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okaycuckoo

Squeeze On Salaries

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Just overheard a conversation between three housing officers who work for different housing associations.

They all said they were busier than ever before, but all shared the same complaints. One was very specific on the figures.

Salary to be reduced from £27k to £23.5k and car allowance withdrawn. Area management consolidated, so one manager covers three areas, on a salary reduced from £44k to £36k.

Company properties are being sold, and workers have to relocate.

Everybody has to reapply for their jobs, and if they refuse they'll be let go without redundancy payments.

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Ill add the going rate for MS office skills, some literacy ability stands at the princely some of £7hr. This used to be around £10-11 hour 6 years ago.

The race to minimum wage continues. In retrospect the mortgage health warning should not have been 'House values can go up as well as down.' but rather 'Your salary will drop for the foreseeable future'

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Just overheard a conversation between three housing officers who work for different housing associations.

They all said they were busier than ever before, but all shared the same complaints. One was very specific on the figures.

Salary to be reduced from £27k to £23.5k and car allowance withdrawn. Area management consolidated, so one manager covers three areas, on a salary reduced from £44k to £36k.

Company properties are being sold, and workers have to relocate.

Everybody has to reapply for their jobs, and if they refuse they'll be let go without redundancy payments.

Yep the Basics for HPI is being erroded away.

House prices rise because wages rise.

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Yep the Basics for HPI is being erroded away.

House prices rise because wages rise.

Or borrowed funds rise. Cash rich foreign buyers rise. Confidence rises. Rents yield rise. Unemployment falls. ;)

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Everybody has to reapply for their jobs, and if they refuse they'll be let go without redundancy payments.

I'd like to see that stand up in court. Not applying for a job isn't the same as resigning your current position. If your current post is made redundant, then you're due redundancy payments if you're not offered an equivalent post.

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I'd like to see that stand up in court. Not applying for a job isn't the same as resigning your current position. If your current post is made redundant, then you're due redundancy payments if you're not offered an equivalent post.

Could be statutory redundancy, which is quite frankly f-all.

Still.. we seem to be going from 'Management/owners get huge rises, workers get tiny rises' to 'Management/owners get huge rises, workers get pay cuts'. Something will break at some point.

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Ill add the going rate for MS office skills, some literacy ability stands at the princely some of £7hr. This used to be around £10-11 hour 6 years ago.

The race to minimum wage continues. In retrospect the mortgage health warning should not have been 'House values can go up as well as down.' but rather 'Your salary will drop for the foreseeable future'

My partner had to forward a spreadsheet in excel to someone the other day, she didn't know what that was. I know a large amount of people without basic office skills in the workplace, thankfully not where I am now :)

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Or borrowed funds rise. Cash rich foreign buyers rise. Confidence rises. Rents yield rise. Unemployment falls. ;)

Never heard of a lender giving anyone a Mortgage because you are feeling Confident.

Yes thats right Mr Banker i cannot afford to repay a Mortgage but i am feeling CONFIDENT :lol:

Rents yield rise :lol:

Edited by awaytogo

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Never heard of a lender giving anyone a Mortgage because you are feeling Confident.

Yes thats right Mr Banker i cannot afford to repay a Mortgage but i am feeling CONFIDENT :lol:

Rents yield rise :lol:

Don't know, from 2003-2007 that was the standard IO repayment plan..

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Don't know, from 2003-2007 that was the standard IO repayment plan..

Yep

And look what a Mess it has left us in.

Lets Try it again.

Edited by awaytogo

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I'd like to see that stand up in court. Not applying for a job isn't the same as resigning your current position. If your current post is made redundant, then you're due redundancy payments if you're not offered an equivalent post.

My thoughts exactly, but if they didin't take the precaution of belonging to a union, they are unlikely to get it to court themselves whilst coping with looking for work and keeping their homes and families together.

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I think ive mentioned it before but a job i took five years ago for a while straight after uni that paid £17k in late 2006 was offering (same company, same role, same hours) £14k in late 2010 (saw ad in paper)

Things are tough if you're not a whiny public sector type.

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I think ive mentioned it before but a job i took five years ago for a while straight after uni that paid £17k in late 2006 was offering (same company, same role, same hours) £14k in late 2010 (saw ad in paper)

Things are tough if you're not a whiny public sector type.

Is it the public sector wages that are to high or the private sector which are to low, from your own post it is the latter which are falling.

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Why the argument public sector verses private sector . Look around you and you will see that wages in both sectors for many have been dropping in real terms for years , due to three main reasons.

1. The annual pay increases have not kept pace with the rising cost's due to the inflation lies .

2. As people have retired/left/died new people have been employed at lower rates of pay and worse conditions. This has happened in both the public and private sector , not all public sector jobs are cushy numbers paying £50k to tick boxes.

3. Companies have out sourced many jobs either here or abroad to people earning less and or employ people on short term contracts from agencies.

This has been happening for years , but people with kids have not noticed that much as they got quite a lot of money in Tax Credits to compensate. Even those not getting tax credits felt well off as their houses were rising in value and they could get cheap credit to keep up their standard of living. For many whatever their circumstances they did not notice that much , things seemed good for a long time.

Now with prices rising at such a fast pace , wages falling or staying the same , the credit being withdrawn and demands for repayment , throw in the tax rises both stealth and direct and people are starting to feel the pain.

Edited by miko

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Why the argument public sector verses private sector . Look around you and you will see that wages in both sectors for many have been dropping in real terms for years , due to three main reasons.

1. The annual pay increases have not kept pace with the rising cost's due to the inflation lies .

2. As people have retired/left/died new people have been employed at lower rates of pay and worse conditions. This has happened in both the public and private sector , not all public sector jobs are cushy numbers paying £50k to tick boxes.

3. Companies have out sourced many jobs either here or abroad to people earning less and or employ people on short term contracts from agencies.

This has been happening for years , but people with kids have not noticed that much as they got quite a lot of money in Tax Credits to compensate. Even those not getting tax credits felt well off as their houses were rising in value and they could get cheap credit to keep up their standard of living. For many whatever their circumstances they did not notice that much , things seemed good for a long time.

Now with prices rising at such a fast pace , wages falling or staying the same , the credit being withdrawn and demands for repayment , throw in the tax rises both stealth and direct and people are starting to feel the pain.

Yes, that makes sense and I am also seeing that.....fewer jobs with more demand means more people applying for each vacant position....firms can then pay a lower wage initially because there will always, for the majority of jobs be someone who will take the money offered to them....

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Leicester Hospitals (x 3) have been told this weekend by the CEO that there might not be enough money to pay salaries by August.

How's that for a salary squeeze.

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I'd like to see that stand up in court. Not applying for a job isn't the same as resigning your current position. If your current post is made redundant, then you're due redundancy payments if you're not offered an equivalent post.

It would be an employment tribunal not a court and yes the alternative is statutory which won't be worth a hell of a lot.

Big money can be made though unless they get the selection criteria spot on.

If for example someone was chosen for redundancy cos they are were a Jewish afro Caribbean with one leg then very probably the shit would fly.....

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Leicester Hospitals (x 3) have been told this weekend by the CEO that there might not be enough money to pay salaries by August.

How's that for a salary squeeze.

I bet there is enough for Mr. CEO and his 'management team' ;)

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Why the argument public sector verses private sector . Look around you and you will see that wages in both sectors for many have been dropping in real terms for years , due to three main reasons.

1. The annual pay increases have not kept pace with the rising cost's due to the inflation lies .

2. As people have retired/left/died new people have been employed at lower rates of pay and worse conditions. This has happened in both the public and private sector , not all public sector jobs are cushy numbers paying £50k to tick boxes.

3. Companies have out sourced many jobs either here or abroad to people earning less and or employ people on short term contracts from agencies.

This has been happening for years , but people with kids have not noticed that much as they got quite a lot of money in Tax Credits to compensate. Even those not getting tax credits felt well off as their houses were rising in value and they could get cheap credit to keep up their standard of living. For many whatever their circumstances they did not notice that much , things seemed good for a long time.

Now with prices rising at such a fast pace , wages falling or staying the same , the credit being withdrawn and demands for repayment , throw in the tax rises both stealth and direct and people are starting to feel the pain.

That sums it up well. Chilling.

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Why the argument public sector verses private sector . Look around you and you will see that wages in both sectors for many have been dropping in real terms for years , due to three main reasons.

1. The annual pay increases have not kept pace with the rising cost's due to the inflation lies .

2. As people have retired/left/died new people have been employed at lower rates of pay and worse conditions. This has happened in both the public and private sector , not all public sector jobs are cushy numbers paying £50k to tick boxes.

3. Companies have out sourced many jobs either here or abroad to people earning less and or employ people on short term contracts from agencies.

This has been happening for years , but people with kids have not noticed that much as they got quite a lot of money in Tax Credits to compensate. Even those not getting tax credits felt well off as their houses were rising in value and they could get cheap credit to keep up their standard of living. For many whatever their circumstances they did not notice that much , things seemed good for a long time.

Now with prices rising at such a fast pace , wages falling or staying the same , the credit being withdrawn and demands for repayment , throw in the tax rises both stealth and direct and people are starting to feel the pain.

The decline in earnings is also why much of the debt owed by individuals, businesses and governments in the west will be defaulted. The money is simply not their in profits, wages or taxes to pay it.

Bad for tribe but also bad for big chiefs too.

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Is it the public sector wages that are to high or the private sector which are to low, from your own post it is the latter which are falling.

Well, the private sector is the one that tends to be governed by competitive forces...

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Well, the private sector is the one that tends to be governed by competitive forces...

True

When the competetive forces are China india etc what is the Answer.

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  • 312 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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