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Pauly_Boy

Question Time - Hpc Gets Its Voice Heard (Possibly))

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I applied last Thursday when I heard it was going to be in Basingstoke and I got a call this morning, unbelievably I'm going to be on the show even though I said I'm a righty!

So I have to put forward two questions and with this weekends news being about the benefit cuts, it's a good chance to ask something about the £26k limit, obviously it's loads of money to receive for doing nothing but targeting like that isn't great.

What I think I need to ask is something along the lines of ...

- surely it's a sign that housing is massively overpriced in this country when 40000 people having their benefits capped at £26k a year will apparently be unable to afford a home.

- Currently we spend $21bn on housing benefits, the majority of this ends up in the hands of land lords, why doesn't the government make better use of that money and build new housing?

- To earn £26k after tax a normal worker would have to earn almost £35k a year, how can anyone justify that this is not enough money to live on considering it puts the receiver in the top 15% incomes in the country.

- Can we trust politicians to speak their mind after Ed Milibands interview with Damon Green where he gave the same answer to 5 different questions.

Any other suggestions??

Edited by Pauly_Boy

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I applied last Thursday when I heard it was going to be in Basingstoke and I got a call this morning, unbelievably I'm going to be on the show even though I said I'm a righty!

So I have to put forward two questions and with this weekends news being about the benefit cuts, it's a good chance to ask something about the £26k limit, obviously it's loads of money to receive for doing nothing but targeting like that isn't great.

What I think I need to ask is something along the lines of ...

- surely it's a sign that housing is massively overpriced in this country when 40000 people having their benefits capped at £26k a year will apparently be unable to afford a home.

- Currently we spend $21bn on housing benefits, the majority of this ends up in the hands of land lords, why doesn't the government make better use of that money and build new housing?

- To earn £26k after tax a normal worker would have to earn almost £35k a year, how can anyone justify that this is not enough money to live on considering it puts the receiver in the top 15% incomes in the country.

- Can we trust politicians to speak their mind after Ed Milibands interview with Damon Green where he gave the same answer to 5 different questions.

Any other suggestions??

they only ask fairly fixed questions that have been in the recent news.

you need to pretend to ask questions they expect to hear, but change it when you actually get the microphone start talking about that question but tweak it halfway through to what you really want to ask, regarding housing.

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...good question...emphasise the £26,000 is tax free...lots of 'ple will not realise.... :)

Personally, I'd like to ask:

"Is housing benefit of more benefit to landlords or to tenants?"

Perhaps more topically:

"It is said that the benefits cap will cause 40,000 people to be made homeless.

Are public statements of concern about this policy genuine, or do they stem from the fear amongst landlords that they may actually have to lower their rents?"

Or maybe:

"It is said that the benefits cap will cause 40,000 people to be made homeless.

Who should be more concerned about this, the claimants or their landlords?"

Edited by (Blizzard)

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...good question...emphasise the £26,000 is tax free...lots of 'ple will not realise.... :)

True, but I think the main point is that benefits were originally only meant for emergencies, for when you fall on hard times. They were meant to allow someone to feed themselves, now they're being used as permanent lifestyle choice. surely it's wrong that a family on benefits can receive more than a family who are in work. How are those working for minimum wage meant to think?

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If you are going to ask about the benefits cap, I would like to hear a firm assertion from the coalition govt. represenatitive on QT that the govt. are NOT going to do a u-turn on this policy (given all the recent bleating in the press) and have the courage of their conviction to see it through.

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Good for you. I'll be looking for the ostrich in the audience.

It's a Booby, google it, they're beautiful :)

I'm all for the benefits cap, i just hate the way the media are spinning it into a 'poor sole on benefits will be made homeless because they'll only have £26k given to them', when infact it puts them in the top 15% of people based on income as someone would have to earn £35k to get £26k after tax!. However, the £26k in benefits is for a 'family' (however they class that) and the income scale is based on individual income I believe (found it here http://www.ifs.org.uk/wheredoyoufitin/)

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The Overal Benefits Cap (OBC) is yet another spatchcock policy that was never likely to be viable.

'Dunce's cap':

http://www.insidehou...ap/6516471.blog

So what are we to make of a policy that increases homelessness and costs more money? It seems complete nonsense in terms of housing policy and deficit reduction.

We know that Eric Pickles was calling for changes but apparently did not even raise the small matter of spending more money to make 20,000 homeless in Cabinet. We strongly suspect that even Iain Duncan Smith himself is opposed to the cap and the Centre for Social Justice, the think-tank he founded and which dreamt up most of his welfare reform agenda, has called it 'devastating' and 'highly damaging'.

But we also know that the cap was first proposed at the Conservative Party conference by the chancellor George Osborne.

The truth is that this is a political and ideological decision, one based on spurious 'fairness' to 'hard-working families', and the (probably correct) calculation that it will play well with the voters, never mind the blatant lack of evidence and misuse of statistics.

Edited by CrashConnoisseur

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I applied last Thursday when I heard it was going to be in Basingstoke and I got a call this morning, unbelievably I'm going to be on the show even though I said I'm a righty!

So I have to put forward two questions and with this weekends news being about the benefit cuts, it's a good chance to ask something about the £26k limit, obviously it's loads of money to receive for doing nothing but targeting like that isn't great.

What I think I need to ask is something along the lines of ...

- surely it's a sign that housing is massively overpriced in this country when 40000 people having their benefits capped at £26k a year will apparently be unable to afford a home.

- Currently we spend $21bn on housing benefits, the majority of this ends up in the hands of land lords, why doesn't the government make better use of that money and build new housing?

- To earn £26k after tax a normal worker would have to earn almost £35k a year, how can anyone justify that this is not enough money to live on considering it puts the receiver in the top 15% incomes in the country.

- Can we trust politicians to speak their mind after Ed Milibands interview with Damon Green where he gave the same answer to 5 different questions.

Any other suggestions??

Isn't the average wage something like 25k per year, before stoppages?

Therefore, is it right that someone on benefits can be given substantially more than the average worker? Bear in mind that the scrounger gets other goodies like free school meals. Do they pay council tax?

Ask why they are capped way above the average worker.

You could also ask how much longer is the saver going to be robbed by low interest rates just to help the indebted, and allowing inflation to get way above savings rates?

Edited by LetsGetReadyToTumble

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they only ask fairly fixed questions that have been in the recent news.

you need to pretend to ask questions they expect to hear, but change it when you actually get the microphone start talking about that question but tweak it halfway through to what you really want to ask, regarding housing.

...and Dimbers will shut you down in milliseconds laugh.gif

Won't be watching I'm afraid, as I gave up with "Question Time Which Requires A Labour Answer" a long time ago.

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Last week there were 3 lefties, a moderate and one Tory on the panel.

Sounds like a good example of BBC balance to me.

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Good stuff, Pauly_Boy! The programme is useless but every opportunity to get the message across, especially on the BBC, should be embraced with both hands. Good on you for applying and well done for getting picked.

they only ask fairly fixed questions that have been in the recent news.

you need to pretend to ask questions they expect to hear, but change it when you actually get the microphone start talking about that question but tweak it halfway through to what you really want to ask, regarding housing.

+1

This is the only way to get the message across in the media: surprise. Throw them a curve ball. Weave it in. Whatever you do, don't reveal your intentions, thoughts or opinions in advance because they'll stop you from expressing them. Don't make your comments unrelated to the issue being discussed because they'll simply dismiss it. I'm guessing you know all this already though. :) I think you can pretty much bring every current issue back to HPC and the housing agenda (except of course for the recent and thoroughly despicable alleged offence in the NoW phone hacking scandal - hasn't that poor family suffered enough?).

Financial and economic problems? Banks lending irresponsibly, consumers spending irresponsibly, investment tied up in unproductive property rather than productive economy, no one has money to spend because of fraudulently inflated housing costs and too high rents eating up much of their disposable income.

Social problems? Both parents having to work full time jobs to make ends meet because of too high housing costs and rents leading to generation of kids feeling isolated or abandoned / getting into trouble through absence of heads that have eyes in the back of them / being spoilt ("treats" / electronics / TV and DVD / video games) by guilty parents wanting to over-compensate. Whatever issues relating to kids - bullying, feelings of inadequacy, square eyes, fat - you can bring back to this.

Crime? Neighbourhoods and communities no longer exist because of BTL. No neighbourhood watch or sense of "together". Streets up and down the country where most residents are on AST agreements: new neighbours potentially every 6 months. Strangers all around you, friendships and relationships don't get time/chance to develop, no-one to ask to watch your house while away, no one to watch your kids / tell them off when you aren't looking (no one for your children to go out and play with because their new friend might be gone in a year or so - back to social problems). No one to invest time and effort into making the area good and safe (not the person who only lives there for 6 months and certainly not the person who bought it as an "investment" and doesn't care about the house or area as long as the money keeps coming in). BTL and vacant second homes have destroyed communities. Communities prevent crime.

IMO, when it comes to the big issues and problems in the UK I think pretty much every single one of them can be brought back to the housing crisis / property boom - and there's a reason for this: it's true.

Edited by GordonBrownSpentMyFuture

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Good stuff, Pauly_Boy! The programme is useless but every opportunity to get the message across, especially on the BBC, should be embraced with both hands. Good on you for applying and well done for getting picked.

Delusional. You won't be called, won't be asked and if they do will make you look like a rabid right wing loony.

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Personally, I'd like to ask:

"It is said that the benefits cap will cause 40,000 people to be made homeless.

Who should be more concerned about this, the claimants or their landlords?"

Brilliant!

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I applied last Thursday when I heard it was going to be in Basingstoke and I got a call this morning, unbelievably I'm going to be on the show even though I said I'm a righty!

Excellent PB! Well done! And thank you! (for campaigning for "our cause"!) Do carry the flag there!!!

So I have to put forward two questions and with this weekends news being about the benefit cuts, it's a good chance to ask something about the £26k limit, obviously it's loads of money to receive for doing nothing but targeting like that isn't great.

What I think I need to ask is something along the lines of ...

- surely it's a sign that housing is massively overpriced in this country when 40000 people having their benefits capped at £26k a year will apparently be unable to afford a home.

- Currently we spend $21bn on housing benefits, the majority of this ends up in the hands of land lords, why doesn't the government make better use of that money and build new housing?

- To earn £26k after tax a normal worker would have to earn almost £35k a year, how can anyone justify that this is not enough money to live on considering it puts the receiver in the top 15% incomes in the country.

- Can we trust politicians to speak their mind after Ed Milibands interview with Damon Green where he gave the same answer to 5 different questions.

Any other suggestions??

They are all good. It is so difficult to choose just one.

Though I think your best chance will be on a follow-up question. You will have to improvise.

And you'll probably have just 1 chance. At best 2.

I've tried to write a question, but it became too long, trying to pack too much in it:

" The common root of almost all our problems is high property prices. Ian Duncan Smith said in parliament that his department pays for 40% of all the UK private rental market! That is almost half of it all! ((For the numerically challenged)) This huge money injection just pushes rents even higher, benefiting only by-to-let landlords! And keeping property prices up! And until our planning system allows us to build our own homes, we will be trapped. "

See? Too long.

Then I realised that the problem is that we are trying to do the BBC's job. They have all the time, and all the money to do this properly. But alas, they don't. We have realised before that it is not just, or mainly, incompetence. It's probably because most of them own their own (London) properties, and have acquired a natural bias about the topic.

When BBC journalists deal with financial matters they have to declare any interest, but for some inexplicable reason they don't have to when dealing with properties and/or mortgages. Even if this is by far the biggest financial interest in their lives.

And then I thought: Shouldn't we (well, you :P ) try to point this out to them? To ask why BBC journalists don't declare their interests when talking about properties prices?

:)

PS: We had a thread about that here before, and IIRC Hotairmail had a short and to the point suggestion about it. I'll try to find it, and link it here later.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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As our taxes go directly to landlords via housing benefit supported higher rents, who should be worried about 40,000 being made homeless? Renters or landlords?

If you are asked get in that our MPs are now using BTL as an expense fiddle. A 70% increase in MPs with rental income.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/mps-who-own-london-homes-still-claim-rent-2151575.html

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I'm thought you didn't get to ask the question you submit - but someone elses?

I heard the same. I think PB's best chance will be on follow-up questions.

By the way PB, try to say it all in a calm sensible voice, OK? Don't go all JD (aka KB) on them.

( ;) Sorry JD/KB, just kidding. I would probably shout MUCH more if I were on those interviews! )

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Well done PB!!!!

Unfortunately you could ask them to discuss the merits of non-stick frying pans and you will still get the same pre-rehearsed answers (also now known as "doing an Ed").

Wait until you're given the opportunity to respond, and then raise the issue of house prices and thank them for avoiding it in their answers............

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Would a benefits cap be a problem is housing costs were lower?

Do benefits that support high rents actually prevent people from taking up paid employment?

Whilst they acknowledge the need for a cap on benefits will the government U-turn?

Could lower rents reduce the need for a benefit cap?

Would investing the local housing allowance in state built property solve the economic and benefit problems?

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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