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The Ayatollah Buggeri

1Tb Laptop Hard Drives

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Herewith an advance warning for anyone contemplating the purchase of such an object.

Saw one on Fleabay for £70 the other day and decided to go for it, on the grounds that doubling my laptop's hard drive capacity would be extremely useful for when I disappear to Alaska for six weeks in the summer. I have now scanned virtually all my research notes, documents and a couple of hundred out-of-print books to PDF over the last year or so (knackering their spines in the process, but as most of them are from the university library...). There is a super-fast scan facility on the office photocopier (and 400dpi too, so it's not like handwriting etc. is illegible), and combined with Acrobat Pro X (its Clearscan OCR function is amazing - it can even decode my handwriting most of the time!), makes life for an academic who deals with tons of books and papers so much easier. The whole lot is text-searchable as well! I now have about 600-650gb of this scanned material, and thought that just being able to put the whole lot in my laptop was a very enticing prospect.

Well, that idea was swiftly buggered when the thing arrived. It is just too thick - as in, just over a milimeter at most - to fit in my laptop's hard drive compartment. Comparing it with the existing 500gb one, you can clearly see that it's slightly thicker. Presumably there's an extra platter in there. I'd also bought an external caddy into which to stick the displaced old drive. To add insult to injury, the new one wouldn't fit in there, either, until I'd filed down the hooks on the enclosure and now it just will.

So, if anyone is contemplating a laptop hard drive upgrade, beware! For the record, the offending drive is a Samsung 2.5" SATA internal drive, model HM100UI/Z4, and the laptop is an HP DV6910ea. I would strongly advise asking the vendor for the exact thickness of any drive you're thinking of buying, and then measuring your computer's hard drive compartment before buying it.

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Couldn't you have put the 1TB in a caddy and connected it by USB? Or will you be out in the sticks in the far North? Power issue!!

Dont forget to load up with some good pron...... ;)

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Couldn't you have put the 1TB in a caddy and connected it by USB?

As I said in the OP, that's exactly what I've now done. It's a pain (it would have been nice to not have to carry the extra box around), though not the end of the world. But even to get it in the caddy I needed to file down the hooks on the lid.

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As I said in the OP, that's exactly what I've now done. It's a pain (it would have been nice to not have to carry the extra box around), though not the end of the world. But even to get it in the caddy I needed to file down the hooks on the lid.

Also slower.

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I'm very wary of trusting large mechanical HDDs...I've lost two externals (not crap makes either)...I was using them in ripping all my albums (which I've done - twice)...I'd personally have some contingency plan, especially if your storing vital data - I'd have one, then mirror it on to another drive, just in case...

Luckily, you now have sites like Grooveshark, so I've managed to get around it...

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I'm very wary of trusting large mechanical HDDs...I've lost two externals (not crap makes either)

I had a lovely Iomega drive.

iomega%20External%20Hard%20Disk.png

The case was rock solid. The two HDs in it were fine (still are) but the damn thing still died on me. Looking on the internet I saw that this was a very common problem with this model.

At the time it was my only place to put large files (movies, TV shows etc.), now I make sure that I have the same amount of internal storage space as external, so my data is at least in 2 places.

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I'm very wary of trusting large mechanical HDDs...I've lost two externals (not crap makes either)...I was using them in ripping all my albums (which I've done - twice)...I'd personally have some contingency plan, especially if your storing vital data - I'd have one, then mirror it on to another drive, just in case...

Agreed completely. An image of my OS system volumes plus all my mission critical data are backed up both to a different (physcially separate - not different volumes on the same HDD, RAID or anything like that) internal HDDs within my main home desktop PC, plus on USB hard drives that live in my office drawer during the week, come home on Friday, get a new backups on Sunday and then go back to work on Monday. That way, I'm protected from physical destruction (e.g. fire) as well as hard drive failure, by having copies in two separate locations.

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Agreed completely. An image of my OS system volumes plus all my mission critical data are backed up both to a different (physcially separate - not different volumes on the same HDD, RAID or anything like that) internal HDDs within my main home desktop PC, plus on USB hard drives that live in my office drawer during the week, come home on Friday, get a new backups on Sunday and then go back to work on Monday. That way, I'm protected from physical destruction (e.g. fire) as well as hard drive failure, by having copies in two separate locations.

Trouble is, is that most people aren't that cautious...I'd even be tempted to put the absolutely crucial data on a solid state disk of some description...the larger the HDs, the bigger the problem when/if it fails...I'd rather have two 500gb HDs than one 1Tb HD (if need be)...

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Herewith an advance warning for anyone contemplating the purchase of such an object.

Saw one on Fleabay for £70 the other day and decided to go for it, on the grounds that doubling my laptop's hard drive capacity would be extremely useful for when I disappear to Alaska for six weeks in the summer. I have now scanned virtually all my research notes, documents and a couple of hundred out-of-print books to PDF over the last year or so (knackering their spines in the process, but as most of them are from the university library...). There is a super-fast scan facility on the office photocopier (and 400dpi too, so it's not like handwriting etc. is illegible), and combined with Acrobat Pro X (its Clearscan OCR function is amazing - it can even decode my handwriting most of the time!), makes life for an academic who deals with tons of books and papers so much easier. The whole lot is text-searchable as well! I now have about 600-650gb of this scanned material, and thought that just being able to put the whole lot in my laptop was a very enticing prospect.

Well, that idea was swiftly buggered when the thing arrived. It is just too thick - as in, just over a milimeter at most - to fit in my laptop's hard drive compartment. Comparing it with the existing 500gb one, you can clearly see that it's slightly thicker. Presumably there's an extra platter in there. I'd also bought an external caddy into which to stick the displaced old drive. To add insult to injury, the new one wouldn't fit in there, either, until I'd filed down the hooks on the enclosure and now it just will.

So, if anyone is contemplating a laptop hard drive upgrade, beware! For the record, the offending drive is a Samsung 2.5" SATA internal drive, model HM100UI/Z4, and the laptop is an HP DV6910ea. I would strongly advise asking the vendor for the exact thickness of any drive you're thinking of buying, and then measuring your computer's hard drive compartment before buying it.

I read about this problem just before I bought a new drive for my PS3. That also has a small drive bay that can't accept many of the large capacity 2.5" disks.

Since then I've read that advances in platter technology mean that there will be some new drives out shortly that wil fit a smaller bay and still give an enormous capacity.

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Trouble is, is that most people aren't that cautious...I'd even be tempted to put the absolutely crucial data on a solid state disk of some description...the larger the HDs, the bigger the problem when/if it fails...I'd rather have two 500gb HDs than one 1Tb HD (if need be)...

As a general principle, agreed completely. As I said, I didn't buy this HDD with the intention of it being the sole carrier of important data, but for the convenience of being able to cram pretty much all my digitised research materials into my laptop, without having to carry an external drive around with it, and take it to America with me. In fact, had the plan worked, it would have created triple redundancy, with three copies of the stuff in three separate places (home, office and laptop on the move). The amount of data I'm dealing with is too big to make an online storage solution feasible, mainly because of cost and the time taken for the file transfer. If you're just talking about a load of Word documents, then a Carbonite-type service is great and I know people who use them. But a lot of my stuff consists of documents scanned to high resolution, plus digitised audio recordings, and storing the best part of a terabyte this way isn't really feasible as yet. I've had enough HDDs fail on me over the years (plus some astonishing survivors, including one that fell out of the overhead bin of a DC-10 in bad turbulence and still booted up fine, totally error-free, at the other end!) to get it as far as not relying on a single one to preserve data is concerned.

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(plus some astonishing survivors, including one that fell out of the overhead bin of a DC-10 in bad turbulence and still booted up fine, totally error-free, at the other end!) to get it as far as not relying on a single one to preserve data is concerned.

The Wood's family record for HDD survival was one that was in a laptop in the boot of my mid-engined car. The car burnt out in the middle of the motorway with flames 20ft high. Top half of the laptop containing it was melted beyond recognition. Luckily, the laptop was stored on its side and the HDD was facing downwards. Mrs Woods took it out of the burnt, wet (fire brigade doused the car) remains and put it in a new laptop - no dice. She then whacked the drive on a desk a couple of times, reinserted it, and it worked fine...or at least long enough to get all the data off.

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When having mirrors, most people make the mistake of getting two or more (depending on raid config) drives that are all the same ie same batch of same manufacturer supplied drives. Mix the drives ups between manufacturers to get some proper risk reduction.

I've never had a consumer hard drive fail without advance notice; well, technically I've never had a hard drive fail, even my laptop drive from 1995 was still readable in 2007. The three drives that were becoming problematic showed an increasing number of bad sectors before I replaced them.

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The Wood's family record for HDD survival was one that was in a laptop in the boot of my mid-engined car. The car burnt out in the middle of the motorway with flames 20ft high. Top half of the laptop containing it was melted beyond recognition. Luckily, the laptop was stored on its side and the HDD was facing downwards. Mrs Woods took it out of the burnt, wet (fire brigade doused the car) remains and put it in a new laptop - no dice. She then whacked the drive on a desk a couple of times, reinserted it, and it worked fine...or at least long enough to get all the data off.

Impressive.

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The Wood's family record for HDD survival was one that was in a laptop in the boot of my mid-engined car. The car burnt out in the middle of the motorway with flames 20ft high. Top half of the laptop containing it was melted beyond recognition. Luckily, the laptop was stored on its side and the HDD was facing downwards. Mrs Woods took it out of the burnt, wet (fire brigade doused the car) remains and put it in a new laptop - no dice. She then whacked the drive on a desk a couple of times, reinserted it, and it worked fine...or at least long enough to get all the data off.

Putting dead hard drives in the fridge has worked a few time too. But yeh I've had ones that needed a whack too.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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