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Patfig

Free Anti Virus

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II am looking for a free antivrus program for an old PC that is to be used online.

I have used avg in the past but they seem to have scaled down what you get for free.

I hope that you might be able to give me some recommendations

Cheers

Patfig

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II am looking for a free antivrus program for an old PC that is to be used online.

I have used avg in the past but they seem to have scaled down what you get for free.

I hope that you might be able to give me some recommendations

Cheers

Patfig

Microsoft Security Essentials, hardly know it's there & works a treat.

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If it's an old PC minimum requirements MSE might be too consuming.

http://www.cloudantivirus.com/en/

If it's an old PC and you just want cover when it's connected to the internet I'd suggest using this, it's also ideal for netbooks. It uses cloud technology so the virus database isn't stored on the local computer.

I've got this installed on my old laptop with a 1ghz CPU.

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II am looking for a free antivrus program for an old PC that is to be used online.

I have used avg in the past but they seem to have scaled down what you get for free.

I hope that you might be able to give me some recommendations

Cheers

Patfig

Slightly tangential I am afraid, but I would recommend installing Ubuntu rather than using M$. This removes any significant need for antivirus on a simple machine, with the following caveats from here:

to scan a Windows drive in your PC

to scan a Windows-based network attached server or hard drive

to scan Windows machines over a network

to scan files you are going to send to other people

to scan e-mail you are going to forward to other people

some Windows viruses can run with Wine.

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I had to a remove a virus from a customers system yesterday morning which had McAfee and Avira on it. Both failed in their duty.

At the same time? I was under the impression that is a bit of a no no..

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At the same time? I was under the impression that is a bit of a no no..

It generally is, installing 2 AV can kill the system as they fight over resources. No one AV is 100% effective, saying that one failed it's duty shows a distinct lack of understanding over how AV software works.

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It generally is, installing 2 AV can kill the system as they fight over resources. No one AV is 100% effective, saying that one failed it's duty shows a distinct lack of understanding over how AV software works.

To add a bit more:

I did once get AVG and Sophos working together fine, I even tested it with a virus that both detected and it didn't crash the machine, from memory I think Sophos let AVG detect and remove it. The risk is both detect a virus and then fight over who gets to deal with the threat. Simply having 2 running together doesn't mean they are compatible if you've got the real time scanners active you need to test the PC with Eicar Test Virus which all AV software should detect. If your PC crashes with both running you need to start again and try and find 2 that can work together. However this could take a lot of time and a lot of effort for very little benefit.

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http://content.dell.com/uk/en/enterprise/d/large-business/using-multiple-anti-virus.aspx

It stands to reason that using multiple anti-virus solutions can help bridge the coverage gaps between products. Sometimes this can be true, but, depending on how it's done, it may introduce additional problems.

Desktop-based virus scanners typically operate in two modes: real-time protection and on-demand scanning. In real-time mode, the anti-virus software hooks into the operating system to scan files as they are acquired – for example, when a file is downloaded through your Web browser or an attachment is opened from an email. Real-time protection can be a very effective way to prevent a virus from ever executing, but it comes with some cost. Depending on the system, real-time protection can slow down performance. Because it needs to examine every file that is opened and occupies a permanent memory footprint, real-time protection can impede the user experience on machines with limited resources, such as an old PC or even a newer netbook.

More significantly, it is not advised to run two real-time scanners at the same time. Because they hook into the operating system to "grab" files that have been opened, two or more such scanners can cause conflicts. Depending on how they are programmed, the conflicts could result in anything from false alerts when one scanner thinks the other is malware, to outright crashes, potentially resulting in data loss or corruption.

When an anti-virus scanner is used in on-demand mode, it behaves more like a standard desktop application. The scanner will open each file on the system (depending on the kinds of files being scanned), search for a known virus signature, and then close that file. You can run multiple anti-virus scanners in on-demand mode. That said, it can take a very long time for a full on-demand scan – sometimes hours. Running frequent scans using multiple products could seriously hurt your machine's performance for other applications.

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Hey back in your corner Mac Haggis

Sorry oh great IT one !!

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I use Avast and Malwarebytes to do a system scan, while Zonealarm is my firewall.

Nortons slows your PC down too much.

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I use Avast and Malwarebytes to do a system scan, while Zonealarm is my firewall.

Nortons slows your PC down too much.

The kids have kept installing the free norton system scan, it's an old PC and it just grinds to a halt.

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Depending on what you want to use it for, installing a Linux distribution might not be a bad idea from a security standpoint. Perhaps you could list the key functions it needs to carry out - you should get some good advice as to whether this might be a sensible (and free!) course of action. :)

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Microsoft Security Essentials, hardly know it's there & works a treat.

+1 and as it is MSFT, they gve it away without trying to flog the upgrade/commercial version. I did use AVG for a while, but there you have to install the trial, then downgrade and reinstall the free versions or something weird like that.

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Malwarebytes free product worked so well for me I bought their commercial product. It cost a negligable amount of money, is regularly updated, and seems to work fine.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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