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Labor Force Participation Rate Drops To Fresh 25 Year Low: 64.1%

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http://www.zerohedge...25-year-low-641

What a beautiful graph 25 years of "progress" wiped out by globalisation.

Maybe we will be heading back to where only one person in the household will work.

The butler? I suspect so................

2985027117_7f13499782.jpg

Edited by Red Karma

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LFP%20June.jpg

What a beautiful graph 25 years of "progress" wiped out by globalisation.

Certainly paints a picture.. I'm surprised we're not deeper than the recession of the 80s TBH.

Don't think you can blame globalisation though.. it's been going on over that entire period.

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Not to worry the private sector will create more jobs and unemployment is falling (the economically inactive are not unemployed).

...until the money runs out. ;)

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Globalisation + short term monetary policy meddling - mayhem.

mayhem, maihem [ˈmeɪhɛm]

n

1. (Law) Law the wilful and unlawful infliction of injury upon a person, esp (formerly) the injuring or removing of a limb rendering him less capable of defending himself against attack

2. any violent destruction or confusion

Edited by OnlyMe

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Interesting that the participation chart changes direction and heads downwards almost exactly around year 2000 at the start of the new millennium.

As if it had been planned to happen around that date.

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Interesting that the participation chart changes direction and heads downwards almost exactly around year 2000 at the start of the new millennium.

As if it had been planned to happen around that date.

its just thats when the depression started, when the Nasdaq popped, everything since then has been credit andmonetary inflation to try to hide it ultimately making it deeper and deeper, a self fulfilling prophecy that will make it as deep and technically disasterous as possible much the same as the debt cycle that preceeded it has been self fulfilling in making it is high and technically prosperous as possible.

dj-lt-infl.gif

Edited by georgia o'keeffe

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What a beautiful graph 25 years of "progress" wiped out by globalisation.

Maybe we will be heading back to where only one person in the household will work.

So it rose and dropped 3%....not exactly mind blowing

Edited by GinAndPlatonic

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What a beautiful graph 25 years of "progress" wiped out by globalisation.

Maybe we will be heading back to where only one person in the household will work.

globalisation?

******** - regulation regulation regulation coupled with high welfare payments making it not worth taking a low paid job, then high taxes making it not viable to offer a low paid job.

over encouragement of people to go on to higher education, an ageing population.

Goergia is spot on with the fact that this all started 10 years ago, we were just living on borrowed time.

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3% of the US population is roughly 10 million people ....

mmm thats a headline grabbing number.

For 20 of those 25 years covered in the graph,employment was above 66%, so that figure of 10 million is a statistic that really doesn`t say anything meaningful.

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globalisation?

******** - regulation regulation regulation coupled with high welfare payments making it not worth taking a low paid job, then high taxes making it not viable to offer a low paid job.

over encouragement of people to go on to higher education, an ageing population.

Goergia is spot on with the fact that this all started 10 years ago, we were just living on borrowed time.

Exactly to which welfare payments are you referring? And what taxes? This is the US we're talking about where if you're an able-bodied adult the only welfare you'll receive is box of food from the local soup kitchen (if you're lucky). There simply aren't enough jobs in the US -- the direct result of the globalization policies that enrich the elite at the expense of everyone else.

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Exactly to which welfare payments are you referring? And what taxes? This is the US we're talking about where if you're an able-bodied adult the only welfare you'll receive is box of food from the local soup kitchen (if you're lucky). There simply aren't enough jobs in the US -- the direct result of the globalization policies that enrich the elite at the expense of everyone else.

I think some posters are talking from UK and others from a USA perspective....

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Is the outsourcing of labour a temporary phenomena (medium rather than long-term)? There are, at the end of the day, a finite number of people in the world. How many more could really do jobs from the West? Wage inflation in China is rocketing, so production is being moved to places like Vietnam, which has a much smaller population. India has more room to grow in this area, but the entrenched caste system is keeping hundreds of millions of people out of access to such jobs. I don't see much of Africa taking up any spare capacity either

EDIT TO ADD: Having clothes, toys and cheap electronic stuff made half a world away doesn't make much sense in a high oil price environment either.

Edited by rantnrave

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globalisation?

******** - regulation regulation regulation coupled with high welfare payments making it not worth taking a low paid job, then high taxes making it not viable to offer a low paid job.

over encouragement of people to go on to higher education, an ageing population.

Goergia is spot on with the fact that this all started 10 years ago, we were just living on borrowed time.

WTO NEWS: 2001 PRESS RELEASESPress/243

17 September 2001

WTO successfully concludes negotiations on China's entry

The World Trade Organization today (17 September) successfully concluded negotiations on China's terms of membership of the WTO, paving the way for the text of the agreement to be adopted formally at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar, in November.

http://www.wto.org/e...1_e/pr243_e.htm

This next chart is a chart of the global reserve currency - the USD index - since 2000.

Obviously one could replace that with charts showing the opposite effect of commodity prices gradually rising as the global currency is expanded through new US debt creation to facilitate China's entry into the WTO and the expansion of their export industries. Those same dollars of course that they then re-lent to the US (and which caused the housing bubble) in order to maintain their currency peg (i.e. buy buying dollars and printing renminbi - domestic money suppy). The other impact around that date of course is the birth of the Euro as a growing alternative to the dollar but I suspect that to have had a far lesser impact.

http://stockcharts.com/def/servlet/SC.pnf?chart=$usd,PLTADANRBO

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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