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okaycuckoo

Convert To Sodium Bicarbonate

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Past three weeks I've been using sodium bicarbonate (baking soda - not baking powder) instead of soaps, shampoos, deodorants, detergents, washing powder, carpet cleaner etc.

This stuff cleans and scrubs everything - hair, skin, teeth, fabrics. Plus it doesn't strip out oils, so you don't need conditioner or moisturiser. Plus it doesn't leave residues of dodgy z-sounding chemicals, or fluoride. Plus it's not harmful (although consider it as salt if you're ingesting it). Plus you can use it as an odourless talc and it will keep cleaning throughout the day.

As far as I understand, the secret is that it neutralises acids and also moderates alkaline ph.

Sprinkle it on a fabric, leave for a day, shake it off - fresh as a daisy, no need for dry cleaning. Chuck it in the dishwasher and the washing machine - great for whitening. Not great for clearing drains, but it does stop them clogging. Makes glass crystal clear, metal finishes shine like silver plate. And it takes the sting out of acid foods - too much vinegar or chili, just add a pinch of sodium bicarbonate and stir. Also dozens of folk remedies available online.

Anyone else have experience of this stuff? Am I missing something? Miles better than the packaged products. Can't believe it's not common knowledge.

Buy in bulk from chinese shops - about 1/4 of the price of the big supermarkets. Unilever will collapse. Hehe!

edit: spulloing.

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Past three weeks I've been using sodium bicarbonate (baking soda - not baking powder) instead of soaps, shampoos, deodorants, detergents, washing powder, carpet cleaners etc.

This stuff cleans and scrubs everything - hair, skin, teeth, fabrics. Plus it doesn't strip out oils, so you don't need conditioner or moisturiser. Plus it doesn't leave residues of dodgy z-sounding chemicals, or fluoride. Plus it's not harmful (although consider it as salt if you're ingesting it). Plus you can use it as an odourless talc and it will keep cleaning throughout the day.

As far as I understand, the secret is that it neutralises acids and also moderates alkaline ph.

Sprinkle it on a fabric, leave for a day, shake it off - fresh as a daisy, no need for dry cleaning. Chuck it in the dishwasher and the washing machine - great for whitening. Not great for clearing drains, but it does stop them clogging. Makes glass crystal clear, metal finishes shine like silver plate. And it takes the sting out of acid foods. Also dozens of folk remedies available online.

Anyone else have experience of this stuff? Am I missing something? Miles better than the packaged products. Can't believe it's not common knowledge.

Buy in bulk from chinese shops - about 1/4 of the price of the big supermarkets. Unilever will collapse. Hehe!

edit: spiloink

I'm going to give this a try, I'm sick of chemicals in the home. It infuriates me when see people spraying air freshener around their home, especially when there is kids about - how much crap is inside the air freshener spray?!

Going to buy some and try it on my carpet - could do with a clean!

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Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and sodium carbonate (washing soda) are very useful substances to keep around the house. The carbonate is somewhat "stronger" than bicarbonate and may be too strong for some purposes.

Bicarbonate is a useful ingredient in toothpaste - it's gritty so it acts as an abrasive to help shift stains and adherent plaque, it helps water flow, and helps neutralise plaque acid. By and large, it's OK on its own, but it lacks detergents which are helpful for washing the mouth out, antibacterials to prevent plaque return and fluoride, which even the very cheapest budget supermarket brands will have. You could always mix a little old-fashioned soap with the bicarbonate to a more powerful toothpaste - but it does taste terrible.

As a washing agent it's useful as it's abrasive, so it removes dead skin an unblocks pores. It doesn't remove grease and oils, so is useful for people with very dry skin - but does give disappointing results if your hands are greasy. You can get the same result by using regular salt (or ludicrously overpriced 'dead sea salt' crystals from some posh cosmetic retailers).

For cleaning of household items, it acts as a gentle abrasive so is highly effective at polishing soft metals, such as jewellery and glass. Add a bit of soap to add a bit of additional cleaning power.

Carbonate is helpful as a wash booster and water softener for laundry. Stick a cup in the wash with the powder, and you'll get a better wash and less lime scale buildup on the machine. Like calgon, but a lot cheaper.

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I'm going to give this a try, I'm sick of chemicals in the home. It infuriates me when see people spraying air freshener around their home, especially when there is kids about - how much crap is inside the air freshener spray?!

Going to buy some and try it on my carpet - could do with a clean!

Look at the ingredients lable on a bottle of shake 'n vac - they won't tell you what's in it because .... it's 95% sodium bicarb supplemented with cheap honkey perfume!

Try it on mattresses as well - rub the powder in, hoover up after 24 hours = adolescent smelly-bedroom syndrome disappears overnight.

Seriously interested in replies from people who have tried this stuff.

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Look at the ingredients lable on a bottle of shake 'n vac - they won't tell you what's in it because .... it's 95% sodium bicarb supplemented with cheap honkey perfume!

Try it on mattresses as well - rub the powder in, hoover up after 24 hours = adolescent smelly-bedroom syndrome disappears overnight.

Seriously interested in replies from people who have tried this stuff.

Using it neat as a toothpaste I found to be a little over the top.

My gums would nip a little, my lips dried out, and I got cold sores on the spots where it dripped onto my lip as I brushed.

Instead of using toohpastes full of sodium laureth sulfate and fluoride, I use home made soap (pure soap) with essential oils and a bit of sodium bicarbonate in.

After I brush with the soap, my teeth squeak when I rub my finger over them. When I brush with toothpaste, my finger would glide over a film left behind by the paste.

I really could not go back to using toothpaste.

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Using it neat as a toothpaste I found to be a little over the top.

My gums would nip a little, my lips dried out, and I got cold sores on the spots where it dripped onto my lip as I brushed.

Instead of using toohpastes full of sodium laureth sulfate and fluoride, I use home made soap (pure soap) with essential oils and a bit of sodium bicarbonate in.

After I brush with the soap, my teeth squeak when I rub my finger over them. When I brush with toothpaste, my finger would glide over a film left behind by the paste.

I really could not go back to using toothpaste.

Thanks.

I switch between fluoride toothpaste and wet toothbrush dipped in sodium bicarb, day by day. Also using sodium bicarb as mouthwash.

I've read one recommendation of hydroxide + sodium bicarb, but my main dental hygiene thing is flossing.

Completely open to advice - particularly the advice that simple is better.

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Already ahead of you, and many canny people also.

There have been shortages of Sodium Bicarbonate, and the price has gone up. Also the same with Citric Acid. I know I buy the stuff from the chemist.

But why don't you buy the diluted down, expensive branded stuff???!!! hehe.

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Already ahead of you, and many canny people also.

There have been shortages of Sodium Bicarbonate, and the price has gone up. Also the same with Citric Acid. I know I buy the stuff from the chemist.

But why don't you buy the diluted down, expensive branded stuff???!!! hehe.

We've used this company for Bicarb, White Vinegar and other natural cleaning products

We got fed up paying over the odds for chemical laced crap.

Kim and Aggie have lots of tips on using basic products to clean with.

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I think my DNS or router are playing up. I seem to be receiving pages from Mums'Net or something.

+1

Anybody want some coupons for 10p off tinned eggs?

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I think my DNS or router are playing up. I seem to be receiving pages from Mums'Net or something.

If HPC is the new Mumsnet then Fubra will need to add a lot more smilies!

:huh::angry::blink::lol::o:(B):D

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My two standbys for heavy duty cleaning are caustic soda (sohium hydroxide) and spirit of salts. Actually, I'm quite surprised you can still buy spirit of salts over the counter as it's 32% hydrocloric acid.

Two products where you really, really DO need to read and follow the instructions!

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My two standbys for heavy duty cleaning are caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) and spirit of salts.

Not sure I'd be messing about with sodium hydroxide. Homer Simpsons It burns, it burns!

32% hydrocloric acid...

What do you clean with industrial gloves, a lab coat and goggles?

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My two standbys for heavy duty cleaning are caustic soda (sohium hydroxide) and spirit of salts. Actually, I'm quite surprised you can still buy spirit of salts over the counter as it's 32% hydrocloric acid.

Two products where you really, really DO need to read and follow the instructions!

mods - please move this post to the what if it all goes wrong stash thread please.

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Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and sodium carbonate (washing soda) are very useful substances to keep around the house. The carbonate is somewhat "stronger" than bicarbonate and may be too strong for some purposes.

Bicarbonate is a useful ingredient in toothpaste - it's gritty so it acts as an abrasive to help shift stains and adherent plaque, it helps water flow, and helps neutralise plaque acid. By and large, it's OK on its own, but it lacks detergents which are helpful for washing the mouth out, antibacterials to prevent plaque return and fluoride, which even the very cheapest budget supermarket brands will have. You could always mix a little old-fashioned soap with the bicarbonate to a more powerful toothpaste - but it does taste terrible.

As a washing agent it's useful as it's abrasive, so it removes dead skin an unblocks pores. It doesn't remove grease and oils, so is useful for people with very dry skin - but does give disappointing results if your hands are greasy. You can get the same result by using regular salt (or ludicrously overpriced 'dead sea salt' crystals from some posh cosmetic retailers).

For cleaning of household items, it acts as a gentle abrasive so is highly effective at polishing soft metals, such as jewellery and glass. Add a bit of soap to add a bit of additional cleaning power.

Carbonate is helpful as a wash booster and water softener for laundry. Stick a cup in the wash with the powder, and you'll get a better wash and less lime scale buildup on the machine. Like calgon, but a lot cheaper.

Sodium Bicarbonate exhibits strong anti microbial effects whereas Sodium Carbonate only has a a very weak effect in this regard.

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Read here to find out how air fresheners make you ill.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-322521/Air-fresheners-harm-mother-baby.html

If you want to freshen a house use some flowers from the garden thats what proper women do!

i hate air fresheners, spray polish and the like, really get's in my throat. i even have to 'run away' after i've sprayed deodrant.

might get some roll on or use this soda stuff as discussed here, see how i get on with it :)

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i hate air fresheners, spray polish and the like, really get's in my throat. i even have to 'run away' after i've sprayed deodrant.

might get some roll on or use this soda stuff as discussed here, see how i get on with it :)

I do not buy aerosol sprays, they are very bad for your lungs....be warned. ;)

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My two standbys for heavy duty cleaning are caustic soda (sohium hydroxide) and spirit of salts. Actually, I'm quite surprised you can still buy spirit of salts over the counter as it's 32% hydrocloric acid.

Two products where you really, really DO need to read and follow the instructions!

Yep. Between them they can unblock any drain. BUT DON'T MIX THEM!

They're a bit stong for personal grooming. I get by with Swarfega, and Brut for added class if the bird is a bit upmarket.

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Yep. Between them they can unblock any drain. BUT DON'T MIX THEM!

coward :P

When I was a lab rat we used a concoction known as a nitric fiz for real stubborn glassware stains, I believe it's instant dismissal for even thinking about it these days.

Another, less crazy one, was chromic acid which was nowhere near as much fun but a pretty orange colour if I recollect correctly.

Aqua regia (HCl and HNO3) will desolve gold so I'd either take your wedding ring off or wear gloves, rubber not woolen!

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I'm going to give this a try, I'm sick of chemicals in the home. It infuriates me when see people spraying air freshener around their home, especially when there is kids about - how much crap is inside the air freshener spray?!

Going to buy some and try it on my carpet - could do with a clean!

Sodium Bicarbonate is a chemical.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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