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Pre 47 British 50% Coins

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Does any one bother with them?

Not me, but if you know where you can get them cheap in terms of their silver content they might be worth a punt. If the price of silver continues up (which of course I believe it will) then they should make you a few quid in the future, even when sold as scrap to be melted.

But if you can't get them for a serious discount on the silver content, just buy bullion and save yourself the hassle.

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Not me, but if you know where you can get them cheap in terms of their silver content they might be worth a punt. If the price of silver continues up (which of course I believe it will) then they should make you a few quid in the future, even when sold as scrap to be melted.

But if you can't get them for a serious discount on the silver content, just buy bullion and save yourself the hassle.

Thanks for the reply. My thoughs aswell tbh, i asked as there is quite a pile for sale at my local auction tomorrow

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Does anybody have a handy guide as to the typical silver weight per type of coin? It would be handy to know when you find the odd one.

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Thanks for the reply. My thoughs aswell tbh, i asked as there is quite a pile for sale at my local auction tomorrow

As you are keeping an eye on your local auction, you might be interested in this recent Moneyweek article about buying antique silverware at or around scrap price, which one can keep to one side and take advantage of future extra up side on top of the metal price.

A surprising alternative to gold

By Bengt Saelensminde Jun 24, 2011

Okay, I guess you know the story by now: over the next year, we need to prepare ourselves for another dip in the economy. And that will surely spur global governments to launch another desperate round of money printing.

A year from now, we could be right in the thick of it as the latest batch of fiat currencies reach their expiry dates!

So how do we protect our wealth? Well, we have our gold. That should do well as governments run the printing presses (there’s more on gold later). But today I want to talk about a less obvious solution – antiques.

Like gold, or any ‘hard assets’ for that matter, antiques can’t simply be recreated. That’s why they’ve always been a great store of value. Though I say always, the market is cyclical – things go in and out of fashion. And largely speaking, the last couple of decades haven’t been kind to the antiques business.

But right now, there’s a chance that the financial markets are lining antiques up for a rise.[/b] This is a great chance for you to seek out a tangible store of wealth, just as financial markets head for breaking point.

My favourite area of the antiques market

Whenever I look at the markets, I’m always looking to get something for nothing. Like buying companies that are trading below the value of their assets for instance.

Right now, I think we’ve got that in one sector of the antiques market. And that is in silver. I’m not talking about the whole silver market, but just the bottom end. At the cheap end of the market, silver items trade at, or close to scrap value. And that’s an opportunity.

I’m sure you’ve noticed silver’s meteoric rise from well under $10 an ounce right to around $35. That’s what we call ‘spot’ silver; and it’s what drives the scrap value of silver.

During the days when silver was say £8 an ounce, you might expect to pay something like £18 for a one-ounce sterling silver spoon. That is £8 for the silver content and then another tenner for the craftsmanship (and dealers margin).

But now that the silver price has surged, many buyers in the antiques markets aren’t prepared to shell out for the extra value of the silver content. They won’t even pay the scrap price for such a spoon. In my example, the scrap price would be around twenty-five quid. Ooooh, says the buyer. That spoon was only £18 the other year… nope, I’m not paying up for that.

And here’s the thing. That spoon is now a heck of a lot cheaper! If you can pick it up at, or near scrap, then you’re getting all the craftsmanship for free.

And because many people won’t buy the stuff now, a lot of silver is getting scrapped. Former family heirlooms, as well as interesting one-off pieces are heading for the smelter.

As the ingots come out, they go to fuel investor demand on the financial markets. So I say, let’s get out there and save some of these pieces from premature cremation.

http://www.moneyweek.com/investments/precious-metals-and-gems/other/the-best-bet-in-the-antiques-market-54324

Edited by Take Me Back To London!

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As you are keeping an eye on your local auction, you might be interested in this recent Moneyweek article about buying antique silverware at or around scrap price, which one can keep to one side and take advantage of future extra up side on top of the metal price.

http://www.moneyweek.com/investments/precious-metals-and-gems/other/the-best-bet-in-the-antiques-market-54324

The best way to buy silver imho,

Keen price and useable :)

Edited by i'm Alan Partridge

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Does anybody have a handy guide as to the typical silver weight per type of coin? It would be handy to know when you find the odd one.

Not really, that is something that you have to learn. There are sites that give melt value of coins at spot but that doesnt help you when you are out and about.

Use wiki for coin weights and remember them, know what the price of silver is per gram roughly, remember that pre 20 is sterling and pre 47 is 50% and remember with pre 20 stuff that it isnt all pure but x0.925 ;)

Roughly a crown is 28g, halfcrown 14g, florin 11g, sixpence 2.8g and threepence 1.4g

I remember it as a sixpence being 10 to a crown, halfcrowns and threepence being half of that.

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Does any one bother with them?

I do. They are as good as any other coin IMO and they are an affordable way of buying silver with some history. Why melt them down when they are easily identifiable with a known weight and silver content, no assaying required. And lets not forget the copper content either, which seems to be ignored.

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I do. They are as good as any other coin IMO and they are an affordable way of buying silver with some history. Why melt them down when they are easily identifiable with a known weight and silver content, no assaying required. And lets not forget the copper content either, which seems to be ignored.

Was not aware of a copper content. A cocktail for success i think :)

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I do. They are as good as any other coin IMO and they are an affordable way of buying silver with some history.

Agreed.

Why melt them down when they are easily identifiable with a known weight and silver content, no assaying required.

Another good point

And lets not forget the copper content either, which seems to be ignored.

Ignored for good reason....it is irrelevant. Pre 20 stuff has a maximum of 7.5% copper which lets face it, anyone buying or melting silver is not remotely interested in. Stuff from 1920 to 1947 has 0 cu in it iirc.

If you want copper then there is probably far more in your pocket now than in your stack. Just keep all you 1p's and 2p's that arent magnetic ;) They dont seem to be as common as they once were though :)

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  • 285 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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