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flyingscotsman

Garage Converted To Kitchen Has Flat Roof

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Hi

The property we are interested in has a built in garage that has been converted to a kitchen.

The garage looks very similar to those on this street:

hope this link works - should be a row of houses with flat roofed garages

We are having the house we are purchasing surveyed and will also personally inspect it to see if I can see anything obvious that doesn't look right.

Just wondered if anyone on here would concern themselves with this type of roof.

There are a lot of house in the street I have linked to above with such roofs and the property we are looking at in another town has many houses with similar roofs.

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Got a flat roof on my bathroom, no problem with that.

But then I didn't buy the house with tonnes of mortgage leverage just prior to a massive HPC, so at worst all I could expect was a leak that might cost a few hundred quid to fix (which luckily hasn't happened), rather then a huge capital loss and probable nequity.

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Thanks GC - that gives me some measure of comfort.

It looks like the roof of the garage of the house we are buying has a pitch of about 6 inches from right to left as you look at it head on. There is a gutter and drain pipe on the left side to take away rainwater.

Anyone know if there is a minimum pitch height at which a roof is no longer considered flat?

One of the other reasons I ask is that my wife was getting a quote for building insurance and of course they ask if there is any part of the building that has a flat roof. They also ask for overall percentage of the total roofing that is flat.

The main part of the house has the normal roof as it is a semi-detached bunglow and I would say that the garage roof takes up approx 1/5th of the total roof surface area.

Just wondering if we can avoid adding to the insurance costs by declaring that there is no flat roof if a 6 inch pitch would clear this.

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Thanks GC - that gives me some measure of comfort.

It looks like the roof of the garage of the house we are buying has a pitch of about 6 inches from right to left as you look at it head on. There is a gutter and drain pipe on the left side to take away rainwater.

Anyone know if there is a minimum pitch height at which a roof is no longer considered flat?

One of the other reasons I ask is that my wife was getting a quote for building insurance and of course they ask if there is any part of the building that has a flat roof. They also ask for overall percentage of the total roofing that is flat.

The main part of the house has the normal roof as it is a semi-detached bunglow and I would say that the garage roof takes up approx 1/5th of the total roof surface area.

Just wondering if we can avoid adding to the insurance costs by declaring that there is no flat roof if a 6 inch pitch would clear this.

My flat roof is about 20% of the roof total, I told the insurer this and they said it made no odds. Get your insurance via moneysupermarket, best way to compare. My policy is with Sheila's Wheels believe it or not, cost less than my car insurance (which is dirt cheap too) and is for unlimited cover, so no need to shell out 200 quid to get the place valued for rebuild costs by a surveyor.

But still, are you sure you want to buy now?! I feel we are on the cusp of great things (if you wait!).

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Thanks GC - that gives me some measure of comfort.

It looks like the roof of the garage of the house we are buying has a pitch of about 6 inches from right to left as you look at it head on. There is a gutter and drain pipe on the left side to take away rainwater.

Anyone know if there is a minimum pitch height at which a roof is no longer considered flat?

One of the other reasons I ask is that my wife was getting a quote for building insurance and of course they ask if there is any part of the building that has a flat roof. They also ask for overall percentage of the total roofing that is flat.

The main part of the house has the normal roof as it is a semi-detached bunglow and I would say that the garage roof takes up approx 1/5th of the total roof surface area.

Just wondering if we can avoid adding to the insurance costs by declaring that there is no flat roof if a 6 inch pitch would clear this.

Pretty sure Romans discovered that building irrigation channels, drains, and watersupplies with a gradient of 1:50 meant they could cover the most distance without risk of the flow of water stopping.

Which translates into water not sitting on your roof if it has a 1:50 slope on it.

Doubt insurance companies use the same criteria, though

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I would be more concerned about the insulation and damp proofing if a garage was converted into a kitchen. Garages just have brick walls with no cavity. Also houses have a damp-proof membrane but do garages? (I'm not a builder so not sure) I would be wanting answers to these questions:

Has the bare brick just been plastered or have they added some internal insulation between the brick if they have plasterboarded it?

Has any additional insulation been added in the walls/ceiling/floor?

Is there a damp proof membrane?

Also garage floors are at ground level, but the house floor is usually higher than ground level. Do you step down into the kitchen or is the flooring level with the rest of the house?

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Just to add to the other comments, you will need to make sure that the owners have a building warrant (and possibly planning permission??) for the change of use from garage to a habitable room. This is the sort of thing your solicitor should pick up omn.

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