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A Third Of Universities To Charge Standard £9,000 Fee

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-14111421

More than a third of England's universities have had their plans to charge £9,000 for every course officially approved.

Some 58% will be allowed to charge £9,000 for at least some courses in 2012, said the fees watchdog the Office for Fair Access.

But it also revealed that no university had been forced to cut its fees during negotiations.

Ministers said far more money would now be spent on attracting poorer students.

Every university wanting to charge more than £6,000 in fees has had to have its proposals to attract more students from disadvantaged backgrounds approved by Offa.

So if no one has been forced to cut it's fee's, nearly 100% of Uni's will be charging £9k then????

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/14117588

It's bad luck for us but these changes are necessary. I'll only start repaying when I start earning £21,000 and it's over so many years that I'm not sure I'll really notice it

Laura Eunson, 17, Farnborough College

Some people aren't really financially literate are they? Still I'm sure the banksters wouldn't have it any other way, got love the reasoning it's over many years and they don't question why it's going to take many years.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-14111421

So if no one has been forced to cut it's fee's, nearly 100% of Uni's will be charging £9k then????

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/14117588

Some people aren't really financially literate are they? Still I'm sure the banksters wouldn't have it any other way, got love the reasoning it's over many years and they don't question why it's going to take many years.

and they dont question fiscal drag being used by some other non entity in govt of the future to bring that figure lower, i was innocent once upon a time

Edited by georgia o'keeffe

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Some people aren't really financially literate are they? Still I'm sure the banksters wouldn't have it any other way, got love the reasoning it's over many years and they don't question why it's going to take many years.

Like all other sub-prime lending, people only look at the monthly repayments, NOT the total payable.

Not that it matters; as such a small number will actually ever get themselves into the financial position to pay any loan capital off anyway. It may have been shoved behind the curtain, but the elephant is still in the room.

The deficit hysteria: A good distraction/justification for various polital agendas, but sadly nothing to do with ANY governement actually saving any money long term.

Ditto Armed forces, NHS, Councils etc etc.

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I don't really have a problem with loans in principle, but I do have a problem with them having a high interest rate of RPI + 3% and apparently no ability to overpay or pay off early, to cut your interest bill. This is totally wrong. They could at least just charge CPI, or the BOE base rate, and allow early repayments.

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and they dont question fiscal drag being used by some other non entity in govt of the future to bring that figure lower, i was innocent once upon a time

Good one.

I also expect another 'funding crisis' to justify fees rising to £12,000 a year, then £15,000, £20,000 etc.

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So if no one has been forced to cut it's fee's, nearly 100% of Uni's will be charging £9k then????

Some people aren't really financially literate are they? Still I'm sure the banksters wouldn't have it any other way, got love the reasoning it's over many years and they don't question why it's going to take many years.

And the government is going to spend more money on access for poorer kids.

Plus spending money on writing off debts, on a fairly major scale.

You do have to think that merely adding a few p to income tax would have been cleaner and simpler. But the bankers couldn't profit from that..

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I don't really have a problem with loans in principle, but I do have a problem with them having a high interest rate of RPI + 3% and apparently no ability to overpay or pay off early, to cut your interest bill. This is totally wrong. They could at least just charge CPI, or the BOE base rate, and allow early repayments.

Tax doesn't work like that I'm afraid. ;)

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I don't really have a problem with loans in principle, but I do have a problem with them having a high interest rate of RPI + 3% and apparently no ability to overpay or pay off early, to cut your interest bill. This is totally wrong. They could at least just charge CPI, or the BOE base rate, and allow early repayments.

Just glad my mortgage is scheduled to be paid off in time for the kids to go to uni. No way are they taking a deal like that. Must be possible to pay cash up front.

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I am disappointed with the marketing skills of some of these universities.

Why not have headline grabbing fees of say £7999 p.a. with an unobtrusive "arrangement fee" of £1001 detailed in the small print?

They should learn from our mortgage lenders.

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Get into bricklaying, plumbing,electrics or wood.

No debt and work for cash.

Have to agree, the tradesmen skills are also very portable to overseas locations for when the UK turns into a wasteland.

IMO unless you are looking at becoming an highly paid Lawyer or Doctor then the break even point of going to University over becoming a tradesman is now just too fascicle.

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Just glad my mortgage is scheduled to be paid off in time for the kids to go to uni. No way are they taking a deal like that. Must be possible to pay cash up front.

I agree. This part of the policy is a lib dem one, attempting to ensure that students who do well after graduation have to pay huge amounts of interest. I would guess many better off parents will consider lending or giving the children the money themselves, to avoid this scheme.

In effect the new scheme will encourage students who do not think they will ever earn very much, whilst putting off the ones who think they will.

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I am disappointed with the marketing skills of some of these universities.

Why not have headline grabbing fees of say £7999 p.a. with an unobtrusive "arrangement fee" of £1001 detailed in the small print?

They should learn from our mortgage lenders.

:lol:

A small deposit of £1000 can secure your place at Lincoln today.

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I agree. This part of the policy is a lib dem one, attempting to ensure that students who do well after graduation have to pay huge amounts of interest. I would guess many better off parents will consider lending or giving the children the money themselves, to avoid this scheme.

In effect the new scheme will encourage students who do not think they will ever earn very much, whilst putting off the ones who think they will.

Actually, I suspect that the real high flyers will end up paying less - they'll pay bigger installments and hence clear the debt quickly.

It's the ones in the middle who really get it in the shorts.

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I also expect another 'funding crisis' to justify fees rising to £12,000 a year, then £15,000, £20,000 etc.

£9k is about what the middle-ranking state universities in the US charge for most courses, and not far off what is charged in other English-speaking countries. If our fees go significantly above that, it will start to make sense for students to go abroad to study in significant numbers.

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loads of these kids are gonna default.

How? It's in an Act of Parliament that student loans from the government are non-dischargeable by bankruptcy.

Since the 90s, student debt has slowly evolved to become a financier's dream: non-dischargeable, index-linked, and collected by HMRC directly from your payslip under threat of imprisonment if you try to evade taxation.

Possible escape routes would be to leave the formal economy and work for cash for the rest of your life, or leave the country.

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I would guess many better off parents will consider lending or giving the children the money themselves, to avoid this scheme.

Many such parents will have been forking out upwards of £20K p.a. per offspring on school fees and the change to paying university fees will be a relief.

With the increasingly required masters' degrees, doctorates, unpaid internships etc. the perceived threshhold for full on parental support in many cases is now up to at least 25 yrs old.

Life stages are being attenuated.

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So which degrees will be the most profitable for universities?

Will this mean that moving forward, Universities will cut out the hundreds of Degree's that seemed a bit pointless?

And stick to the core Medicine, Engineering, Economics, Law etc, you know, the proper ones?

Is that such a bad thing?

Edited by Dan1

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So which degrees will be the most profitable for universities?

Since they are going to charge flat fees, the most profitable degrees will be the ones that cost the least to provide. Think media studies, tourism studies, events management etc. All you need is a lecture theatre and a berk with a laser pointer.

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Actually, I suspect that the real high flyers will end up paying less - they'll pay bigger installments and hence clear the debt quickly.

It's the ones in the middle who really get it in the shorts.

That is the point. The current proposals will prevent them doing so, even if they can afford to.

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So which degrees will be the most profitable for universities?

Will this mean that moving forward, Universities will cut out the hundreds of Degree's that seemed a bit pointless?

And stick to the core Medicine, Engineering, Economics, Law etc, you know, the proper ones?

Is that such a bad thing?

Nope those are probably the most expensive to provide.

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So which degrees will be the most profitable for universities?

Will this mean that moving forward, Universities will cut out the hundreds of Degree's that seemed a bit pointless?

And stick to the core Medicine, Engineering, Economics, Law etc, you know, the proper ones?

Is that such a bad thing?

The one with any kind of practical lab component - science, engineering - are expensive to run and much less profitable.

It's likely we'll end up churning out humanities students to carry on screwing up the government and administration of the country, and maths and finance graduates to go into the City and carry on screwing over the country.

Science and engineering courses may well survive if students work out these jobs can be lucrative, but only if they leave the country once they graduate.

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This leaves the market wide open for Internet based universities.

Apart from courses that need lab work, there is not much that cannot be taught (often better) over the net. Rather than having some bored professor drone on at you between the research they are really there for you can have an interactive course you can do at your own pace, while having a part time job. You would only need to go in to do exams, and they could hire a hall for that. Tutor groups could be via Skype, etc.

37K plus living costs for a couple of (often useless) letters after your name ffs. I left Uni with £2K debt, worked like mad to pay it off in a year - still kept me up at night.

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This leaves the market wide open for Internet based universities.

Apart from courses that need lab work, there is not much that cannot be taught (often better) over the net. Rather than having some bored professor drone on at you between the research they are really there for you can have an interactive course you can do at your own pace, while having a part time job. You would only need to go in to do exams, and they could hire a hall for that. Tutor groups could be via Skype, etc.

Wouldn't work for any science based courses where lab time is more important than lecture time. Or engineering.

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  • 309 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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