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Chugger

Build Your Own Home With Cob

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Cob or cobb or clom (in Wales) is a building material consisting of clay, sand, straw, water, and earth, similar to adobe. Cob is fireproof, resistant to seismic activity, and inexpensive. It can be used to create artistic, sculptural forms and has been revived in recent years by the natural building and sustainability movements.

Some of our oldest buildings still standing proudly are made from Cob. They're strong, well insulated, and can be made using little to no tools or fossil fuels. Will we see people forgoing forking out for newbuilds and going back to these old techniques?

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Cob or cobb or clom (in Wales) is a building material consisting of clay, sand, straw, water, and earth, similar to adobe. Cob is fireproof, resistant to seismic activity, and inexpensive. It can be used to create artistic, sculptural forms and has been revived in recent years by the natural building and sustainability movements.

Some of our oldest buildings still standing proudly are made from Cob. They're strong, well insulated, and can be made using little to no tools or fossil fuels. Will we see people forgoing forking out for newbuilds and going back to these old techniques?

Not until the banks change their position on lending to buy a cob-constructed house.

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I grew up in a farmhouse made out of cob which was listed in the domesday book.

Only issue with that place was it designed for shorter people. :)

That'd suit me...:D

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I grew up in a farmhouse made out of cob which was listed in the domesday book.

Only issue with that place was it designed for shorter people. :)

Surely you get used to it? I lived in a place once (quite a bit more modern than that - might've been 18th century, with a more modern 19th century extension that contained the only horizontal floors and vertical walls in it) where a lot of the doorways came up to mid-nose height on me. Ducking through doors became habit-forming, even if I was elsewhere and there was a couple of feet of space above my head. It was funny how it always became some sort of odd barrier in the mind though - the simple fact that I couldn't walk straight from room to room without a tiny bit of extra effort made it all seem rather odd. Funnily enough more so than in other places. I need to duck through the door to get to the toilets in my local pub, and never even notice that, and having to walk stooped for ages when I poke around in disused mines doesn't have the same effect either (although it is a relief to reach a spot where I can walk normally). Anyway, cease rambling!

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looks great, i'd have that over a shoebox or clonehome (i just made that up btw, use it free of royalties) anyday.

however, the trailer gave no indication that it's loads cheaper or anything, in fact it seemed to advertise as a high end of the market kind of home. :(

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Not until the banks change their position on lending to buy a cob-constructed house.

Check out the ecology bs

(building society rather than just general ecology bs like global warming etc...!)

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looks great, i'd have that over a shoebox or clonehome (i just made that up btw, use it free of royalties) anyday.

however, the trailer gave no indication that it's loads cheaper or anything, in fact it seemed to advertise as a high end of the market kind of home. :(

It's the cheapest way to build a house. Afterall, 30% of the world's population live in them, and that 30% definitely aren't the rich portion.

A documentary on the subject (some of which was filmed in the UK)

Skip to half way through the 3rd video if you want to skip all the examples of native housing in other countries which gets a bit boring.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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