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Average Annual House Maintenance Costs

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As I see it, there are at several lots of house maintenance costs to consider if you are going to compare renting with buying.

1. There's the major items house delapidation - eventually, the doors, windows, wiring, roof, etc. will need replaced;

2. Major household fitting, such as carpets, decoration, bathrooms, kitchens, etc.

3. There's also "true" maintenance costs - such as getting someone in to blast the driveway each year, clean the guttering, external painting, etc.

4. There's the "included items" that must be repaired / replaced, such as boilers, fridge / freezers, ovens, etc.

5. There are other costs that could become quite major, but are quite dependent on the original build quality of the structure, and might be insurable against: subsidence, flood, fire, poor quality workmanship (remember that house the other week where the new owners found it was made of 125 year old concrete that had all the qualities of soft mud?);

6. Which leads to: Insurance costs!

I appreciate that there will be many people who come on here and dismiss some of the costs as trivial, and owners who come on and say that they've not spent a penny on their mansion in the last 100 years, however these are either (1) lying; or (2) been very lucky, or (3) in denial, or (4)

You might argue that a new kitchen / bathroom is not relevant for the upkeep of a house, and I'd agree. However, when it comes to sale time, buyers certainly will factor in the cost of replacement of these, so if you have a good one in then it can help maintain the sale price of a house. I would therefore argue that a modern, up to date kitchen / bathroom affaects house price, and must be factored in when considering overall maintenance costs.

I wouldn't be surprised if the long term maintenance cost is in the region of £2,000 - £5,000 per annum.

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As I see it, there are at several lots of house maintenance costs to consider if you are going to compare renting with buying.

1. There's the major items house delapidation - eventually, the doors, windows, wiring, roof, etc. will need replaced;

2. Major household fitting, such as carpets, decoration, bathrooms, kitchens, etc. Landlords guidelines I read said new kitchen every 5 years, new bathroom every 7 - preusmably to keep tenants happy/rents up

3. There's also "true" maintenance costs - such as getting someone in to blast the driveway each year, clean the guttering, external painting, etc. That's what your weekends are for.

4. There's the "included items" that must be repaired / replaced, such as boilers, fridge / freezers, ovens, etc. You missed off boiler servicing.

5. There are other costs that could become quite major, but are quite dependent on the original build quality of the structure, and might be insurable against: subsidence, flood, fire, poor quality workmanship (remember that house the other week where the new owners found it was made of 125 year old concrete that had all the qualities of soft mud?);

6. Which leads to: Insurance costs!

I appreciate that there will be many people who come on here and dismiss some of the costs as trivial, and owners who come on and say that they've not spent a penny on their mansion in the last 100 years, however these are either (1) lying; or (2) been very lucky, or (3) in denial, or (4)

You might argue that a new kitchen / bathroom is not relevant for the upkeep of a house, and I'd agree. However, when it comes to sale time, buyers certainly will factor in the cost of replacement of these, so if you have a good one in then it can help maintain the sale price of a house. I would therefore argue that a modern, up to date kitchen / bathroom affaects house price, and must be factored in when considering overall maintenance costs. Don't waste money replacing kitchens - develope premium means some idiot would want to renovatre and make a profit.

I wouldn't be surprised if the long term maintenance cost is in the region of £2,000 - £5,000 per annum.

It is the biggest asset you'll ever own though.

Some of the points you make would be like buying a car and expecting it to not need any petrol for the next 20 years.

And cars need repairs, servicing, new tyres, windscreens etc.

Edited by SarahBell

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My parents have spent in 13 years about £25-30k on their house

the house is a 1960's ex council house Mid Terrace, 3 Bed. house was purchased in May 1998 for £58k

this includes

New bathroom suite and decoration

New kitchen complete

Redecorate all other rooms and hall (some rooms twice)

replace all external doors and windows for UPVC

Replace all internal doors and door furniture

Replaced Gas Boiler

Replaced some light fittings

Replaced ALL white goods

most of the labour done by my old man

General maintenece was dont by my old man, he cleans the gutters, "blasts" the drive etc

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You need to make the distinction between maintenance and improvement. A great many of the costs are not really essential, but desirable.

I thought I did - improvements that are required in order to maintain the value of the house. A 50 year old bathroom or kitchen will detract from the saleable price tag of the house.

But I'd also add - improvements when renting are easy - just ask the landlord, or move to somewhere better. There are no improvement costs when renting, so you could argue that you need to include them in any renting / buying comparison.

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I thought I did - improvements that are required in order to maintain the value of the house. A 50 year old bathroom or kitchen will detract from the saleable price tag of the house.

But I'd also add - improvements when renting are easy - just ask the landlord, or move to somewhere better. There are no improvement costs when renting, so you could argue that you need to include them in any renting / buying comparison.

There are inherent improvement costs when renting- a house with a 50 year old bathroom will be cheaper to rent as well.

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There are inherent improvement costs when renting- a house with a 50 year old bathroom will be cheaper to rent as well.

Agreed, so there is an effective cost to the owner by not improving the property. What I'm trying to find out is how much the average house will cost in maintenance / repair over its lifetime to maintain its value (relative to similar properties - HPI/HPC excluded, ofc).

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As I see it, there are at several lots of house maintenance costs to consider if you are going to compare renting with buying.

1. There's the major items house delapidation - eventually, the doors, windows, wiring, roof, etc. will need replaced;

2. Major household fitting, such as carpets, decoration, bathrooms, kitchens, etc.

3. There's also "true" maintenance costs - such as getting someone in to blast the driveway each year, clean the guttering, external painting, etc.

4. There's the "included items" that must be repaired / replaced, such as boilers, fridge / freezers, ovens, etc.

5. There are other costs that could become quite major, but are quite dependent on the original build quality of the structure, and might be insurable against: subsidence, flood, fire, poor quality workmanship (remember that house the other week where the new owners found it was made of 125 year old concrete that had all the qualities of soft mud?);

6. Which leads to: Insurance costs!

I appreciate that there will be many people who come on here and dismiss some of the costs as trivial, and owners who come on and say that they've not spent a penny on their mansion in the last 100 years, however these are either (1) lying; or (2) been very lucky, or (3) in denial, or (4)

You might argue that a new kitchen / bathroom is not relevant for the upkeep of a house, and I'd agree. However, when it comes to sale time, buyers certainly will factor in the cost of replacement of these, so if you have a good one in then it can help maintain the sale price of a house. I would therefore argue that a modern, up to date kitchen / bathroom affaects house price, and must be factored in when considering overall maintenance costs.

I wouldn't be surprised if the long term maintenance cost is in the region of £2,000 - £5,000 per annum.

Renters also pay for home improvements and renovations too. Before you all say 'not me', we all do.

Imagine there are two houses in a street, one re-furbished, one not. The rent price will reflect this.

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I wouldn't be surprised if the long term maintenance cost is in the region of £2,000 - £5,000 per annum.

Should be easy. I assume you are renting? Look at what your landlord done in your rented property, make an estimate based on this.

The average time spent in a property is fairly short (7 years perhaps?) and you need to be pretty unlucky to have to replace doors/windows/roof in that time. So I would guess the AVERAGE is probably around £1-2k per annum, including building insurance costs.

Of course if your buying somewhere that needs major work, as has been mentioned, you'll factor this cost into the price you offer.

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Agreed, so there is an effective cost to the owner by not improving the property. What I'm trying to find out is how much the average house will cost in maintenance / repair over its lifetime to maintain its value (relative to similar properties - HPI/HPC excluded, ofc).

The cost of making improvements to a house will be the same regardless of whether it's owner occupied or rented out.

The cost needs to be paid by someone, in most cases, it is the person living there, ie the owner, or the tenant, by increased rent.

Both the tenant and the owner-occupier have a choice whether to live in a poorly- maintained, or a well- maintained place.

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Of course if your buying somewhere that needs major work, as has been mentioned, you'll factor this cost into the price you offer.

So this cost is a cost to the homeowner - either the incoming one, or to the outgoing one. The replacement (roof, windows, whatever) are paid for somewhere. And they eventually have to be done (or risk getting even greater structural damage).

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Some quite large costs may never materialise. A good quality slate roof should last over 100 years so if it's an old house and has been recently re-roofed it won't be something to worry about.

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Some quite large costs may never materialise. A good quality slate roof should last over 100 years so if it's an old house and has been recently re-roofed it won't be something to worry about.

All maintenance costs will eventually materialise.

I'm talking about the average, not the particular. the annual slate roof maintenance cost is therefore the cost of a new slate roof divided by 100. The cost of other roofs can similarly be worked out. These annual costs can be then averaged to gether in proportion to the ratio of slate roof / non-slate roof houses.

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On average, over the long term, taking into account all the varibles, I would guesstimate it to be somewhere between £50/year and £5000/year depending on your tastes and botheredness.

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On average, over the long term, taking into account all the varibles, I would guesstimate it to be somewhere between £50/year and £5000/year depending on your tastes and botheredness.

£50 a year? really? what planet are you living on? To take an extremely low calculation on one rare occurence: lets say a new slate roof every 100 years = £20,000 (?) £20,000 / 100 years = £200 per year as a cost (that's not including the odd slate repair that needs done in the meantime) Four times your minimum estimate. That's not taking into account any of the other costs.

Don't forget, when the time comes to sell, the state of disrepair will be taken into account in your sale price, so there's no getting away from these costs - just delaying them, potentially at the expense of having to do more expensive structural repair.

Taste and botherdness have nothing to do with the calculation.

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Number from a hat: 1% of value pa

Less on a brand new place perhaps, which may justify a premium

That seems like a more reasonable estimate.

So, a £300,000 house is going to cost in the region of £3k in maintenance. Or in the order of £250 per month (long term, of course).

Edited by Lepista

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£50 a year? really? what planet are you living on? To take an extremely low calculation on one rare occurence: lets say a new slate roof every 100 years = £20,000 (?) £20,000 / 100 years = £200 per year as a cost (that's not including the odd slate repair that needs done in the meantime) Four times your minimum estimate. That's not taking into account any of the other costs.

Don't forget, when the time comes to sell, the state of disrepair will be taken into account in your sale price, so there's no getting away from these costs - just delaying them, potentially at the expense of having to do more expensive structural repair.

Taste and botherdness have nothing to do with the calculation.

Of course it does. Some people need a new kitchen every few years some people dont bother for 30 years... or more.

Some like expensive kitchens and some are not bothered.

Ok move my bottom figure up a bit if you like but its still a massive range inbetween.

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Of course it does. Some people need a new kitchen every few years some people dont bother for 30 years... or more.

Some like expensive kitchens and some are not bothered.

Ok move my bottom figure up a bit if you like but its still a massive range inbetween.

What you're suggesting is more likely to push the higher end up massively, not push the lower end down.

Example: lets say a new kitchen & bathroom every 5 years, at a cost of say £10k each. That gives an annual cost of £20k / 5 years, which is £4k per year on average. That's on top of all the other costs that are required for maintenance and repair. seriously, try and put some loball numbers against the following. Just remember - ALL of these need to be done (even if you're penny pinching), all you are considering is lengthening the time period for doing so. Also, some of them you might not do, but at the expense (on average) of causing other, greater, damage). Some of the items you may do yourself, but this is at the expense (compared to a non-home owner) of the loss of your leisure time.

Window replacement

Window repair

Door replacement

Door repair

Roof replacement

Roof repair

Guttering replacement

Guttering repair

Guttering cleaning

Driveway cleaning

Driveway replacement

Driveway repair

Garden maintenance

Garden repair

Shed repair

Shed replacement

Shed maintenance

Boiler Maintenance

Boiler repair

Boiler replacement

Central heating maintenance

Central heating replacement

Central heating repair

White goods repair

White goods replacement

White goods maintenance

Garage roof maintenance

Garage roof repair

Garage roof replacement

Carpet replacement

House Decoration

Kitchen repair

Kitchen Maintenance

Kitchen replacement

Bathroom repair

Bathroom replacement

Bathroom maintenance

Electrical fixtures..

...

Need I go on? 1% p.a. (average, long term) is actually looking a little low to me.

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What you're suggesting is more likely to push the higher end up massively, not push the lower end down.

Example: lets say a new kitchen & bathroom every 5 years, at a cost of say £10k each. That gives an annual cost of £20k / 5 years, which is £4k per year on average. That's on top of all the other costs that are required for maintenance and repair. seriously, try and put some loball numbers against the following. Just remember - ALL of these need to be done (even if you're penny pinching), all you are considering is lengthening the time period for doing so. Also, some of them you might not do, but at the expense (on average) of causing other, greater, damage). Some of the items you may do yourself, but this is at the expense (compared to a non-home owner) of the loss of your leisure time.

Window replacement

Window repair

Door replacement

Door repair

Roof replacement

Roof repair

Guttering replacement

Guttering repair

Guttering cleaning

Driveway cleaning

Driveway replacement

Driveway repair

Garden maintenance

Garden repair

Shed repair

Shed replacement

Shed maintenance

Boiler Maintenance

Boiler repair

Boiler replacement

Central heating maintenance

Central heating replacement

Central heating repair

White goods repair

White goods replacement

White goods maintenance

Garage roof maintenance

Garage roof repair

Garage roof replacement

Carpet replacement

House Decoration

Kitchen repair

Kitchen Maintenance

Kitchen replacement

Bathroom repair

Bathroom replacement

Bathroom maintenance

Electrical fixtures..

...

Need I go on? 1% p.a. (average, long term) is actually looking a little low to me.

Good effort on the list.

I'm just thinking of my old man, he aint spent nothing in 30 years.

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Good effort on the list.

I'm just thinking of my old man, he aint spent nothing in 30 years.

Yeah, and my grandad smoked 80 a day. Never did him any harm.

Do you think your old man is the norm, and/or that he's not storing up problems for the future?

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Of course it does. Some people need a new kitchen every few years some people dont bother for 30 years... or more.

Some like expensive kitchens and some are not bothered.

Ok move my bottom figure up a bit if you like but its still a massive range inbetween.

Correct, when you buy a place you tend towards something doesn't need a new roof, or new electrics etc etc If they needed it then you budget that in the purchase.

On average over the last 5 years I have spent £200 per year. Using maintenance cost as a justification for renting just doesn't hold water, there are plenty of good reasons but this isn't one of them.

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Good effort on the list.

I'm just thinking of my old man, he aint spent nothing in 30 years.

steptoe.jpg

Good thread. Think this is one important thing a lot of people forget about. When people talk about buying or selling their house and 'How much they have made [lost] on it' - they completely ignore all of these costs.

A cost that would not be incurred if you were renting = a cost that has to be included in any calculation.

Simple as that.

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Correct, when you buy a place you tend towards something doesn't need a new roof, or new electrics etc etc If they needed it then you budget that in the purchase.

On average over the last 5 years I have spent £200 per year. Using maintenance cost as a justification for renting just doesn't hold water, there are plenty of good reasons but this isn't one of them.

...So, what do you think happens to those houses that *do* need their roof replacing in the near future? Or do all houses never need roofs replacing?

Sigh, sometimes it's like pulling teeth.

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Correct, when you buy a place you tend towards something doesn't need a new roof, or new electrics etc etc If they needed it then you budget that in the purchase.

On average over the last 5 years I have spent £200 per year. Using maintenance cost as a justification for renting just doesn't hold water, there are plenty of good reasons but this isn't one of them.

Yes but next year you may well be lumped with a bill for £10k. This has to be factored in for any calculation. And when that 10k bill arrives - and it will - then you can go back and pro rata add it into how many years you have lived in the place.

One big repair could mean you 'average' cost of £200 per annum could move up to £1000 per annum in one fell swoop.

I think most people just forget about this stuff because they want to.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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