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Jobs Gloom For A Third Of Recent Graduates As They Languish In Posts That Do Not Require Degree

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2010093/Jobs-gloom-recent-graduates-languish-posts-require-degree.html

More than a third of recent graduates are unemployed or languishing in stop-gap jobs that do not need a degree, official figures show.

Students have been running up debts only to find themselves jobless or doing work for which they are over-qualified.

One in ten of last year’s graduates – 20,000 – are unemployed and more than a quarter are in dead-end jobs.

And pretty soon for this privilege you'll have probably at least £40k of debt. Bargain.

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Target:...50% of school leavers get a degree.

2% of jobs require a degree.

I see a problem.

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What jobs actually NEED a degree? Not that many. In no way are these graduates 'over qualified'.

Edited by Tonkers

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More than a third of recent graduates are unemployed or languishing in stop-gap jobs that do not need a degree, official figures show.

And pretty soon for this privilege you'll have probably at least £40k of debt. Bargain.

It's so sad, verging on treason to create a system that sends so many youg adults without much real world experience off to "Uni" to get the education they believe they need for a good job only for so many of them to be used and abused like cattle being milked by the Universities, Government and Banks with no real enhanced prospects at the end.

Are voters ultimately to blame though? I think yes, as we've become so unable to make hard choices these days. Most people are so easy to be whipped into some moral indignant outrage that there is no way a Government could come in and go, "there's to many of you going to Uni, we don't need as many so we're forcibly reducing places". Instead the only option is for the Government to poison it by slap high charges on going to Uni and let the system limp on for a while (5 to 10 years) before it collapses under itself. The collatoral damage and unintended consequences of this move though will be felt for decades to come though.

I'm only 30 myself and thought my £1050 a year tuition fees with £3000 a year student loan was a bad situation to leave with (many of my friends from this year group are still paying off the student loan), but I look at freshers going to uni and I just hope they enjoy the three years as much as possible because for many they may struggle to enjoy the years that follow.

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It's so sad, verging on treason to create a system that sends so many youg adults without much real world experience off to "Uni" to get the education they believe they need for a good job only for so many of them to be used and abused like cattle being milked by the Universities, Government and Banks with no real enhanced prospects at the end.

Are voters ultimately to blame though? I think yes, as we've become so unable to make hard choices these days. Most people are so easy to be whipped into some moral indignant outrage that there is no way a Government could come in and go, "there's to many of you going to Uni, we don't need as many so we're forcibly reducing places". Instead the only option is for the Government to poison it by slap high charges on going to Uni and let the system limp on for a while (5 to 10 years) before it collapses under itself. The collatoral damage and unintended consequences of this move though will be felt for decades to come though.

I'm only 30 myself and thought my £1050 a year tuition fees with £3000 a year student loan was a bad situation to leave with (many of my friends from this year group are still paying off the student loan), but I look at freshers going to uni and I just hope they enjoy the three years as much as possible because for many they may struggle to enjoy the years that follow.

It definitely is treason when the govt conspire to open the backdoor to allow migrant labour to fill the places that those in education require when they leave - whilst they being processed through the education system.

Suspect that is largely what was behind the pushing of btl en masse too (including tax breaks) - to provide the rental places to allow maximum penetration of migrant labour into the country.

Edited by OnlyMe

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only for so many of them to be used and abused like cattle being milked by the Universities, Government and Banks

You get that in the University of Life too.

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Move along. Nothing (new) to see. Same old, same old.

Arrived earlier this week, an invite to a friend's 50th birthday bash coming up in August. He has first class honours (from Cambridge) and a PhD (not sure where from; he moved university to follow his supervisor during his postgrad years). Guess what he does for a living?

He's a cabbie!

Or another good friend just a year younger, degree from Reading, who works as an administrative clerk at the local council.

Etc, etc.

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Move along. Nothing (new) to see. Same old, same old.

Arrived earlier this week, an invite to a friend's 50th birthday bash coming up in August. He has first class honours (from Cambridge) and a PhD (not sure where from; he moved university to follow his supervisor during his postgrad years). Guess what he does for a living?

He's a cabbie!

Or another good friend just a year younger, degree from Reading, who works as an administrative clerk at the local council.

Etc, etc.

50% of the cambridge blokes generation didn't go to Uni.

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Move along. Nothing (new) to see. Same old, same old.

Arrived earlier this week, an invite to a friend's 50th birthday bash coming up in August. He has first class honours (from Cambridge) and a PhD (not sure where from; he moved university to follow his supervisor during his postgrad years). Guess what he does for a living?

He's a cabbie!

Or another good friend just a year younger, degree from Reading, who works as an administrative clerk at the local council.

Etc, etc.

not uncommon for someone with a very high IQ to do a menial job that avoids someone supervising them directly, they either go for a challenging job with real skill (university or commercial research) or a more lowly one, the middle ranking stuff in the service industry would involve working for someone less able than them with an ego problem constantly trying to catch them out, not worth the stress

my guess would be he is a very sorted privtae investor on the side, no?

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my guess would be he is a very sorted privtae investor on the side, no?

Um, no. A better word would be naïve.

I recollect only one conversation with him on matters of investment. It must've been autumn 2008, 'cos he was philosophical about the demise of his Northern Rock shares. But he'd just doubled up on his Bradford&Bingley investment at about 50p.

Him: Well, it's fallen so far, it can't get much lower.

Me: Oh yes it can!

Don't know if he holds anything more successful ...

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Um, no. A better word would be naïve.

I recollect only one conversation with him on matters of investment. It must've been autumn 2008, 'cos he was philosophical about the demise of his Northern Rock shares. But he'd just doubled up on his Bradford&Bingley investment at about 50p.

Him: Well, it's fallen so far, it can't get much lower.

Me: Oh yes it can!

Don't know if he holds anything more successful ...

f*ck

oh dear there goes my theory...!

what field was he in for his PhD anyway?

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f*ck

oh dear there goes my theory...!

what field was he in for his PhD anyway?

History.

It's actually an interesting read. We see how people many centuries ago had some of the same issues as today. Like, in one chapter I recollect, he reconstructs (from sources such as ancient parish records) arguments that were going on at the time between those who advocated unconditional relief for the poor and those who insisted on a distinction between the deserving and undeserving poor.

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50% of the cambridge blokes generation didn't go to Uni.

If he turned 50 in 2011 then he was born in 1961 and probably attended Cambridge 79-82.

I don't know the exact figures (anyone?) but the percentage of non-graduates then was much higher than 50%. (I would guess well over 80%?).

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Shedload of jobs in engineering. Mind you the degree for that is like a working week as opposed to 3 lectures and a tutorial so doesn't appeal to those who have 'rights' to a university experience.

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The more I think about it the more annoyed I get. WTF over qualified? Are these the same twats who can't even get bar work right? How many grads have I come across who can't even pour a pint? OVER QUALIFIED MY ****! Not fit to clean my toilet.

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i actually think a degree is undervalued when compared with professional qualifications, the fact that you have studied for 4 years on a daily basis in a classroom environment proves your ability as much as studying for any professional qualification does.

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Considering we are in a pretty poor state - does anybody else think these stats are quite the opposite of bad ?!

So one in 4 are in jobs that are not particularly related to their degree - and only one in ten is actually out of work. Sounds like a reason to cheer IMO. Most degrees are not worth much really. So if only one in ten is out of work then the jobs market must be much better than we are told.

More than a third of recent graduates are unemployed or languishing in stop-gap jobs that do not need a degree, official figures show.

Students have been running up debts only to find themselves jobless or doing work for which they are over-qualified.

One in ten of last year’s graduates – 20,000 – are unemployed and more than a quarter are in dead-end jobs.

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i actually think a degree is undervalued when compared with professional qualifications, the fact that you have studied for 4 years on a daily basis in a classroom environment proves your ability as much as studying for any professional qualification does.

If only real life resembled a classroom, eh?

The problem is the crushed expectations. Tell someone they have a pension and then it doesn#'t materialise? Pissed off wannabe pensioner.

Tell someone they have a good career ahead of them when they don't? Pissed off over educated malcontent.

Tell someont hey have savings when they have IOU's? Pissed off person who made a lot of malinvestments.

And it all comes back to banking. Misrepresenting how many resources there are is downright fricking evil.

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Whenever I interview graduates I can't help feeling a bit sorry for them, They have been totally conned into taking their degree and are probably now less likely to secure the job with us than the gcse/a level candidate I'm seeing next (who hasn't bought into the uni BS and is likely to be less gullible and self important than they are.)

It's even often counter productive to put you have a degree on your CV when applying for jobs which do not require one, Particularly if the role nothing to do with your subject. i.e applying for account management when you've spent 3+ years on a media studies degree/graphic design degree says to me - you're a bit of a gullible fool, have no ambition and will probably leave us at the slightest sniff of employment in you original chosen field.

Does Sr'alan finger point ;

*You're not hired"

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a degree isnt just about getting a job although it can move you up the ladder or can be a minimum standard for some jobs. its also about education, you dont do gcse's and a-levels just for the job prospects alone.

in terms of being over qualified this can be a problem. if you see someone with a degree with a good grade in a certain subject, you are wary about how much that person wants to be at your company if its something totally unrelated. you dont necessarily want to invest to much time in someone who will be looking to do something else in 6 months.

anyone can pay lip service and say i really want this job but just by looking at their CV and qualifications alarm bells can start ringing a mile off, if their history is not related, youll think theyre just looking for something to tie them over till they find a different job.

its not just about how competant someone is sometimes but how well they fit your company in what youre looking for, will they be happy working for you for example. a motivated worker is more important than a well educated one who is bored.

Edited by mfp123

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More than a third of recent graduates are unemployed or languishing in stop-gap jobs that do not need a degree, official figures show.

If 50% are going into higher education, that is the top half of the jobs in the country covered. Some of these must end up doing jobs in the lower half. The top half of jobs is never going to be graduate level. We need far more car mechanics than we do car designers.

its also about education

Yet people with an education feel entitled to a good job. Having a good education is no different to being good at golf yet people do not expect to run the company because they excel at their hobbies. The educators have pushed the line that having an education is a valuable thing for the taxpayer to fund because it will bring prosperity both to the students and the country. This is now shown to be false.

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Yet people with an education feel entitled to a good job. Having a good education is no different to being good at golf yet people do not expect to run the company because they excel at their hobbies. The educators have pushed the line that having an education is a valuable thing for the taxpayer to fund because it will bring prosperity both to the students and the country. This is now shown to be false.

It should certainly give them the chance of that. Restrict education too much and the chance is gone. There needs to be a debate about what level education for everyone needs to go to in order to give everyone an equal chance. It needs to be up to a level where it's possible to determine if a student will benefit from more, and where, and my gut feeling is that it used to get that about right but these days gets pushed too far up the scale.

That all said, these days university provides utterly essential training, namely in how to get into a large amount of debt pretty quickly, and we all know that the country needs people to do that.

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Move along. Nothing (new) to see. Same old, same old.

Arrived earlier this week, an invite to a friend's 50th birthday bash coming up in August. He has first class honours (from Cambridge) and a PhD (not sure where from; he moved university to follow his supervisor during his postgrad years). Guess what he does for a living?

He's a cabbie!

Or another good friend just a year younger, degree from Reading, who works as an administrative clerk at the local council.

Etc, etc.

What degree did he do? That's is more important than him/her being a Doctorate.

<edited>Due to poor use of the English language</edited>

Edited by I want a house!

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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