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How Much Would The Nhs Pay For £2 Bag Of Pasta

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2006006/NHS--2-packet-pasta-cost-50-including-delivery.html

Wasteful health chiefs have been paying almost £50 for a £2 packet of pasta, it has emerged.

While many shoppers have been watching every penny they spend, it would appear some health service bosses have been acting far less frugally with taxpayer cash.

Now one NHS Trust has finally come to its senses and is getting patients to buy the packets in supermarkets for £2.

Everyone who previously had gluten-free pasta on prescription from the Eastern and Coastal Kent NHS Trust has now been advised to buy it themselves.

'A £2 packet of pasta from a supermarket could cost the NHS up to £47,' said Alison Issott, assistant director of medicines management at the Trust.

She added: 'It will cost £5 from the manufacturer, plus a £1 dispensing fee, £1 pharmacy fee and a delivery charge up to £40.

'Manufacturers and wholesalers can charge the NHS significantly more for gluten-free products than when bought directly in a supermarket.

Anyone come close at guessing the cost?

Now anyone with any amount of common sense here would have struck up a deal with the patients local supermarket, but hey when it's someone elses money we deal with the manufacturer directly and waste as much money as possible.

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Now anyone with any amount of common sense here would have struck up a deal with the patients local supermarket, but hey when it's someone elses money we deal with the manufacturer directly and waste as much money as possible.

How dare you - that money was not wasted - it has gone into the economy, via some hard working families bank account.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2006006/NHS--2-packet-pasta-cost-50-including-delivery.html

Anyone come close at guessing the cost?

Now anyone with any amount of common sense here would have struck up a deal with the patients local supermarket, but hey when it's someone elses money we deal with the manufacturer directly and waste as much money as possible.

How the hell is gluten free pasta available on prescription anyway? I'm allergic to the lack of cavier and champagne in my diet at the moment - I need them on prescription please...

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2006006/NHS--2-packet-pasta-cost-50-including-delivery.html

Anyone come close at guessing the cost?

Now anyone with any amount of common sense here would have struck up a deal with the patients local supermarket, but hey when it's someone elses money we deal with the manufacturer directly and waste as much money as possible.

Thats quite impressive, its more than it costs here

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Clearly an opportunity to save money here.

However, a bit unfair to compare the supermarket shelf cost to one that includes a £40 delivery charge. There would be a delivery charge from the supermarket too.

£2 vs £7 might be a fairer comparison of the overpayment.

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£2 vs £7 might be a fairer comparison of the overpayment.

£7 delivered vs £47 delivered is the real comparison.

But yes, the real problem is why NHS pays £40 for delivery of precscriptions.

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Makes you wonder how these private sector businesses can survive without the largesse of the taxpayer subsidising them.

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They've spent all those £billions on computers and they can't get it delivered at a reasonable price.

Tesco's advertise it and they'll even give you £10 off your first grocery delivery. I'm sure that the £10 off would apply to the NHS as well.

Edited by billybong

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Nothing surprises me anymore when it comes to the NHS and what they will pay for things.

My mother-in-law works in an NHS hospital in a lab role. Her favourites are: £60 to change a light bulb and £15,000 to widen a doorway by two inches.

I won't tell you about the recent "cleaning products" story as it is unlikely you would ever enter a hospital again.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2006006/NHS--2-packet-pasta-cost-50-including-delivery.html

Anyone come close at guessing the cost?

Now anyone with any amount of common sense here would have struck up a deal with the patients local supermarket, but hey when it's someone elses money we deal with the manufacturer directly and waste as much money as possible.

+ 1

That is the root problem, and why the public sector will always be less efficient than private companies.

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It's the National Wealth Service. Choose any good you like and they will pay you over the odds for it.

I vote we buy the £47 pasta and forget all about the operation. That way the patient won't starve and the NHS will save loads of money on medical bills.

Unfortunately it is a prime example of how badly we manage to run things in Britain. I honestly think we could have some common sense people in and sort out most of theses nonsenses within a year..yes, yes, bound to be disenters and a strike ot two here and there, but you will get it done. Stop sending people to expensive uni courses on mundane pointless courses aswell. The we might not find so many 'graduates' working in supermarkets.

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Go on... please! :)

This is a bit tricky for anonymity reasons, but, let's put it this way, you know when you wash a floor at home? You probably use, I dunno, some floor cleaning product or even a bowl of soapy hot water?

Well, maybe, just maybe, there are some places that don't do that now, that don't use any kind of cleaning/antibacterial products for their floors. Places that probably should, considering.

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I was appalled when my sister (Pharmacy Manager) told me about how some people get most of their weekly grocery shopping on “prescription” paid for by the NHS. There are times her pharmacy looks like the self checkout lane at Tesco. If your child is under 16 and has an allergy the NHS will pay for special food (gluten free is the most common). Ridiculous really.

My son has a wheat allergy that’s off the scale so we could abuse the system and get prescription food for him for free. However I have too much pride and self value to even think about asking our local GP for such nonsense. Yes it costs a little more but if you can’t pay for it yourself then don’t have children!

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I was appalled when my sister (Pharmacy Manager) told me about how some people get most of their weekly grocery shopping on “prescription” paid for by the NHS. There are times her pharmacy looks like the self checkout lane at Tesco. If your child is under 16 and has an allergy the NHS will pay for special food (gluten free is the most common). Ridiculous really.

My son has a wheat allergy that’s off the scale so we could abuse the system and get prescription food for him for free. However I have too much pride and self value to even think about asking our local GP for such nonsense. Yes it costs a little more but if you can’t pay for it yourself then don’t have children!

The terrible thing is that children with extremely precise nutritional needs due to medical complications have been told by the NHS that it can no longer subsidise the cost of the food. One case I know about involving a little girl who had been born with her intestines on the outside of her body ended up with only two food stuffs available to her, and she cannot eat anything else.

Meanwhile, the NHS will fund gluten-free, when it is not that difficult to remove wheat from a diet (I don't eat any grains at all).

Topsy turvey policies.

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I can't think of any good reason why the NHS should provide gluten-free products on prescription. It's simple enough to feed yourself more than adequately and healthily from foods available off any grocery shop shelf.

Some gluten free foods to include:

Beans

Butter – in most cases (some brands may have additives that contain gluten, so read the label carefully)

Cheese – some brands (read the label first)

Corn

Corn tortillas

Cottage cheese

Eggs

Fish and shellfish

Fruit

Honey

Jam

Meat, like chicken or beef – some processed meats like hotdogs and sausages contain gluten, though, so read the label

Millet

Nuts (if they are dry roasted, they may contain gluten)

Popcorn (as long as it doesn’t have any kind of coating or seasoning that contains gluten)

Potatoes

Quinoa

Rice

Rice cakes and rice crackers

Soybeans

Sugar

Tofu

Vegetable oils

Vegetables

Yeast

Yogurt

http://quickcare.org/misc/list-of-gluten-free-foods.html

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I am wheat intolerant (to a certain extent) and wouldn't touch this crap with a barge pole.

This is the problem. Its no good looking for junk food substitutes.

If you have gluten problem then best to find "real" food alternatives. Humans can live without bloody pasta and bread FFS! mad.gif

I really do wonder about the intelligence in the NHS, They must leave their brains at home, when they go off to work.

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How the hell is gluten free pasta available on prescription anyway? I'm allergic to the lack of cavier and champagne in my diet at the moment - I need them on prescription please...

It's on prescription for people with Coeliac disease, which requires a lifelong strict gluten free diet to avoid potentially serious complications. The diagnosis has to be confirmed by a camera test to look inside your stomach and small intestine to take biopsies before GPs will prescribe it.

The prescription is to cover the extra cost of the gluten free products.

You can't just walk into your GP and say gluten gives you an upset tummy and get a gluten free presciprtion.

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This is a bit tricky for anonymity reasons, but, let's put it this way, you know when you wash a floor at home? You probably use, I dunno, some floor cleaning product or even a bowl of soapy hot water?

Well, maybe, just maybe, there are some places that don't do that now, that don't use any kind of cleaning/antibacterial products for their floors. Places that probably should, considering.

I understand. Thanks.

And considering that hospital acquired infection kills thousands of patients every year, a negligence of this order amounts to manslaughter.

Perhaps you could send this info anonymously to the press/media organisation, and they could do some investigative work?

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All those middle-managers are justifying their jobs well then. I thought the NHS was all about bean counters and KPI assesors? Surely someone would like to say at a meeting that they'd managed to knock 85% off the cost of gluten-free goods?!?

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