, lots of benefits junkies and plain old junkies, and the kids shout threadts like 'rapist' at you if you dare look at them). Don't think I want to be waiting on any council housing list, unfortunately.

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You're from America, right?

FYI you've all heard it before, but I'm nearly 27 and at home. Absolutely gutted as the place is full to the brim and I'm sharing a room. Saving a lot of money and I'm so glad of having the option but I'm increasingly reaching breaking point.

Nope im a brit but left at the back end of 06, its up to you whether you give up, but an economy can only function if ts viable, the only certainty is change, if you are smart, learn as much as humanly possible to absorb and the you have choices if you are smart. It all comes down to govt, once every hundred years we realise how self serving and inept they are, we just happen to be at that point, My advice, forget the become a zillionaire buy a share or commodity wealth offered on here and become the best engineer u can, and doors open

and im only 31 that should highlight that its about luck of timing more than anything

Edited by georgia o'keeffe

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We're in a council house right now - had terrible neighbours for a decade and even now with decent neighbours, the street has some very undesirable people in it (there was a drugs raid three doors down last year, the guy through the wall got arrested for possessing a gun, lots of benefits junkies and plain old junkies, and the kids shout threadts like 'rapist' at you if you dare look at them). Don't think I want to be waiting on any council housing list, unfortunately.

I'm in a housing association property in a poor area bordered by two notorious council estates (that I am actively bidding for!). Quite a few of my neighbours are on benefits, quite a few take drugs, quite a few work. Just a shame the rent for a 1bed HA flat is more than a 3 bed council property with a large garden nearby.

Ok ,one of the neighbours makes a bit of noise and has the police round fairly often, but he's salt of earth if you know him, and I can't think less of him for punching a copper.

The kids shouting at you thing is a bit weird though. Young lads you can give a clip or give em some gip and send them on their way, but the young girls shouting 'get your bum out', that's a bit weird.

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You're from America, right?

FYI you've all heard it before, but I'm nearly 27 and at home. Absolutely gutted as the place is full to the brim and I'm sharing a room. Saving a lot of money and I'm so glad of having the option but I'm increasingly reaching breaking point.

When I was your age (I'm 44 now), I barely had two pennies to rub together and it hadn't even occurred to me to start saving for a house. The little cash I earned went on rent (edit: rooms in shared houses - more social interaction), food and having a good time, and I'd never considered living with my parents. That was also the year I met my future wife - I don't think she would have fancied me much if I was still living with mum!

I guess what I'm trying to say is that owning a house isn't everything, certainly not when you're young and single. My advice would be: move out (maybe abroad, but only if you know what you're getting into), live a little, and just forget saving for now. Life is passing you by!

Edited by snowflux

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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