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Ny Times - Job Jugglers, On The Tightrope

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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/26/business/26work.html?_r=1&ref=business

WHEN someone asks Roger Fierro “What do you do?” — which he knows is shorthand for “Where do you work?” — he laughs. Then he says, “I do everything.”

Mr. Fierro, who is 26, has four jobs: working as a bilingual-curriculum specialist for the textbook publisher Pearson; handling estate sales and online marketing for a store that sells vintage items; setting up an online store for a custom piñata maker; and developing reality-show ideas for a production company. So far this month, he’s made about $1,800.

Whereas most 9-to-5ers have some kind of structure in their lives, each workday can be wildly different for him. On a recent day, he worked on and off from 7 a.m. to midnight, making business calls, working on the piñata store’s Web site and visiting the vintage store, among other things. (To maintain his sanity, he made sure to schedule some “me” time from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8.)

“I have eight million things going on,” said Mr. Fierro, who lives in the West Town area of Chicago. “It’s exhausting. Sometimes I just want to take a nap.”

Our new slave role for the bankers, several jobs, no family life just work to pay the debt till you die.

A sign of things to come for those lucky enough to have jobs?

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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/26/business/26work.html?_r=1&ref=business

Our new slave role for the bankers, several jobs, no family life just work to pay the debt till you die.

A sign of things to come for those lucky enough to have jobs?

Firstly, what makes you so sure he's in debt and has to work to pay it off? Some people enjoy working long hours and find it hugely rewarding. "Find a job you love and you'll never work a day in your life." - Confucius

Secondly, the profession arguably most synonymous with long hours and demanding working conditions is... banking!

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Firstly, what makes you so sure he's in debt and has to work to pay it off? Some people enjoy working long hours and find it hugely rewarding. "Find a job you love and you'll never work a day in your life." - Confucius

Secondly, the profession arguably most synonymous with long hours and demanding working conditions is... banking!

I'm more projecting forward that as people lose their jobs the only ones they might find is part time work.

Plus:

Mr. Fierro, for one, has a degree in international studies and Latin American studies at the University of Chicago.

....

But in many cases, necessity is driving the trend. “Young college graduates working multiple jobs is a natural consequence of a bad labor market and having, on average, $20,000 worth of student loans to pay off,” said Carl E. Van Horn, director of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers.

He's a student, unless his family where extremely rich, the chances are he's already got a nice amount of student debt that needs to be paid.

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I once had two full time jobs, both standard business hours.

This occurred when had a new job offer which I accepted, so I then resigned from my first job, but my resignation wasn't immediately accepted, and I weakly agreed to delay whilst my existing boss tried to get me a better offer (not a short process).

As the old firm wanted me to work my notice, I then ended up with a departure date 4 weeks into my new job. So I started the new job, and to give an impression of vaguely doing something in the old job (where I often worked from home) I set up the 1 month go to my PC trial, and periodically logged onto my old work computer to check and reply to the odd email as well as maintaining an online presence. This was easier than carrying 2 laptops.

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I once had two full time jobs, both standard business hours.

This occurred when had a new job offer which I accepted, so I then resigned from my first job, but my resignation wasn't immediately accepted, and I weakly agreed to delay whilst my existing boss tried to get me a better offer (not a short process).

As the old firm wanted me to work my notice, I then ended up with a departure date 4 weeks into my new job. So I started the new job, and to give an impression of vaguely doing something in the old job (where I often worked from home) I set up the 1 month go to my PC trial, and periodically logged onto my old work computer to check and reply to the odd email as well as maintaining an online presence. This was easier than carrying 2 laptops.

Not so long ago I did a stint taking calls in my local Doctors Out of Hours service to fit around my main job as main child carer. One Dr who worked there with me juggled another role as the Police on-call Dr and on a few occasions got called out and had to work remotely, I was happy to spin plates for him as he was a laugh and always brought me back a McDonalds although i'd quickly lose my appetite when he discussed the form12 (deceased) he may have just dealt with in all it's gory detail. :D

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This is pretty normal:

Myself I have no debt, but I work lots of little part time jobs.

Currently right now:

I work for a logistics company 3am to 6am I pretty much organise the loading of the lorries. I do this 3 days a week.

I peel potatoes for 3 chippies , 6 days a week 1 hour at each chippy.

I pack canopies at Dropzones for £3 a pop the official packers hate me because they all clubbed together to charge £5 per pack job. I can pack 3 per hour using a snubbed packing technique. I usually do 15-30 pack jobs a week (depends on the weather and how lazy everybody is feeling). Sometime next year I'll be able to fly camera = being paid to skydive £17 per jump you can cram one per hour in.

I do back of shop work (meat prep, veg chopping) for a couple of cafes.

I currently shop for some old people who live nearby, they don't per se pay me but they tend to regularly bring round cookies or pies or complete meals they've made for me.

I teach English to foreigners working in the UK for a bit of money here and there.

Last week I also installed a CCTV system and fixed an air conditioning system.

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Mr. Fierro, who is 26, has four jobs: working as a bilingual-curriculum specialist for the textbook publisher Pearson; handling estate sales and online marketing for a store that sells vintage items; setting up an online store for a custom piñata maker; and developing reality-show ideas for a production company. So far this month, he’s made about $1,800.

He's certainly competing head to head with the Chinese. At least the Chinese give themselves time for the occasional nice bowl of rice (no stereotyping here ;) ) - or maybe not.

Edited by billybong

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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