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How Do You Learn Building?

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So the guy across the road has built a bbq after flattening a load of structures and it looks pretty good. I would not have the first clue how to do this and maddeningly I know for a fact it's not rocket science, just a knowledge thing. But where is the best way to aquire this knowledge? It would be useful if I (ever) bought a house. Maybe because I grew up dadless and this kind of thing gets passed on from dad to son when you are younger I don't know, but I really would like to aquire this knowledge. College course? A book? Or just diy, t'internet & trial & error? Who taught you?

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So the guy across the road has built a bbq after flattening a load of structures and it looks pretty good. I would not have the first clue how to do this and maddeningly I know for a fact it's not rocket science, just a knowledge thing. But where is the best way to aquire this knowledge? It would be useful if I (ever) bought a house. Maybe because I grew up dadless and this kind of thing gets passed on from dad to son when you are younger I don't know, but I really would like to aquire this knowledge. College course? A book? Or just diy, t'internet & trial & error? Who taught you?

Bricklaying college nightschool?

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Books, internet, trial and error. Have watched my partner achieve a lot. I am good at refurbing windows and have completely tiled a floor. I can render but not plaster, that is a skill I would want to be shown by a pro.

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My father was an electronics engineer, but was a pretty competent bricklayer. Not very fast, but he wasn't doing it for a living. As a youth I got pretty fit mixing the concrete. Perhaps you just need to find someone that is doing a bit of DIY building and lend a hand? It all seems to start with a decent level concrete base, on top of hardcore on top a dug out base. Keeping everything very level with spirit levels and bits of string. I've not done bricklaying but I'd like to have a go. Looks very therapeutic.

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I remember back in school certain classes apparently only open to the "thickies". There was building, metal work, and wood work. Most kids (including me) were pushed into academic subjects.

Looking back I wish I'd taken one of those options. The subjects I took have had no practical use and bored the crap out of me.

Building is a great skill to have, for home and work. And I imagine it's a very satisfying past time. Very therapeutic to see something appear out of nothing.

No wonder brickies are so self satisfied and cocky :lol:

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You still here?

ok listen, my appointment is in two weeks. Therefore they obviously think I'll make it for two weeks. Thanks for your "concern" :D

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I remember back in school certain classes apparently only open to the "thickies". There was building, metal work, and wood work. Most kids (including me) were pushed into academic subjects.

Looking back I wish I'd taken one of those options. The subjects I took have had no practical use and bored the crap out of me.

Building is a great skill to have, for home and work. And I imagine it's a very satisfying past time. Very therapeutic to see something appear out of nothing.

No wonder brickies are so self satisfied and cocky :lol:

Agree with this. How has learning Mars was the God Of War helped you in your life? I also wished I'd done the cooking course.

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One of the best ways to learn is watch others and then have a go yourelf, starting small and easy to handle projects.

Youtube is a great source of info if you cannot get on site and stand around for ages. Quite a few videos on there are promos for complete coures on DVD, some of which look excellent. There's some really good forums too.

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One of the best ways to learn is watch others and then have a go yourelf, starting small and easy to handle projects.

Youtube is a great source of info if you cannot get on site and stand around for ages. Quite a few videos on there are promos for complete coures on DVD, some of which look excellent. There's some really good forums too.

I think this is the best way but like you say, you need to know someone. It's like anything, you can watch videos, read about it, but there's no substitute for sitting next to Nellie. What could take you an hour of frustrating searching for one solution on the Web or a day or more waiting for a forum reply and then deciphering it's contents, could be sorted in a two minute question and answer session with someone in the know.

edit: Is there an idea for a Website here (if it doesn't already exist)? teacheachother.com?

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I remember back in school certain classes apparently only open to the "thickies". There was building, metal work, and wood work. Most kids (including me) were pushed into academic subjects.

Looking back I wish I'd taken one of those options. The subjects I took have had no practical use and bored the crap out of me.

Building is a great skill to have, for home and work. And I imagine it's a very satisfying past time. Very therapeutic to see something appear out of nothing.

Last week on site we had a wall collapse while the brickies were building it , obviously they built too many courses in one day and a freak gust of wind just blew it over.They were up on the scaffold whilst it was falling over trying to hold it up , like i said to another bloke if it was me and it started falling i would push it away from me , it was a good 3-4 metres fall off the scaffold if the bricks came their way.

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Find a busy local builder and work for a fiver an hour doing donkey work. You'll soon be as fit as a butchers dog and learning the simpler jobs.

I was thinking of doing this maybe at the weekends as long as it doesn't just involve "move that lump of crap from there over to there, repeat", I'd consider this.

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I was thinking of doing this maybe at the weekends as long as it doesn't just involve "move that lump of crap from there over to there, repeat", I'd consider this.

It would definitely involve that. Maybe moving on to drill some holes once the crap had been moved ;-).

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ok listen, my appointment is in two weeks. Therefore they obviously think I'll make it for two weeks. Thanks for your "concern" :D

Not ness a celery,although you will most likely make it Monsieur Homme D'Swartze.OP I think you assume not having a father has too much importance.If I had been your dad your shelves would all have collapsed,although you would most likely make a cracking Coq au Vin.

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Building a brick barbeque is easy as anything. Because it is not load-bearing it can be built directly onto a patio or similar area. If you are building onto soil you need to provide a shallow foundation of compacted rubble. Just dig a trench, pour rubble into it, and bash it down with a lump of wood until it is solid.

Then just lay a layer of mortar (one part cement to three parts sand then add water to make a stiff mix)

Then place bricks on that, one at a time, having smeared a layer of mortar onto the end of the brick which will adjoin the next brick.

Use a long spirit level as you go, tapping the top and side of it to level the bricks, place the next layer on top of the first layer and continue til done.

Use too much mortar so it is squeezed out as you lay each layer, pull off the excess, a spoon will do for this, then smooth the joints with a three-inch cut-off piece of hosepipe, the handle of a screwdriver etc. Place the top layer upside down so rainwater doesn't collect in the frogs (the indent on the top of the brick)

It doesn't matter if it is not millimetre-perfect, in fact a barbeque looks better if it isn't. Rustic, sort of thing.

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I was thinking of doing this maybe at the weekends as long as it doesn't just involve "move that lump of crap from there over to there, repeat", I'd consider this.

It'd also consist of lots of you stood there knackered and them laughing at you.

On a plus note you get rid of your fingerprints if you move enough bricks etc :)

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Building a brick barbeque is easy as anything. Because it is not load-bearing it can be built directly onto a patio or similar area. If you are building onto soil you need to provide a shallow foundation of compacted rubble. Just dig a trench, pour rubble into it, and bash it down with a lump of wood until it is solid.

Then just lay a layer of mortar (one part cement to three parts sand then add water to make a stiff mix)

Then place bricks on that, one at a time, having smeared a layer of mortar onto the end of the brick which will adjoin the next brick.

Use a long spirit level as you go, tapping the top and side of it to level the bricks, place the next layer on top of the first layer and continue til done.

Use too much mortar so it is squeezed out as you lay each layer, pull off the excess, a spoon will do for this, then smooth the joints with a three-inch cut-off piece of hosepipe, the handle of a screwdriver etc. Place the top layer upside down so rainwater doesn't collect in the frogs (the indent on the top of the brick)

It doesn't matter if it is not millimetre-perfect, in fact a barbeque looks better if it isn't. Rustic, sort of thing.

Harry,you make it sound so easy you almost convinced me that I could do it.

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Harry,you make it sound so easy you almost convinced me that I could do it.

As with so much else, it's largely a matter of confidence, but basically if you could build a model of a barbeque out of Lego then you can build a full-size one out of bricks.

It doesn't matter if it goes wrong, it will take longer for the mortar to set than it will take for you to build it so if it does all go wrong you can simply knock it down, scrape the mortar off of the bricks and start again.

Just Googled this, worth a look. http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/barbecue/

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over here they make BBQs by cutting a 44 gallon drum in half lengthways

Bonza!

Yup, easy enough to do. Although, during the first test feast the paint was burning off the drum and smoking the food. Not sure if that's healthy or not.

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Yup, easy enough to do. Although, during the first test feast the paint was burning off the drum and smoking the food. Not sure if that's healthy or not.

Makes me wonder what we ate when my dad used the oil drip tray for the barbecue.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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