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Phone Hacking

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In my naive world, i would have thought that hacking someone`s phone, would require input from the phone networks. Obviously not. So how do they do it?

...if people do not protect their voicemail with a password or leave the default ...bit like facebook...then they're in.... :rolleyes:

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In my naive world, i would have thought that hacking someone`s phone, would require input from the phone networks. Obviously not. So how do they do it?

They spoof the incoming caller ID and then either try the default PIN for the network or cycle through PINs until they hit the right one. Easy.

Some networks allow you to call in from another phone so they don't even need to spoof the caller ID in that case.

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As I understand it if you don't specify your own PIN in Voicemail it WAS set to a default value. If you ring someone and get their voicemail you can usually press # and it wil ask for the PIN, if it's still a default value (1111, 1234 for example) then you can get/guess access. This is to allow you to be able to get your voicemail if you have left your phone at home for example but clearly it has been abused. You may have seen the same thing historically if you call voicemail whilst overseas, in that it would ask for a PIN before letting you into your voicemails, as your home network couldn't tell it was 'you' ringing in when you were on a third party network.

I believe that a lot of networks now force you to define a PIN when you first log in these days. Also I'd assume (although I have no knowledge) that there will be some fraud triggers set up now to log any failed attempts to access this way (getting the PIN wrong) as well as logging the originating number for all remote access. I'd doubt any journos would be stupid enough to try and do this now but given it's now in the public conciousness I can imagine some idiots trying it on friends/former partners etc so the problem hasn't gone away.

You can try it yourself. Ring yourself, go to Voicemail and press # and see what happens...

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As I understand it if you don't specify your own PIN in Voicemail it WAS set to a default value. If you ring someone and get their voicemail you can usually press # and it wil ask for the PIN, if it's still a default value (1111, 1234 for example) then you can get/guess access. This is to allow you to be able to get your voicemail if you have left your phone at home for example but clearly it has been abused. You may have seen the same thing historically if you call voicemail whilst overseas, in that it would ask for a PIN before letting you into your voicemails, as your home network couldn't tell it was 'you' ringing in when you were on a third party network.

I believe that a lot of networks now force you to define a PIN when you first log in these days. Also I'd assume (although I have no knowledge) that there will be some fraud triggers set up now to log any failed attempts to access this way (getting the PIN wrong) as well as logging the originating number for all remote access. I'd doubt any journos would be stupid enough to try and do this now but given it's now in the public conciousness I can imagine some idiots trying it on friends/former partners etc so the problem hasn't gone away.

You can try it yourself. Ring yourself, go to Voicemail and press # and see what happens...

...like all technology it's difficult to be fully idiot proof ....but there should be a safegurd by the mobile companies / manufacturers to block voicemail until a personal pin is input and defaults should be banned..... :rolleyes:

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...like all technology it's difficult to be fully idiot proof ....but there should be a safegurd by the mobile companies / manufacturers to block voicemail until a personal pin is input and defaults should be banned..... :rolleyes:

Not being a mobile phone user I've no idea how long the PINs are but if they're only 4 digits long it'll be pretty easy to brute force into it unless it refuses to do anything else after a few failed guesses.

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unless it refuses to do anything else after a few failed guesses.

....most systems e.g. online banking do this...but it could be made a legal requirement that say six digits with a mix of alpha and numeric required....

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we once heard the neighbours cordless phone over a baby monitor.

Cool - now you can graduate to eavesdropping on RFID (contactless) devices with kit that costs less than £50. Is nothing safe????

Here's the linky-link: Eavesdropping Attacks on RFID devices

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any filth? B)

We had one of those a few years back. Next door also. They made us laugh quite a bit once it came to about 10.30PM :D

Was better than the telly most nights !!! B)

Ended up turning it off as we couldn't hear our kid for the "interference".

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We had one of those a few years back. Next door also. They made us laugh quite a bit once it came to about 10.30PM :D

Was better than the telly most nights !!! B)

Ended up turning it off as we couldn't hear our kid for the "interference".

Used to have an analogue cordless phone that got picked up by the radio :/

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They spoof the incoming caller ID and then either try the default PIN for the network or cycle through PINs until they hit the right one. Easy.

Some networks allow you to call in from another phone so they don't even need to spoof the caller ID in that case.

You cannot fool your own network with a spoofed ID. The network will always know the real ID of the phone (or in the case of a mobile call, the SIM) connecting the call (otherwise it couldn't bill you).

It is only possible to spoof the number that is presented to the terminating network/phone.

tim

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I get the impression nothing is safe in the internet age.

And the govt want more of our data to lose.

Well, liebourballs did.

Amen to that!

Again, and again, we're told by the 'powers that be' that this database is safe, and that database cannot be hacked, cracked or 'jacked'; whatever the terminology is? But surprise, surprise, 9 out of 10 times these so-called 'secure' databases prove leaky.

I was staggered to find the true extent of the problem, which can be seen in all its full glory at the following blog:

A decade of database hacking and potential ID theft

From the NHS, to Lockheed Martin Corp., European Space Agency, JP Morgan, Sony, Mastercard to David Beckham - it's a roll-call of the rich, powerful and famous!

Will they ever learn???

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The bottom line is. Who are the hackers?

The millions of low paid individuals who use IT in one way or another for their work all around the world.

They are all exposed to the very data their paymasters sometimes wish to keep secret.

The data at their disposal if made public could topple businesses, govts even.

Wikileaks might have stalled but it doesnt stop the individual finding new outlets.

Transparency and honesty is the only way forward for a healthy society. :)

As David Emm once famously said in the context of database security, "..the weakest link is always the individual."

How right he is!

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The bottom line is. Who are the hackers?

I think that there are more foreign governments and agents involved than spotty teenagers in their bedrooms.

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...if people do not protect their voicemail with a password or leave the default ...bit like facebook...then they're in.... :rolleyes:

In the case of the NOTW, this is the correc answer.

The "crime" is akin to trespass. Which is not a crime. It involves looking through an unlocked, open door. So make sure you don't do any of that during the summer.

Funnily enough, celebs and politicians seem uniquely incapable of passwording their voicemail.

You'd think that extra-marital shaggers like Prescott and Grant would be on their guard, or better still, just be happy they are both successful and hitched.

Still, now NOTW is closing we can all look forward to papers full of seemingly perfect, anodyne celebs, like Elvis and Monroe, who only reveal their true selves in the modus operandi of their suicides.

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Amen to that!

Again, and again, we're told by the 'powers that be' that this database is safe, and that database cannot be hacked, cracked or 'jacked'; whatever the terminology is? But surprise, surprise, 9 out of 10 times these so-called 'secure' databases prove leaky.

I was staggered to find the true extent of the problem, which can be seen in all its full glory at the following blog:

A decade of database hacking and potential ID theft

From the NHS, to Lockheed Martin Corp., European Space Agency, JP Morgan, Sony, Mastercard to David Beckham - it's a roll-call of the rich, powerful and famous!

Will they ever learn???

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Transparency and honesty is the only way forward for a healthy society. :)

but presumably not when it concerns celebs?

As you say re phone hacking:

Glad to see Hugh Grant sticking his oar in on this. More people need to stand up and be counted imo.

Correct me if I'm wrong but Grant has held a grudge against the media ever since he lost Hurley due to his shagging of LA crack whores.

Can't really understand the stance you are taking. Are you for hacking or against it? For NOTW or against it?

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A great find - sums it up brilliantly.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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