Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

fluffy666

Getting New(Er) Car..

Recommended Posts

So I've been in the market for a slightly newer and more fuel efficient car than a 1.8 petrol Mondeo (2001X).

Interesting going around second hand car garages. All of them basically saying the same thing - old cars with big(ish) petrol engines piling up, no one buying them. Can't say I'm surprised, going from the above car to a 2 litre TDCi C Max should save £60-70 per month - which would easily pay for a loan for the difference in price.

Seems a pity to be basically writing off an entire class of cars - I suspect that the mondeo will end up scrap despite being mechanically sound. You have to wonder if it would be possible to stack enough batteries in one to get a 30-40 mile range as an EV, sure there's a business opportunity there..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big petrol engine cars are a fabulous bargain at the moment. The £20,000 cost of a Prius buys you a stupendous second hand Jag with £16,000 change to spend on petrol and serviceing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends what you want it for.

If you do minimum mileage and want a really nice car, a Jag, BMW, Merc, Porsche, Ferrari etc would be a cheap way of getting lots of bang for your buck. But, if like me, you're driving 15,000 to 20,000 miles a year in Europe, a good torquey diesel makes real sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want a mondeo 1.8, is it the new(er) shape and how many miles has it done?

Most of my motoring is motorway anyway, for which my 2.4 litre is actually more economical than my 1.0 litre previous.

Course, the 1.0 was faaarrr more economical in town, but i dont do much town driving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Older,bigger engined stuff is just totally unsaleable.I had a girl in at the weekend with a 99T reg Golf GTi,quite nice and a couple of years ago would be worth £3k. Today I would most likely have to take it to the yard and accept £200.She wanted to buy a small engined cheap to run car.I had an 03 Astra Diesel at £1495 but I don't want the GTi unless its £200.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want a mondeo 1.8, is it the new(er) shape and how many miles has it done?

Most of my motoring is motorway anyway, for which my 2.4 litre is actually more economical than my 1.0 litre previous.

Course, the 1.0 was faaarrr more economical in town, but i dont do much town driving.

Mk3, 73k (mainly single track country lanes). Significant issues with the handbrake. Front bumper held together with duct tape (tree stump came out of nowhere, it's fault entirely). Rear view mirror screwed to a block of wood, tucked behind the top upholstery. If you drive at a steady 56 mph, 3 feet behind a HGV, you might get 40 mpg if lucky. Oh, and I have suspicions about the clutch.

Hmmm. Can't imagine why it was hard to trade in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mk3, 73k (mainly single track country lanes). Significant issues with the handbrake. Front bumper held together with duct tape (tree stump came out of nowhere, it's fault entirely). Rear view mirror screwed to a block of wood, tucked behind the top upholstery. If you drive at a steady 56 mph, 3 feet behind a HGV, you might get 40 mpg if lucky. Oh, and I have suspicions about the clutch.

Hmmm. Can't imagine why it was hard to trade in.

Clutch could be terminal.Dual Mass flywheel,quite pricy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clutch could be terminal.Dual Mass flywheel,quite pricy.

On a 1.8 petrol? I thought it was only the TDCi models that had dual mass flywheels? Please correct me if I'm wrong; I'm in the market for a 1.6 or maybe 1.8 Focus of the same-ish age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was thinking about trading in the s class for a frugel diesel estate.

Took the car into audi for its mot and service. For once pleasantly surprised. Quite a few things needed doing, but relatively low cost and they fixed a couple of things for free, in marked contrast to previous jobs.

I think they may have finally realised that if they continue screwing people over on service costs their chances of getting repeat business becomes vanishingly small.

Anyway, hats off to them, they seem to be slowly getting their act together. Car runs really well now, noticably better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a 1.8 petrol? I thought it was only the TDCi models that had dual mass flywheels? Please correct me if I'm wrong; I'm in the market for a 1.6 or maybe 1.8 Focus of the same-ish age.

Some information on the matter here. http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/faq/dual-mass-flywheels/

I have an X Type 2.5 petrol V6 auto. Has anyone heard of it being a problem on them?

edit,bit left out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a 1.8 petrol? I thought it was only the TDCi models that had dual mass flywheels? Please correct me if I'm wrong; I'm in the market for a 1.6 or maybe 1.8 Focus of the same-ish age.

I've only ever seen it on diesels.

Bumper repair and clutch might set you back a bit at a dealer but would be no problem to a lot of DIY mechanics.

Unless you abuse it yourself I'm never sure it's worth changing a car in for a newer used which is always, to a degree, an unknown quantity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some information on the matter here. http://www.honestjoh...mass-flywheels/

....

My attention was caught by this line re the suspected cause of flywheel failure "What seems to happen is excess temperature from drivers riding their clutches affects the compound.".

It looks like sympathetic driving may help a lot - using the handbrake and not sitting on traffic lights on slopes with the car rocking back and forth as the driver rides the clutch.

I bought my turbo diesel motor from new and have always driven it 'properly' as it's mine and I'll be faced with any repair bills. I'd think twice before buying an ex company hack though, as in my experience they tend to get hammered by 20 something sales reps and the like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I bought my turbo diesel motor from new and have always driven it 'properly' as it's mine and I'll be faced with any repair bills. I'd think twice before buying an ex company hack though, as in my experience they tend to get hammered by 20 something sales reps and the like.

Most people have no clue or desire to drive/maintain a car properly. Seen many perfectly good little cars run into the ground for the sake of an oil top up or a little mechanical sympathy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most people have no clue or desire to drive/maintain a car properly. Seen many perfectly good little cars run into the ground for the sake of an oil top up or a little mechanical sympathy!

I'm seeing loads more cars going around spewing out blue/black smoke these days compared to a couple of decades ago. It's also the same with looking after the bodywork. My mothers 20 year old escort had no rust when she sold it, thanks to regular washes, yet the other day I saw a 56 plate fiesta with rusty seals!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My attention was caught by this line re the suspected cause of flywheel failure "What seems to happen is excess temperature from drivers riding their clutches affects the compound.".

It looks like sympathetic driving may help a lot - using the handbrake and not sitting on traffic lights on slopes with the car rocking back and forth as the driver rides the clutch.

I bought my turbo diesel motor from new and have always driven it 'properly' as it's mine and I'll be faced with any repair bills. I'd think twice before buying an ex company hack though, as in my experience they tend to get hammered by 20 something sales reps and the like.

My wife has a habit of proudly announcing that she is holding the car on the clutch.. on a steep hill.. as a slight burning-hair smell fills the cabin.. Not something I plan to do a lot. Of course, if your handbrake dosen't hold the car on anything more than a 1-in-50 slope then matters are complicated...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm seeing loads more cars going around spewing out blue/black smoke these days compared to a couple of decades ago. It's also the same with looking after the bodywork. My mothers 20 year old escort had no rust when she sold it, thanks to regular washes, yet the other day I saw a 56 plate fiesta with rusty seals!

And that's WITH modern materials and design! Yet these idiots still manage to ruin them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only ever seen it on diesels.

Bumper repair and clutch might set you back a bit at a dealer but would be no problem to a lot of DIY mechanics.

Unless you abuse it yourself I'm never sure it's worth changing a car in for a newer used which is always, to a degree, an unknown quantity.

Agreed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm seeing loads more cars going around spewing out blue/black smoke these days compared to a couple of decades ago. It's also the same with looking after the bodywork. My mothers 20 year old escort had no rust when she sold it, thanks to regular washes, yet the other day I saw a 56 plate fiesta with rusty seals!

A cold snowy winter when a load of road salt's been chucked down and doesn't get washed off can quickly start even the newest cars rusting - a god send for the motor industry though.

My wife has a habit of proudly announcing that she is holding the car on the clutch.. on a steep hill.. as a slight burning-hair smell fills the cabin.. Not something I plan to do a lot. Of course, if your handbrake dosen't hold the car on anything more than a 1-in-50 slope then matters are complicated...

Handbrake problem won't be anything major try depressing the footbrake and pulling the handbrake on - if the handbrake lever travel is much shorter than usual it'll just need new brake shoes.

Also if you want to apply a good handbrake (particularly useful for women) rather than just depressing the footbrake sufficiently to hold the car depress it as hard as you can and hold it before giving the handbrake a good yank.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A cold snowy winter when a load of road salt's been chucked down and doesn't get washed off can quickly start even the newest cars rusting - a god send for the motor industry though.

Often amazed in winter by the people at the jet wash who concentrate exclusively on the tops of their cars, I wonder if they look at me with the same feeling as I spend most of the time on the underside. My two are 1996 and 1997 vintages, still going strong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Often amazed in winter by the people at the jet wash who concentrate exclusively on the tops of their cars, I wonder if they look at me with the same feeling as I spend most of the time on the underside. My two are 1996 and 1997 vintages, still going strong.

Yep, laying on the cold drive until the water runs clear off the bottom of my car is a necessary but unfavourite post winter chore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Handbrake problem won't be anything major try depressing the footbrake and pulling the handbrake on - if the handbrake lever travel is much shorter than usual it'll just need new brake shoes.

Also if you want to apply a good handbrake (particularly useful for women) rather than just depressing the footbrake sufficiently to hold the car depress it as hard as you can and hold it before giving the handbrake a good yank.

My mechanic says otherwise - and he doesn't do unnecessary work (unlike some I've known..). Basically told me to trade it in after the last MOT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if it's just me, but I find it near impossible to find a used diesel with any decent mileage.

Looked at some 09 tdci Fiestas in the garage near my work. Not much change from £10k yet all already had > 60k on the clock!?!

No wonder they're not shifting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if it's just me, but I find it near impossible to find a used diesel with any decent mileage.

Looked at some 09 tdci Fiestas in the garage near my work. Not much change from £10k yet all already had > 60k on the clock!?!

No wonder they're not shifting.

Probably better off with the petrol with fiestas, there's not that much difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Older,bigger engined stuff is just totally unsaleable.I had a girl in at the weekend with a 99T reg Golf GTi,quite nice and a couple of years ago would be worth £3k. Today I would most likely have to take it to the yard and accept £200.She wanted to buy a small engined cheap to run car.I had an 03 Astra Diesel at £1495 but I don't want the GTi unless its £200.

I went to have a look at a VW Phaeton 3.2 (petrol) 4motion last week, 2005 on a 54 plate and 49K miles. A really lovely car though rather underpowered (i'd prefer the 4.2) and not much extra had been ticked on the options list (parkings sensors and bluetooth phone). However, it did look brand new and in a good exterior/interior colour combo.

Main dealer VW garage was asking £13,000 for it (with a years full warranty).

Waddaya reckon? From what little research i've done I reckon it's about £2,000 overpriced.

Told the salesman I thought it was a lovely car but overpriced, he said he couldn't negotiate on the price and so I walked away.

Today i've had a text message, an email and two voice mail messages from the salesman asking me to call him as he's got some "good news" about the Phaeton.

What do you think something like this should sell for?

I'm going to look at a Phaeton 4.2 on Saturday, higher miles, not as nice colours but it's 1 owner FSH and has all the toys but only £7,500.

It's a 280 mile round trip drive to see it and they've assured me it's not cr4p. It'd better not be!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.